Forum Index > Stewardship > 'Environmental Nightmare' After Thousands Of Atlantic Salmon Escape Fish Farm 08/24/17
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 8152 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
><((((°>
PostSat Sep 30, 2017 4:49 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Friday September 29, 2017 17:01 PDT

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

Cowlitz, Green, North Fork Toutle rivers will close to chinook salmon fishing


VANCOUVER, Wash. – Starting Oct. 2, anglers will be required to release any chinook salmon they intercept on the Cowlitz, Green and North Fork Toutle rivers due to low returns of hatchery chinook.

State fishery managers at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) said the closures are necessary to ensure that enough fall chinook return to those rivers to support hatchery production during the coming year.

All three rivers will remain open to retention of other fish species, as listed in the 2017 Sport Fishing Rules.

"This was a tough decision for fishery managers, but we can't ignore the lagging chinook returns," said Dan Rawding, acting WDFW regional fish manager. "We have to think about producing fish for next year too."

According to the pre-season forecast, 3,900 hatchery fall chinook were expected to cross Barrier Dam this year, with a goal of collecting 1,900 fish for hatchery broodstock. So far, only 700 chinook have returned to the river, and Rawding said fish managers are now hoping to get 1,400 back to the hatchery.

The Cowlitz River remains open to fishing for coho salmon, summer steelhead, and sea-run cutthroat trout.

On the Green River, only 400 chinook have been collected this year out of an expected return of 1,000 hatchery fish. The broodstock goal is 800 fish at the hatchery, which produces chinook returning to the Green and North Toutle rivers.

Two other large Columbia River tributaries – the Kalama and the Washougal – will remain open to fishing for chinook salmon. There, too, chinook returns are lower than expected, but fishery managers still expect to meet hatchery broodstock goals on those rivers, Rawding said.

Rawding said WDFW will continue to monitor salmon returns in area rivers, and will consider reopening rivers to chinook fishing if returns improve in the coming weeks.

More information about these rule changes can be found on WDFW's website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/

-WDFW-

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 8152 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
><((((°>
PostTue Oct 03, 2017 10:07 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Tuesday October 03, 2017 09:55 PDT

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

WDFW issues permit to Cooke Aquaculture to transport juvenile Atlantic salmon


OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has authorized Cooke Aquaculture to transport about 1 million juvenile Atlantic salmon from the company's hatchery in Rochester, Wash., to an existing net-pen facility in Puget Sound.

Eric Kinne, manager of WDFW's hatchery division, said the transport permit is not related to the company's Cypress Island net-pen facility near the San Juan Islands, where one of Cooke's pens collapsed on Aug. 19 and released tens of thousands of Atlantic salmon into Puget Sound and nearby waters.

Following the net pen collapse, Gov. Jay Inslee directed that no permits be issued for new aquaculture net pens while the incident was being investigated. However, current laws and administrative rules do not give state regulators the authority to deny Cooke's permit to move healthy fish into an existing net pen. The Governor's Office asked Cooke to withdraw its permit application and expressed disappointment that the company chose to proceed while thousands of escaped Atlantic salmon remain unrecovered.

Cooke, which operates net pens at eight locations in Puget Sound, applied in late August for permission to move about 1 million 2-year-old smolts from the hatchery to its Rich Passage facility in south Puget Sound. The move is expected to take place through the fall.

WDFW issued the fish transport permit late Monday, Oct. 2, after working to ensure the company's facilities at Rich Passage met structural, water quality, and fish health requirements. Staff from WDFW and the departments of Natural Resources and Ecology visited the net-pen site last week. Ecology staff inspected the facility and did not find violations of the current water quality permit. Divers hired by DNR examined the net pens and support structures below the surface at Clam Bay along Rich Passage. The inspection did not yield grounds to deny the permit.

The Cypress Island incident remains under investigation, and efforts continue to recover the fish that escaped. About half of the 305,000 fish from the collapsed pen are thought to have escaped.

-WDFW-

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 9855 | TRs
Location: Lyle, WA
MtnGoat
Member
PostTue Oct 03, 2017 5:05 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I'm glad procedures are being followed and they can grow their juvenile salmon to market size.

--------------
Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 8152 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
><((((°>
PostMon Oct 09, 2017 1:02 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I wonder if one of our resident experts can weigh in on this piece, which offers no clue as to cause, or even what the condition might be.

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
mike
Member
Member


Joined: 09 Jul 2004
Posts: 5900 | TRs
Location: SJIsl
mike
Member
PostMon Oct 09, 2017 1:11 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Seattle Times today. Not good news.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 9855 | TRs
Location: Lyle, WA
MtnGoat
Member
PostTue Oct 10, 2017 9:23 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
When I take a look at their graph I see a roughly 6 year cycle in the numbers, with the current year at a 6 year spacing from the previous low.

--------------
Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 8152 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
><((((°>
PostTue Oct 10, 2017 10:56 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Monday October 09, 2017 16:18 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

WDFW to close the lower Samish River to all fishing


Action: Close part of the Samish River to all fishing.

Effective dates: Oct. 10, 2017, until further notice

Species affected: All species.

Location: From the mouth (Bayview–Edison Road) to I-5 Bridge.

Reasons for action: The return of fall chinook to the Samish Hatchery is projected to be below the number needed to meet egg take goals. Closing the fishing season in the lower Samish River will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and ensure future hatchery returns.

Other information: The season will be reopened when egg take needs are projected to be met, or when the chinook return is over. Please refer to http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ for further information on seasons.

-WDFW-

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 8152 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
><((((°>
PostWed Oct 11, 2017 8:08 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Wednesday October 11, 2017 16:13 PDT

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

WDFW issues permit to Cooke Aquaculture to transport Atlantic salmon eggs from Iceland


OLYMPIA – The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has authorized Cooke Aquaculture to transport 1.8 million Atlantic salmon eggs from its facility in Iceland to the company's land-based hatchery in Rochester, Wash.

WDFW issued the transfer permit late Tuesday, Oct. 10, after ensuring Cooke met all the fish health standards required under state law to import Atlantic salmon eggs.

Cooke operates net pens at eight locations in Puget Sound, including at Cypress Island, where one pen collapsed on Aug. 19 and released tens of thousands of Atlantic salmon into Puget Sound and nearby waters.

The incident at Cypress Island, near the San Juan Islands, remains under investigation. About half of the 305,000 fish from the collapsed pen are thought to have escaped.

After the net pen collapse in August, Gov. Jay Inslee directed that no permits be issued for new aquaculture net pens while the incident was being investigated. However, WDFW does not have the authority under current regulations to deny Cooke's request to import healthy Atlantic salmon eggs, which will mature at the hatchery into juvenile fish and eventually be used in net pen operations.

Cooke applied in mid-September for permission to move about 1.8 million Atlantic salmon eggs from its hatchery in Vogar, Iceland, to the company's Scatter Creek hatchery in Rochester. The move is expected to take place later this week.

-WDFW-

=========================================================

Wednesday October 11, 2017 16:00 PDT

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

Sections of Snake River to open Oct. 15 to steelhead retention; catch limit to increase on tributaries


OLYMPIA – Beginning Oct. 15, anglers can keep two hatchery steelhead daily in sections of the Snake River and some streams in southeast Washington, state fish managers said today.

The fishing rule changes announced by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) affect the following areas:

Snake River from the Washington-Idaho state line at Clarkston upstream to the Couse Creek boat ramp will open Oct. 15 for daily retention of two hatchery steelhead (marked with a clipped adipose fin) of less than 28 inches in length.
Snake River from Couse Creek to the Idaho-Oregon state line will open Oct. 15 for daily retention of two hatchery steelhead of any size.
On the Grand Ronde and Tucannon rivers (Snake River tributaries) and on the Walla Walla and Touchet rivers (Columbia River tributaries), the daily catch limit will increase on Oct. 15 from one hatchery steelhead to two.
Anglers should be aware that the section of the Snake River from the mouth near the Tri-Cities to the Washington-Idaho state line at Clarkston will not open for steelhead retention. Steelhead fishing in this section will remain open only for catch-and-release fishing, said Chris Donley, WDFW eastern region fish program manager.

Anglers fishing for steelhead in the Snake and Columbia rivers have been allowed to retain only one steelhead or limited to catch-and-release fishing due to low returns of adult steelhead. These restrictions were designed to protect both A-run steelhead (fish smaller than 28 inches) and B-run steelhead (those 28 inches and larger) destined for the Columbia and Snake River basins.

However, A-run steelhead, both wild and hatchery-origin adults, have returned in adequate numbers to allow opening portions of the Snake River to harvest and increasing catch limits on some tributaries, Donley said.

As forecasted, the B-run steelhead are returning at exceptionally low rates, which is why other sections of the Columbia and Snake rivers will remain closed to harvest of steelhead in the coming months, Donley said. WDFW is requiring anglers to release steelhead that are 28-inches or larger in some areas to protect B-run fish.

"These measures will help ensure that sufficient numbers of wild and hatchery fish return to their natal streams," Donley said. "But we'll continue to monitor the steelhead run over the coming months, and either curtail the harvest of steelhead if needed, or provide more harvest opportunity if possible."

Additional details of these fisheries are available on WDFW's website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/

-WDFW-

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
cartman
Member
Member


Joined: 20 Feb 2007
Posts: 2676 | TRs
Location: Fremont
cartman
Member
PostWed Oct 11, 2017 8:33 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
AlpineRose wrote:
MtnGoat wrote:
So much time and energy and resources wasted on the notion that animals or plants are 'unnatural'  because of how they arrived. Everything which happens is fundamentally natural and the dichotomy is only an artificial one.

Invasives, both plant and animal, can be incredibly destructive to local biomes and ecosystems.  The complex web of life in an area is made up of thousands of interrelationships of species evolved specifically for that habitat.  Invasives can disrupt those relationships in a heartbeat (geologically speaking).

Think of an invasive species as an infection of the local environment.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 9855 | TRs
Location: Lyle, WA
MtnGoat
Member
PostThu Oct 12, 2017 4:43 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Which was infected with life from somewhere else at the outset.

The distinction is totally artificial.

--------------
Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Jaberwock
Member
Member


Joined: 30 Jan 2013
Posts: 610 | TRs
Location: Bellingham
Jaberwock
Member
PostThu Oct 12, 2017 7:53 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Jim Mighell wrote:
I am significantly sure

Shouldn't a scientist know that if you say "significantly" you need to show the statistics to back it up?
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Doppelganger
Armchairing



Joined: 09 Feb 2006
Posts: 1218 | TRs
Location: Sparkwood & 21
Doppelganger
Armchairing
PostFri Oct 13, 2017 10:14 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat wrote:
Which was infected with life from somewhere else at the outset.

The distinction is totally artificial.

I'll get into this argument occasionally. I think that it is irresponsible to say that since humans themselves exist within the circle/web/etc of life/nature/etc as a race, our actions by extension are also 'natural'.

I like to remind the people who say "everything is natural, what's the problem!" that humans made up the word 'natural' and the definition itself is artificial and subjective. Saying that everything we do falls within the cycle of nature is just a lazy excuse, a shrug of the shoulders and a coward's means of turning away from the central truth that as a race we have unprecedented ability to affect the variables which control our environment. With that comes an equivalent responsibility. It just never seems right to me when the consequences of our actions are simply accepted with a glib "it's nature".

Edit:
MtnGoat wrote:
warmists... expertise of the skeptics, like Dr Gray

OK, never mind, your perspective is making sense now. Carry on. "expertise"  rolleyes.gif  lol.gif  lol.gif
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Jim Mighell
Fish Rsrch Biologist



Joined: 26 Oct 2011
Posts: 23 | TRs

Jim Mighell
Fish Rsrch Biologist
PostFri Oct 13, 2017 3:48 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Jaberwock states "Shouldn't a scientist know that if you say "significantly" you need to show the statistics to back it up?"

Perhaps - but depends on the audience - Be assured there is plenty of evidence to support any of my assertions - just too timely to list all. OK?

other thoughts:  The bloody lesions shown on the larger salmonid, are likely caused by the crustacean that is commonly known as Sea Lice, but other organisms may also produce the same result, which may or may not be fatal to the fish. The Pacific Lamprey will also produce similar lesions.

The recent discovery of lack of normal populations of North Pacific salmonids sounds very ominous: I wonder if it has any connection to a radio discussion I heard while driving in the Wenatchee area a month ago, that described the tremendous amount of radio activity associated with the melt down of the Japanese Nuclear power plant a few years ago - the assertion was that small organisms and fishes were being contaminated with enough radioactivity to kill the organisms that they were providing food for, including humans that eat fish or other sea organisms from the North Pacific?????? The author claimed he would not allow his family to eat any of the fishes or other sea organisms we commonly purchase for food from the N. Pacific.
Question? Real or NOT?  His prediction was massive loss of salmonids and perhaps Tuna that feed on North Pacific fishes.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 9855 | TRs
Location: Lyle, WA
MtnGoat
Member
PostFri Oct 13, 2017 6:59 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Doppelganger wrote:
I'll get into this argument occasionally. I think that it is irresponsible to say that since humans themselves exist within the circle/web/etc of life/nature/etc as a race, our actions by extension are also 'natural'.

I like to remind the people who say "everything is natural, what's the problem!" that humans made up the word 'natural' and the definition itself is artificial and subjective. Saying that everything we do falls within the cycle of nature is just a lazy excuse, a shrug of the shoulders and a coward's means of turning away from the central truth that as a race we have unprecedented ability to affect the variables which control our environment. With that comes an equivalent responsibility. It just never seems right to me when the consequences of our actions are simply accepted with a glib "it's nature".

Edit:

Doppelganger wrote:
OK, never mind, your perspective is making sense now. Carry on. "expertise"  rolleyes.gif  lol.gif  lol.gif

Regardless of how irresponsible you find recognition of that fact, it remains fact. I don't need an 'excuse' to disagree with a subjective value judgment, I openly choose to do so. I explicitly and directly decide not to care because it's arbitrary and I see no reason to worry about these fish.

Life is not static nor are ecosystems, there is no reason to expect stasis or fetishize any particular mix of organisms in a given arrangement at a given time. So some fish escaped which have little chance of reproduction.

Now your perspective makes more sense too. You slyly denigrate a posters perspective because you don't accept an indisputable background in expertise for Dr Grey because you disagree with scientific arguments .....on a political basis. It cannot be a scientific one, in real sciences experts who disagree will still recognize expertise in spite of differing conclusions. Meanwhile you seem to be applying agreement with what you believe as the standard for someone else's expertise, so we see the man who basically was the progenitor of hurricane studies used as an ad hom attack.

--------------
Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ski
><((((°>



Joined: 28 May 2005
Posts: 8152 | TRs
Location: tacoma
Ski
><((((°>
PostFri Oct 13, 2017 7:27 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Friday October 13, 2017 11:14 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE   

Quillayute River and most tributaries to close Oct. 16 due to low river flows


Action:  Closes the Quillayute, Sol Duc, and Dickey rivers to all fishing.

Closes sections of the Bogachiel and Calawah rivers to salmon fishing and other sections of those rivers to all fishing.

Effective date:   Oct. 16, 2017 until further notice.

Locations and affected species: 

Quillayute River: Closed to all fishing.
Sol Duc River: Closed to all fishing.
Dickey River: Closed to all fishing.
Bogachiel River, downstream of Wilson's boat launch and upstream of the Highway 101 bridge: Closed to all fishing.
Bogachiel River, between Highway 101 and Wilson's boat ramp: Closed to salmon retention but remains open to fishing for trout and hatchery summer steelhead.
Calawah River, upstream of the Highway 101 bridge: Closed to all fishing.   
Calawah River, downstream of the Highway 101 bridge: Closed to salmon retention but remains open to fishing for trout and hatchery summer steelhead. 
Reason for action: Unusually low river flows in recent weeks have created difficult migrating conditions for returning salmon, impeding their movement upstream. The closure is intended to protect these fish until flow conditions change sufficiently to enable normal salmon migration and the attainment of escapement goals.

These rivers will re-open when flows have normalized sufficiently to allow consistent, unimpeded migration.

Further Information:  The Quileute Tribe is closing fisheries in the Quillayute River until flows improve and Olympic National Park is closing waters within the park boundaries.

Information contact: Region 6 Office, (360) 249-4628.

-WDFW-

========================================================

Friday October 13, 2017 14:38 PDT

Olympic National Park News Release

Emergency Closure of Recreational Fishing in the Quillayute, Dickey, and Hoh Rivers within Olympic National Park


PORT ANGELES, WA: Due to concerns about low river flows impeding salmon migrations, Olympic National Park is closing the Quillayute, Dickey, and Hoh River mouths to fishing beginning Monday, October 16 until further notice. This closure includes portions of each river within the boundaries of Olympic National Park.

The emergency closure is designed to maximize the protection of migrating salmon that are more vulnerable to harvest in treaty and sport fisheries during extreme low-flow conditions. The Quileute Tribe and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife are also closing treaty and sport fisheries in the Quillayute and Dickey Rivers. The Hoh Tribe is closing its treaty fishery in the Hoh River.

“The National Park Service provides diverse recreational fishing opportunities while ensuring the preservation and restoration of native fish,” said Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum. “With the unusually low flows in these coastal rivers the emergency closure is critical to provide additional protection to migrating salmon.” 

The portions of rivers within Olympic National Park will re-open to sport fishing when river flows increase and allow unimpeded upstream migrations by adult salmon.

For more information about fishing in Olympic National Park, including a complete copy of the current fishing regulations, people can visit the park’s website at www.nps.gov/olym/planyourvisit/fishing.htm.

-NPS-

=========================================================

Friday October 13, 2017 16:58 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE   

Hoh River to close Oct. 16 due to low river flows impeding salmon migration


Action:  Closes the Hoh and South Fork Hoh Rivers outside of Olympic National Park to all fishing.

Effective date:   Oct. 16, 2017 until further notice.

Species affected:  All species. 

Location:  The Hoh River System

Reason for action: Unusually low river flows in recent weeks have created difficult migrating conditions for returning salmon, impeding their movement upstream. The closure is intended to protect these fish until flow conditions change sufficiently to enable normal salmon migration and the attainment of escapement goals.

These rivers will re-open when flows have normalized sufficiently to allow consistent, unimpeded migration.

Further Information:  The Hoh Tribe is closing fisheries until river flows improve and Olympic National Park is closing waters within the park boundaries.

Information contact: Region 6 Office: (360) 249-4628

-WDFW-

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Stewardship > 'Environmental Nightmare' After Thousands Of Atlantic Salmon Escape Fish Farm 08/24/17
  Happy Birthday outdoorgirl, wildernessed!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy