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Haley_hikes
Haley_hikes



Joined: 28 Nov 2017
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Haley_hikes
PostTue Nov 28, 2017 9:45 pm 
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Hello! I did a backpacking trip out to Ancient Lakes last weekend and Iím intrigued by the concept of other off season backpacking options. I have the equipment to camp in snow, but itís new so I want to baby step my way into it. Open to any recommendations or experience! I camp with my dog so much of the coast and National Parks are off limits.

Iíve researched a few options: Summit Lake, Lily/Lizard Lake, Lower Gray Wolf River, Barclay Lake, Umtanum Creek Canyon
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andypandy
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PostWed Nov 29, 2017 8:06 pm 
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Last time I was going through lizard and lily lakes in the winter someone had left behind some cans, a half box of tampons and other miscellaneous garbage mostly in the fire pit. That spot gets trashed pretty frequently.
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The Lead Dog
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PostFri Dec 01, 2017 1:11 pm 
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The Beach! Rialto to Hole in the Wall or beyond. Lots of spots, and more if you can pack enough water so you don't have to find any.
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RichP
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PostFri Dec 01, 2017 6:55 pm 
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Juniper Dunes seems like it would be a good winter destination.

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Without obsession, life is nothing. John Waters
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DadFly
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PostMon Dec 11, 2017 10:33 am 
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I will be heading out to Snoqualmie pass Friday evening and coming back Saturday about noon.
All are welcome to join me.
Snowshoers and Skiiers are welcome.
I will be leaving from Redmond and returning to my gym with a hot tub on 148th and Main in Bellevue. The East Gate park n Ride would be a good meeting place if you want to car pool. Preston works also.

I am "testing" my new 5 degree synthetic bag.
Shooting for the ridge above Source lake/Snow lake but can be very flexible.
Headlamps will be needed of course.

My gear list is available on request.

Avalanche/weather will be considered. https://www.nwac.us/

I like to get out like this for short outdoor "fixes". I do it a lot and am happy to share the experience I have gathered over 50 years of cold weather outings. If you are new to this sort of thing, this is a good way to start. I will adjust the trip to people's needs if needed.

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"May you live in interesting times"
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DadFly
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PostMon Dec 11, 2017 10:55 am 
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Here is what I take. I may have missed an item or two so everyone is free to chime in.
It is all selected for light weight without compromising warmth and function. I have been winter backpacking/climbing/ski mountaineering for over 50 years.

I offer no guarantees. This list works for me because I have decades of experience. Judgement is everything out there especially if you are alone. Have you checked avalanche conditions for your area? (https://www.nwac.us/)

Pick a route that avoids danger. Go up a wide flat valley if you are not sure.
Are you in good shape? Winter travel is harder than summer travel unless you get really good on skiis.
There is so much more to it. Be careful!!!!
And the golden rule, Have fun.


1. rain jacket
2. rain pants.
3. Cap with a bill to keep sun and rain off face.
4. Seattle sombrero rain hat. Outdoor Research or other brands.
5. capilene underwear top. Plus an extra to change into after a sweaty day.
6. Light wool sweater. I like the ones with a collar that I can turn up.
7. Light insulated jacket. A medium wool sweater or pile jacket will work if you have a wind breaker too.
8. wind breaker (I take it to wear when I am really hot and need to vent sweat)
9. Heavy insulated coat with hood.
10. capilene underwear bottom.
11. Scholler pants. (REI Mistrals with wool long underwear and gortex pants is all I need).
12. Wool long underwear or light weight pile pants to wear under your pants.
13. Wool hat.
14. neck gaitor.
15. Gloves preferably waterproof
16. mittens. preferably waterproof
17. Waterproof hiking boots.
18. Wool socks, two pair.
19. Gators
20. hiking poles
21. Snowshoes or skiis.
22. Bandana.
23. sunglasses or goggles.
24. water bottle. BPA free so you can put hot water in it and take it to bed with you and then drink it in the morning.
25. Sleeping bag +20. Synthetic is best in the Pacific NW but down is OK if you are careful to keep it dry. A trash compactor bag to pack it in is a must.
26. If I take a down bag I also take a very light synthetic blanket to put over the top. This allows me to use the space blanket and rub against the tent walls without getting my down wet. More important for multi night trips.
27. Space blanket. This makes a big difference for warmth and is good for covering gear during camp set up and take down.
28. Full length closed cell pad
29. Full or ĺ length thermarest inflatable pad.
30. Tent. I like an open front so I can see out even if it is raining or snowing. As long as it takes strong wind and keeps you dry.
31. spoon,
32. cup,
33. bowl.
34. pocket knife.
35. headlamp (lithium batteries work at low temperatures)
36. Stove
37. Fuel (if using canisters, bring into your sleeping bag after the morning pee to warm it. Or put it in your pillow wrapped in a jacket or sweater)
38. Cooking pot with cover
39. matches.
40. lighter.
41. Many munchies.
42. Tea.
43. Coffee
44. Oatmeal and fruit per breakfast
45. Sandwich. Chips. Power bar. per lunch
46. CoosCoos or soup and sandwich for dinner.
47. Wine in a small collapsible water bottle. Be careful. I find that I drink as much as I take.
48. One extra day of food.
49. ibuprofin, aleve.
50. Small first aid kit.
51. Sunscreen
52. Whistle
53. Compass
54. Map
55. GPS app on smart phone. I use Gaia. There are some free ones that work without cell coverage too.
56. Camera.
57. Hand warmers (2 sets).
58. Book or kindle or iPhone (long nights)
59. reading glasses.
60. Pack
61. Waterproof pack cover. Garbage bags work great but I use the nylon ones.
62.   Avalanche gear depending on terrain.

Again, please chime in with any suggestions or questions.

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"May you live in interesting times"
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