Forum Index > Photography Talk > x-t20 bag/case for hiking and backpacking?
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
shoulderseason
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Jul 2017
Posts: 6 | TRs
Location: Seattle
shoulderseason
Member
PostTue Jan 30, 2018 2:51 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Hi all. I've been a longtime user of the RX100 series and found it a good compromise for travel and hiking backpacking. Over the last year, though, I've been leaning toward a slightly larger sensor and some of the flexibility of an ILC, preferably with some more dedicated controls.

After probably too much indecision (and looking at the many excellent photos people post here), I'm leaning toward an X-T20, probably starting with the kit 18-55 but eventually adding a wide prime and maybe their 18-135.

One of the things I love about the RX100 series is that it fits well in an Osprey Digistow, so I don't smash it up too much when I watch the scenery more than what's right in front of me. It's easy to attach to chest or hip belts or to toss in a bag.

I've seen some of the clip-on attachments for ILC, and those appeal, though I don't know how much I trust myself. Even if I end up doing that much of the time, I still would like something to put the camera plus an attached lens sometimes, and am thinking ahead to carrying multiple lenses. Has anyone here found a good option that balances protection for the camera with weight/bulk?

This will also be my first ILC, so also feel free to point out any errant assumptions or ideas that don't fit with your experience.

Also -- in case it is helpful for anyone else thinking through this, anyone wants to reopen the can of worms on camera choice, I was torn between the X-T20, the A6500, the X-E3, the M100, and the M-D E-M10 III.
  • I've been really happy with the RX100, so started looking with the A6300 and A6500, but Sony's lens system is a bit limited. That seems to be improving?
  • I liked the XT-20's controls better than the X-E3's, though would love the touchscreen on the XE-3.
  • It seems like Fujifilm has a decent range of lenses at decent prices. Unfortunately, the lack of IBIS seems limiting for 3rd party lenses.
  • The Canon EOS series seems really promising but doesn't seem as mature as competitors. The lack of USB charging in the M100 is annoying; for longer trips, I've loved that a backup battery and an Anker solar panel mean that I'm not really sweating battery life anymore.
  • Reviewers seem to love the M-D E-M10 III, but I just didn't like its controls or JPG output as much as what I saw with the X series.


--------------
Flickr | Travel & hiking blog
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Sore Feet
Random Quippy Bit



Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 6183 | TRs
Location: I'm on a boat
Sore Feet
Random Quippy Bit
PostTue Jan 30, 2018 7:04 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I was leaning toward picking up an X-T2 or an X-T20 as a backpacking camera to cut down on some weight.  The X-E3 doesn't quite have the features that the X series bodies do, and I didn't really want to buy into the Sony ecosystem having already invested in a ton of Nikon gear.  I decided to not get either because the weight savings over my existing setup (D600) would only have been about a pound (not really worth the investment) and the decrease in image quality was definitely noticeable from the raw files I had a chance to play around with - plus Nikon is rumored to be releasing a new mirrorless this year.  But either of the X-T models look like fine cameras and they are more than capable of producing some excellent results.  I know a couple of pros who switched to Fuji and have no regrets at all.

--------------
Bryan Swan
Pictures - http://www.flickr.com/photos/bryanswan
Waterfalls - www.waterfallsnorthwest.com
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
boot up
Old Not Bold Hiker



Joined: 12 Dec 2006
Posts: 4747 | TRs
Location: Bend Oregon
boot up
Old Not Bold Hiker
PostTue Jan 30, 2018 8:00 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Any reason you aren't considering micro-4/3 format for a hiking camera?

All the compact bodies are getting close to the same size in all formats, but the slightly smaller sensor gains you a significantly lighter and smaller lens because it requires a smaller patch of light.   Simple physics says the larger sensor requires a larger lens.   That is why the tiny sensor cameras can have super zooms in a very compact package, albeit with a significant loss of image quality and dynamic range.

  And you have a large range of lenses to choose from, ranging from decent quality to pro quality lens.  And once you are on the M4/3 standard, you can use your lens even if you switch brands.    Some pretty amazing image stabilization is becoming available too.

For myself, I find M4/3 is the sweet spot for a decent size sensor but I am still willing to lug it along on every hike.

Just a thought.

--------------
friluftsliv
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Sore Feet
Random Quippy Bit



Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 6183 | TRs
Location: I'm on a boat
Sore Feet
Random Quippy Bit
PostWed Jan 31, 2018 6:34 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Fuji literally just announced this too:
https://www.dpreview.com/news/4155451385/fujifilms-new-x-a5-adds-phase-detect-af-and-4k-video-capture

--------------
Bryan Swan
Pictures - http://www.flickr.com/photos/bryanswan
Waterfalls - www.waterfallsnorthwest.com
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 4897 | TRs

gb
Member
PostThu Feb 01, 2018 9:18 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
boot up wrote:
Any reason you aren't considering micro-4/3 format for a hiking camera?

All the compact bodies are getting close to the same size in all formats, but the slightly smaller sensor gains you a significantly lighter and smaller lens because it requires a smaller patch of light.   Simple physics says the larger sensor requires a larger lens.   That is why the tiny sensor cameras can have super zooms in a very compact package, albeit with a significant loss of image quality and dynamic range.

And you have a large range of lenses to choose from, ranging from decent quality to pro quality lens.  And once you are on the M4/3 standard, you can use your lens even if you switch brands.    Some pretty amazing image stabilization is becoming available too.

The image stabilization on Olympus cameras is superb and pretty much means you get sharp shots no matter what if the sun is still up. There are far more lens choices in m4/3 and pro quality lenses are very sharp.

Quote:
For myself, I find M4/3 is the sweet spot for a decent size sensor but I am still willing to lug it along on every hike.

Just a thought.

You can go small or large. The EM-10 III is a dumbed down camera, try the EM-5 II or the EM-1 II or a better grade Panasonic body. Panasonic body stabilization is not as good as Olympus; historically Panasonic relied on lens stabilization.

I find the colors on my Olympus EM-1 I jpegs to be bang on.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
boot up
Old Not Bold Hiker



Joined: 12 Dec 2006
Posts: 4747 | TRs
Location: Bend Oregon
boot up
Old Not Bold Hiker
PostThu Feb 01, 2018 9:46 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb wrote:
Panasonic body stabilization is not as good as Olympus; historically Panasonic relied on lens stabilization.

I find the colors on my Olympus EM-1 I jpegs to be bang on.

Panasonic has stepped up their game in image stabilization.  They now have combined in body and in lens in the newest offering.   One of my favorite lens is an Oly 9-18 that works quite well with my G85 in-body stabilization.   

If you don't do any post processing, there is nothing that competes with Oly out of camer jpegs.

I have come close to switching to Oly M4/3 but there are tradeoffs on any camera and I always seem to end up with Panny these days, at least in my budget range.   It is nice knowing I can switch brand without having to toss out any lens.

--------------
friluftsliv
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
shoulderseason
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Jul 2017
Posts: 6 | TRs
Location: Seattle
shoulderseason
Member
PostTue Feb 06, 2018 12:51 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Thanks all -- you're re-opened pandora's box on camera choices ;-).

boot up wrote:
Any reason you aren't considering micro-4/3 format for a hiking camera?

A year ago, I would have learned toward an m4/3 and actually started looking there. The range of lenses (and being able to switch body brand without dealing with an adapter or new lenses) is nice. The point about the sensor/lens size trade off is well taken.

... but so far, I've liked the out-of-camera JPG samples on the Fujifilm cameras more than samples I've seen from Olympus or Panasonic -- though I know that's a matter of taste and its a small enough difference that I have trouble saying what I like more.

gb wrote:
The EM-10 III is a dumbed down camera, try the EM-5 II or the EM-1 II or a better grade Panasonic body.

I had liked the size of the E-M10 III which made it still a close contender other than liking the X series output a bit better and the controls on the X-T20 more. I hadn't really looked at the E-M5 II. I think body size and weight deterred me, along with the contrast detect autofocus. It seemed like a shame to carry a larger and heavier body for a smaller sensor, though I wasn't considering that the m4/3 camera could have smaller lenses for the same range.

Now that I look at it again, I think I should probably find an E-M5 II in-store to get my hands on this weekend.

One other question -- how much do you all find that weather sealing matters? With all-in-ones, I haven't worried much about it, especially since it's been easy to keep them enclosed in a case. Should I be paying more attention here?

--------------
Flickr | Travel & hiking blog
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 4897 | TRs

gb
Member
PostTue Feb 06, 2018 8:17 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
The big saving in weight is in the lenses. For instance, I own the high quality Panasonic 35-100 F2.8 zoom (70-200). It weighs 330 grams. My 12-40 F2.8 weighs 382 grams, my 8mm F1.8 FE 315 grams, my 60mm macro is 182 grams. I even have a 75-300 (150-600) Olympus zoom that I'll carry if I expect good wildlife. And no tripod except post sunset. In a body buy one that feels good in hand. My EM-1 I has a very nice grip. And the EVF on m EM-1 I is much better than older OVF's.

The image stabilization is great. I routinely shoot down to 1/13th to 1/30th of a second. Some swear you can shoot one second handheld.

All of the "Pro" lenses are weather sealed. That means splash and dust proof. I really don't shoot much in rain because of rain on the front of the lens but I would expect you shouldn't have trouble shooting in rain. With light rain I'll occasionally shoot and I'm not worried about my lenses or body.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
shoulderseason
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Jul 2017
Posts: 6 | TRs
Location: Seattle
shoulderseason
Member
PostTue Jul 10, 2018 7:37 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
After lots of looking and trying various bodies out in person, I ended up with an EM-5 mk II and the Olympus 12-50mm (24-100mm) as a starter lens. I tried it a bit locally and then gave it it's first real test on the Tour du Mont Blanc over the last week and a half.

Some reflections:
  • while I slightly preferred the output of the Fujifilm XT-20 and the Sony A6500, the EM-5 won out for (a) easier controls over both (and much, much better compared to the A6500), (b) IBIS (compared to the XT-20), and (c) the smaller and lighter lenses for comparable ranges and brightness.

  • at first I tried carrying it in a bag, like I was used to with the RX100. That was sort of silly and I switched to the Peak Designs Capture Clip. That has overall worked well though my camera is now slightly scuffed up (which was bound to happen anyway).

  • We had a day that was a seemingly endless series of short showers followed by dry. I was particularly happy for the weatherproofing there.

  • When the Olympus JPEG engine gets it right, wow. But it also has some really weird quirks -- mostly in stripping details out and weird white balance choices. Both of these seem addressable with settings, though I really wish I had more time to experiment with it before I set out for the bigger trip, or that I had found some recommended settings guides (e.g., Robin Wong's) earlier.
So my overall reaction at this stage is that while the RX100 encourages me to experiment and take more photos because it is always at hand, the EM-5 encourages me to experiment and take more photos because it's so easy to try different things once it is in my hand.

--------------
Flickr | Travel & hiking blog
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Gil
Member
Member


Joined: 29 Sep 2004
Posts: 3680 | TRs

Gil
Member
PostWed Jul 11, 2018 6:46 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I also bought an EM-5 recently with a 20mm f1.7 lens to use as my main "on the trail" camera, with my DSLR and lenses tucked away. It's been difficult getting used to the EVF -- still prefer seeing the actual image, but the Olympus is fine for what I'm using it for. I also bought an adapter so I can use my Nikon lenses on the EM-5 and that works surprisingly well. The adapter has a built-in tripod mount, which makes balancing the light body with heavier lenses pretty easy.

--------------
Friends help the miles go easier.
Klahini
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Photography Talk > x-t20 bag/case for hiking and backpacking?
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy