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Gil
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Gil
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PostTue Jun 27, 2017 6:10 am 
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I've been taking my film cameras out on trips occasionally depending on my mood. Here's photographer Kurt Smith on the way back from Cutthroat Pass.

Trail back home in North Cascades National Park. Rokkor-X 50mm f1.7, Minolta X700, Kodak 400
Trail back home in North Cascades National Park. Rokkor-X 50mm f1.7, Minolta X700, Kodak 400

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Gil
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Gil
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PostSat Jul 15, 2017 9:45 pm 
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Friends chuckle when I bring my old film cameras into the mountains. But there's something about the experience of shooting film and the qualities of the result.  Rokkor-X 50mm f1.7, Minolta X-700, Kodak 400.
Friends chuckle when I bring my old film cameras into the mountains. But there's something about the experience of shooting film and the qualities of the result.  Rokkor-X 50mm f1.7, Minolta X-700, Kodak 400.
Enchantments
Enchantments

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Backpacker Joe
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PostSun Jul 16, 2017 5:11 pm 
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I guess I dont disagree so much, but I have to ask.   Why?  Just the ability to instantly adjust ISO is worth it to me.  In the past having to carry three or more bodies filled with differing film speeds was a pain in the butt!

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"If destruction be our lot we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen we must live through all time or die by suicide."

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boot up
Old Not Bold Hiker



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boot up
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PostSun Jul 16, 2017 7:23 pm 
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Backpacker Joe wrote:
I guess I dont disagree so much, but I have to ask.   Why?  Just the ability to instantly adjust ISO is worth it to me.  In the past having to carry three or more bodies filled with differing film speeds was a pain in the butt!

agree.gif  up.gif

But if it makes you happy.


I was an early adopter of digital photography.   Never looked back....

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Gil
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Gil
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PostSun Jul 16, 2017 8:24 pm 
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Why paint? It's so much easier to take a photo.

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Gil
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Gil
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PostSun Jul 16, 2017 8:29 pm 
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Ilford XP2 film, Rokkor-X 135mm f3.5, Minolta X700.
Ilford XP2 film, Rokkor-X 135mm f3.5, Minolta X700.

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Ski
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Ski
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PostSun Jul 16, 2017 8:49 pm 
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up.gif

Go for it.

I loved film once I finally figured out the little nuances between Agfa Optima 100 and Agfa Ultra 50 and gained some understanding (even though a bit klutzy) of just how to set those dials on that "f-stop" thingie and shutter speeds and all that, but it just got way too crazy expensive (and hard to find!) and my hit rate was maybe one or two great shots out of a 36-exposure roll.
Finally broke down and bought a cheapie digital and abandoned the idea I'd ever been competing with Ansel Adams. wink.gif

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Wazzu_camper
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PostThu Jul 20, 2017 9:57 am 
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I don't think i will ever go back to film at all, but I will say the one positive about using film is I would certainly take a lot more time setting up each shot. With digital, I tend to quickly pull out the cam and shoot without checking settings I should. For example, I will have been shooting the stars the night before and set the ISO to like 6400 and forgot about it the next day, then my first 10 pics of the day are shot at 6400, because unless I specifically need to crank it up I usually leave it at 100 and forget about it.

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NacMacFeegle
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PostThu Aug 03, 2017 4:28 pm 
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I've always wanted to branch out into film - there are some aspects of it that digital just isn't able to perfectly replicate. I've been seeing a lot more people out and about with old film cameras - I get the impression that with digital cameras and cell phone cameras becoming so common the uniqueness of shooting with film is starting to appeal to a lot more people.

If I were to start shooting with film I'd want to go big - medium format at the least. It's the development process that has scared me off so far. I haven't wanted to take the time to learn the ins and outs of the dark room, and I don't care to shell out the bucks to have it developed professionally. If I did do it, I'd only develop it as far as the negative, then scan that and process it in the computer. My thinking is that I'd carry it and my digital camera, use my digital camera to find the right settings and compose the best photo possible. I'd only pull the trigger on the film camera when I knew it would be the perfect shot.

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Read my hiking related stories and more at http://illuminationsfromtheattic.blogspot.com/
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joker
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PostWed Aug 09, 2017 7:17 am 
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I recently  sold my medium and large format film gear. I'm glad I held on for a bit, as its value went through a deep trough, and though it is still not  nearly worth what it was pre-digital, as the buyer at Glazer's told me,  it's acquired a degree of "hipness"  that has brought back at least some  of the value. There is very  little I miss about working with film. I really like the increased dynamic range I get from  modern sensors, as well as the increased acuity and relatively  low-noise when shooting high ISO. The "lightroom" is so much more pleasant to  work in than the darkroom, and so much more powerful. But to  each their own.  There are still people doing some great work with even older processes like Van Dyke Brown etc.

NacMacFeegle wrote:
My thinking is that I'd carry it and my digital camera, use my digital camera to find the right settings and compose the best photo possible. I'd only pull the trigger on the film camera when I knew it would be the perfect shot.

I"d be curious to know how well  that works out. As I noted above, dynamic range of modern sensors exceeds that of film, so it won't be a perfect visualization. But you will likely be able to  calibrate your eye such that this works reasonably well for you - perhaps better  than picking up  and old used Gossen Luna Pro light meter with a spot meter attachment and learning to previsualize in the style of Ansel Adams.
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Jim Dockery
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PostThu Aug 10, 2017 1:18 pm 
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More power too you Gil & Mac! I'd be very interested to see comparison shots if you bring both film and digital shooting the same subject.

Like most posting replies here I sold my film gear soon after getting a digital camera and never looked back. The cost of film & processing is one of the biggies for me (although I seem to offset that with digital camera upgrades eek.gif ). Shooting to my heart's content lets me experiment and not worry about mistakes. On the other hand my wife would say it's led to me shooting too much when I bracket, focus stack, and do panos that sometimes combine all three! dizzy.gif She now brings her iphone on hikes so she has something to do when I find an area that catches me for for a long time. That doesn't even take into account all the time I spend at the computer afterward organizing, backing up, and processing the thousands of shots I can do on a longer trip rolleyes.gif

Here are a few shots from BITD, most shot with an Olympus OM4-t on Fuji Velvia 50, or Provia 100, scanned with a Nikon Coolscan 4000:

North Face Les Courtes
North Face Les Courtes
Walker Spur, Grandes Jorasses
Walker Spur, Grandes Jorasses
Left Wall of Cenetaph Corner, Wales
Left Wall of Cenetaph Corner, Wales
Dolomites sunset
Dolomites sunset

I've always admired the great black and white photographers, Ansel Adams shot of the NW face of Half Dome (my 1st big wall climb) epitomizing that work.

I never mastered the art of black and white film/printing, so digital conversion using Silver FX Pro has been a great example of the modern tools that make once extremely difficult and time consuming tasks fun and relatively easy.

Tour Ronde North Face
Tour Ronde North Face
Tre Cima
Tre Cima
Modern Times, South face of Marmalada
Modern Times, South face of Marmalada
Sea Cliff climbing Wales
Sea Cliff climbing Wales
Austrian Alps
Austrian Alps

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Gil
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Gil
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PostMon Aug 14, 2017 10:00 am 
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Those were the days.
Morning in La Vallee Blanche, Mont Blanc. Two friends and I made the ski descent from l'Aiguille du Midi in February 1986. Nikon F2, Nikkor 20mm f4, Kodachrome 64.
Morning in La Vallee Blanche, Mont Blanc. Two friends and I made the ski descent from l'Aiguille du Midi in February 1986. Nikon F2, Nikkor 20mm f4, Kodachrome 64.
Skiers prepare for the descent from L'Aiguille du Midi down La Vallee Blanche on Mont Blanc, February 1986. Nikon F2, Nikkor 20mm f4, Kodachrome 64.
Skiers prepare for the descent from L'Aiguille du Midi down La Vallee Blanche on Mont Blanc, February 1986. Nikon F2, Nikkor 20mm f4, Kodachrome 64.

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Chico
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PostFri Aug 18, 2017 1:07 am 
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Miss Kodachrome! Shot with it almost exclusively!

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joker
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PostFri Aug 18, 2017 9:55 am 
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Chico wrote:
Miss Kodachrome! Shot with it almost exclusively!

I might even  still shoot film  now and then if Kodachrome still  existed. I used Ektachrome and Ektacolor more  in large part because for a long time I had unlimited access to a color photo lab  that had very good and well-calibrated E-6  and C-4 processing lines, whereas I would have to  send the Kodachrome to  one of the  few  facilities in the country doing processing of it and w---a---I---t for the results. Plus it was much easier for me to print from  the Ektacolor (the  lab had a C-print line, and I liked C-prints more than high-contrast/high-saturation  Cibachrome inany  case) and it  had a bit better dynamic range than either of the  slide film options. But Paul  Simon was  for sure right
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MtnGoat
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PostWed Aug 23, 2017 5:13 pm 
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Wazzu_camper wrote:
For example, I will have been shooting the stars the night before and set the ISO to like 6400 and forgot about it the next day, then my first 10 pics of the day are shot at 6400, because unless I specifically need to crank it up I usually leave it at 100 and forget about it.

There's a trick with ISO for star shots..the ISO is really just the amplifier gain when the pixels are read out, the basic sensitivity of the sensor is unchanged. This means you get high noise at high ISO. When I'm doing my astro work, I don't shoot above 800 very often and then I bring out the faint stuff in post processing by stretching levels and stuff. Much cleaner frames.

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Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
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