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timberghost
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PostWed Sep 05, 2018 12:25 pm 
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Looks like proper steps were taken
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PostThu Sep 06, 2018 10:53 pm 
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True, but it remains to be seen what degree of efficacy WDFW's tactics will have.

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timberghost
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PostFri Sep 07, 2018 3:02 am 
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Well it seems to be a common issue with each state that has these WAG or wolf advisory groups. Which are composed of all different organizations. They collectively make a decision then one of them ends up challenging that decision in court even though they were part of the process. Costing the state and tax payers money
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PostFri Sep 07, 2018 7:30 pm 
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Friday September 07, 2018 19:46 PDT

WDFW WILDLIFE PROGRAM

Gray Wolf Update


Two new updates on wolf activities are available on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website HERE

WDFW, in their update of 09/07/18 wrote:
Between Sept. 5-7, WDFW documented five confirmed wolf depredations on calves in the territory formerly occupied by the Profanity Peak pack. The depredations resulted in one dead and four injured calves.

Local WDFW staff are working to document the details of those depredations and identify additional non-lethal measures to deter further wolf depredations. 

WDFW Director Kelly Susewind said the situation is evolving quickly, and more details will be provided early next week on the depredations, the deterrent measures used in the area, and the department’s response.

The department estimates the new pack has three or four adults and two or three pups.

-WDFW-

=========================================================

Ski, in a previous post wrote:
True, but it remains to be seen what degree of efficacy WDFW's tactics will have.

Isn't the Profanity Pack the one they took out about a year ago?

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timberghost
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PostSun Sep 09, 2018 12:13 pm 
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Another outside group steps in
https://www.king5.com/article/tech/science/environment/conservation-groups-divide-over-killing-of-washington-wolves/281-592045716
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PostSun Sep 09, 2018 5:48 pm 
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I'm savoring the irony of Mitch Friedman objecting to CBD's lawsuit. lol.gif

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PostTue Sep 11, 2018 11:07 pm 
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Tuesday September 11, 2018 20:34 PDT

WDFW GRAY WOLF UPDATE

Multiple wolf depredations by wolves in Ferry County documented by WDFW


On September 5-7, 2018, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) documented five livestock depredations by an unnamed wolf pack in Ferry County (see update on June 1, 2018, here). The wolves are occupying the same general area as the Old Profanity Territory (OPT) in 2016 and the northern portion of the Sherman pack territory in 2017. WDFW officials confirmed that one or more wolves from the OPT pack were responsible for the deaths of one calf and injuring four calves on a U.S. Forest Service grazing allotment.

Identifying the new pack

The department documented the presence of a new pack in the area in May. The department notified the producer and shared the general location of the suspected den site with them. The department notified the public about the unnamed pack on June 1, 2018.  The estimated pack size from recent surveys indicate the OPT pack has three to four adults and likely no more than two pups.

Implementation of non-lethal deterrence measures

Given the history of wolf-livestock conflict in the area, the department coordinated with the producer and a WDFW contracted range rider on the deployment of non-lethal deterrents for the 2018 grazing season. That plan included:

1. Using range riders,

2. Calving away from areas occupied by wolves,

3. Delaying the turnout of cows and calves until July 10, so calves are larger,

4. Removing or securing livestock carcasses that may attract wolves, and

5. Removing sick or injured livestock from the grazing allotment.

The department believes the use of range riders is one of the best proactive deterrents for this particular operation and the remote, rugged, large acreage open range country. A typical day for a range rider includes locating livestock, checking them for stress or injury, moving the animals to different locations (if agreed to by the producer) based on grazing needs and/or carnivore activity, locating smaller groups of livestock that may wonder too far from the rest of the herd or desired grazing locations, and communicating with the producer and WDFW regarding livestock behavior, predator signs, depredations and other relevant information.

Even though grazing allotments can cover thousands of acres, livestock movements are associated within smaller pastures and usually reflect the type of forage available at different elevations. Range riders focus their activities in the areas where the livestock are actually present. Areas where wolf-livestock conflict occurs is usually smaller than the full allotment, and wolves can be effectively influenced by the presence of range riders.

From fall 2017 through the 2018 grazing season, WDFW contracted for range riding services in this area. Range riders started in April 2018 patrolling the allotments where cattle were going to be turned out, checking for predator sign.  Range riders spend five days working in April, 24 days in May, and 54 days in June (note, multiple range riders sometimes work on the same day). Range riders worked other allotments during some of these days as well.  After turnout, range riders worked 64 days in July (range rider days are not available yet for August and early September). The department verifies the provision of range riding services through field inspections and phone conversations, and receives monthly logs from WDFW range riding contractors.

The producer’s calving operation takes place in the Columbia Basin, away from the allotment and from the territory of other wolf packs. The cow-calf pairs are trucked to the allotment, where they are released for the grazing season, which runs from May through September/October.

The producer calves early so calves are larger, and delayed the turnout of livestock until July 10, 2018 (normally June 1st turnout when calves are generally larger -- over 200 lbs.), and ungulate fawns/calves are on the landscape to provide alternate prey for wolves.  WDFW personnel who worked in the area confirmed cattle were present on the landscape consistent with the date described by the producer. 

Time line of events

On June 2, 2018, WDFW staff trapped and placed a Global Positioning System (GPS) collar on an adult male wolf in the OPT pack.  By utilizing the GPS point locations during the month of June and most of July, WDFW determined a possible den location on United States Forest Service (USFS) grazing allotment, north and adjacent to the allotment where the depredations occurred. Range riders began receiving location data from the collared male wolf starting around July 23, 2018 and utilized this information to check for wolf activity.  GPS location data from the collared male wolf suggested a possible rendezvous site had been established by the pack about two and a half miles northwest of the den location during the first two weeks of August.  This location was north of the allotment where the wolf depredations occurred.  By mid-August, the GPS locations from the collared male suggested a high use area, most likely a new rendezvous site, roughly five and half miles southeast from the previous possible rendezvous site.  This area is located in the grazing allotment where the wolf depredations occurred.  The identified high use area of the OPT pack was in an area where the livestock have been grazing within the allotment.  Based upon this information, WDFW staff ramped up coordination with the producer and contract range riders to manage the potential for wolf-livestock conflict.

The Ferry County Wildlife Specialist started going to point locations of the collared OPT male wolf after the removal of the Togo wolf.  He found a calf carcass on August 20th, which was determined by WDFW staff to be an unknown cause of death.  A WDFW contract range rider located two calf carcasses on August 26th and after investigation, were determined to be an unknown cause of death. The August 20th depredation remains consisted of a portion of one leg bone, portion of lower spine and pelvic bones and one hoof.  No meat remained and bones were chewed into smaller pieces.  Remains of this calf were left on site.  The August 26th depredations were of two carcasses.  Carcass one remains were chewed up rib bones, leg bones, small portion of hide, portions of head and jawbone.  The leg bones and small portion of hide was removed from the landscape and soaked in water for further investigation.  No meat remained on the rib bones or head and jawbones and were chewed up so left on site.  Carcass two remains were portions of a head and jaw.  Remains were left on site as no meat remained and it was chewed up.  All three depredations were unknown cause of death.

Little wolf sign was present in this portion of the grazing allotment prior to cattle turnout (July 10, 2018), although GPS locations of the collared male started to accumulate in this area around the middle of August.  Range rider presence increased in this new high use area checking cattle behavior (evening, night, and daily) and monitoring salting sites for cattle activity.

In both cases, these carcasses were found by range riders actively following collar locations to ascertain if there was an increase in wolf-livestock overlap to monitor and respond to the potential for wolf-livestock overlap and then taking action to reduce the likelihood of conflict.  While finding carcasses after they have been scavenged might suggest lack of diligence, the opposite is true here.  This landscape is vast and finding a dead calf is not easy.  Often it is based upon smell after decomposition begins, or the presence of scavengers is noted.  Also, a carcass can be reduced to a bone pile relatively swiftly.   

After the August identification of dead calves and the GPS collar data locations demonstrating high wolf/livestock overlap, the producer and range riders responded by ramping up their presence, including range rider shifts throughout the day and during nighttime hours.  The producer and range riders started to started push livestock west towards adjacent grazing allotments August 21st and that effort continues.

The observed activity was in an area where the prior Profanity wolf pack (in 2016), and the prior Sherman wolf pack (in 2017), previously depredated on cattle.  Data collected in August of 2018 reflected this was a new high use area in mid-August by the current OPT wolf pack.  WDFW contract range riders reported little wolf activity in this area prior to cattle turnout July 10, 2018. 

Salt licks are located throughout the grazing allotments in approved locations by the USFS.  Salt licks are present in the current location of the cattle and in multiple locations throughout the grazing allotments to assist in moving and holding cattle in new locations.  Livestock have grazed these allotments for generations (75 years), with salt blocks in the same location every year to assist with cattle movements. 

In conference with the producer, the department discussed whether salt blocks should be removed from locations with high wolf-livestock overlap as this has been a concern in past wolf depredation scenarios in this area.  They concluded that this would likely be of little help in the present circumstances.  Even when salt blocks are moved, cattle continue to visit and linger at these sites due to the amount of salt in the ground from years of salting.  The herd memory of salt blocks also tends to home them to these sites, and if salt blocks are missing, the experience is that cattle actually linger while searching for the salt blocks. 

Furthermore, the presence of salt blocks at alternate locations means there may be other reasons cattle return to an original location rather than being attracted to the salt blocks alone.   The grazing pattern is to start cattle in the lower country and move to the higher country towards the end of summer and early fall.  The producer and range riders continue to push cattle west towards the adjacent allotments with approximately 20 head of cattle remaining in the high wolf use area.

Wolf depredation on livestock

On September 4, 2018, range riders contacted the Ferry County Wildlife Specialist, who coordinated with WDFW staff about two injured calves in the OPT pack area.  WDFW staff investigated on September 5, 2018 and confirmed the injuries on both calves were caused by wolves.   That afternoon, a dead calf was located in the same vicinity of the other injured calves and an investigation by WDFW staff confirmed wolves had killed it. 

· Depredation #1: The calf suffered bite lacerations and puncture wounds to the right hindquarter, hamstring, and flank. Bite lacerations and puncture wounds were also present on the left flank and just above the left hock. Locations of injuries are consistent with wolf attack on cattle. Based in the evidence and factors from the investigation, WDFW staff conducting the investigation classified the injured calf as a confirmed wolf depredation.

· Depredation #2 – The calf suffered bite lacerations and puncture wounds to the left hindquarter and the front shoulder under the leg. Locations of injuries are consistent with wolf attack on cattle.  Based in the evidence and factors from the investigation, WDFW staff conducting the investigation classified the injured calf as a confirmed wolf depredation.

· Depredation #3 – The dead calf had bite puncture wounds and hemorrhaging to rear right leg. Multiple sets of wolf tracks present at the carcass. Multiple wolf-livestock interactions occurred near carcass.  Based in the evidence and factors from the investigation, WDFW staff conducting the investigation classified the dead calf as a confirmed wolf depredation.

On September 6, 2018, another injured calf was located and the subsequent investigation by WDFW staff confirmed that wolves had injured it. On September 7, 2018, range riders located a fifth calf and WDFW staff also confirmed that the calf had been injured by wolves in the OPT pack.  One injured calf was removed from the grazing allotment.  Further medical attention was not needed for the remaining injured calves. The September 6 confirmed wolf mortality of a calf remains were placed in the Department of Transportation Trout Lake carcass pit.  . 

. Depredation #4 - The calf had bite lacerations and bite puncture wounds to both hindquarters and groin areas. On right rear leg, hemorrhaging to underlying tissue as indicated by swelling and limping. Location of injuries consistent with wolf attack on cattle. Based in the evidence and factors from the investigation, WDFW staff conducting the investigation classified the injured calf as a confirmed wolf depredation.

· Depredation #5 - The calf had multiple bite lacerations to the rear legs with most of the injuries on the inside of the legs. The most severe injury was on the rear left leg. The calf had multiple puncture wounds and a large lump of swelling on the leg.  Necrotic muscle tissue caused by the bite was removed.  Based in the evidence and factors from the investigation, WDFW staff conducting the investigation classified the injured calf as a confirmed wolf depredation.

Responsive deterrence measures

Responsive deterrent measures were implemented after the first known depredations including increasing the number of WDFW contract range riders focusing on the high wolf-livestock overlap area, spending additional time at salting areas within high wolf -livestock overlap area, and continuing to attempt to push cattle to different allotments.   

Fox lights were placed at two salting areas September 9, 2018 and two at a cattle-gathering site on September 10th.  Fox lights have not been utilized at salt sites before, so department staff thought this would be a responsive deterrent measure to attempt even though the majority of the cattle are being pushed to neighboring allotments.

The depredations in this area happened in quick succession, and department staff have spent several days gathering information, assisting the producer, providing reports, and considering next steps.

-WDFW-

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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timberghost
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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 4:09 am 
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Its surprising this businessman can remain in business with all this time and money spent. Sounds like he has made a strong effort to co exist. Too bad there wasn't another food source left with the deer, moose and elk population diminished so much. I guess since the cattle are slow its an easy target.  Must be tough for him to watch his cattle taken in such a way.
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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 11:46 am 
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Wednesday September 12, 2018 12:27 PDT

WDFW WILDLIFE PROGRAM

Gray Wolf Update


A new update on wolf activities is available on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website HERE

WDFW, in its Wolf Management update of Sept. 12, 2018 wrote:
WDFW Director Kelly Susewind today authorized department staff to lethally remove wolves from a new pack that has repeatedly preyed on cattle on federal grazing lands in the Kettle River Range of Ferry County.

WDFW staff have confirmed that on six separate occasions since Sept. 4, one or more members of the Old Profanity Territory (OPT) pack killed one calf and injured five others on a U.S. Forest Service (USFS) grazing allotment.  The pack occupies the same general area as the Profanity Peak pack in 2016.

Five of the OPT depredations are described in a Sept. 11 report available below. The sixth incident, confirmed after the report was published, resulted in an injured calf, which has been removed from the grazing allotment with its mother.

Susewind authorized “incremental” removal of wolves from the pack, consistent with the state’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and the lethal removal provisions of the department’s wolf-livestock interaction protocol. Both the plan and protocol define initial incremental removal as meaning one or two wolves.

Under the protocol, WDFW can consider lethal action against wolves if department staff confirm three predations by wolves on livestock within 30 days, or four within 10 months. Depredations confirmed by WDFW in the past week meet the first criterion.

Based on a recent court order, the department must provide one business day (8 court hours) advance public notice before initiating lethal action on wolves. Consequently, the department will initiate lethal removal efforts no earlier than the afternoon of Thursday, Sept. 13.

WDFW will use humane lethal removal methods consistent with state and federal laws. The objective is to use the best methods available while considering human safety, humaneness to wolves, swift completion of the removal, weather, efficacy, and cost. Likely options in this case include shooting from a helicopter, trapping, and shooting from the ground.

As called for in the plan and protocol, incremental removal includes periods of active removals or attempts to remove wolves followed by periods of evaluation to determine if pack behavior has changed.

The department documented the presence of the pack in May and notified the public on June 1. The affected livestock producer and USFS were also notified. Recent surveys indicate the pack includes three or four adult wolves and two pups.  Wildlife managers have monitored the pack’s movements since June, when the adult male was captured and fitted with a tracking collar.

The protocol requires livestock producers to employ specified non-lethal measures to deter wolves from preying on livestock before WDFW will consider lethal action. In this case, the producer employed several approved deterrents:

•Using range riders to keep watch over his herd.

•Calving outside of occupied wolf range

•Delaying turning out cattle until July 10 – a month later than usual – when calving is finished and the calves are larger and less prone to predation.

•Removing or securing livestock carcasses to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd.

•Removing sick and injured livestock from the grazing area.

Between Aug. 20 and 26, before WDFW had confirmed any depredations by wolves, three dead calves were found on the grazing allotment. The cause of their deaths could not be determined because most of their flesh and hides were gone.

At that point, the range riders increased their patrols and helped the producer attempt to move the livestock away from the area where they suspected wolf activity.

The producer is continuing his efforts to move the cattle, and WDFW deployed Foxlights to deter wolves from preying on those remaining at the site.

The goal of lethal removal as described in the Wolf Conservation and Management Plan is to manage wolf-livestock conflicts to minimize livestock losses without undermining the recovery of a sustainable wolf population. The purpose of the OPT lethal action is to change wolf pack behavior to reduce the potential for continued depredations on livestock while continuing to promote wolf recovery. More information is available online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/gray_wolf/livestock/final_protocol_for_wolf-livestock_interactions_jun012017.pdf.

Consistent with the terms of the plan and protocol, the rationale for lethal removal of OPT wolves is as follows:

1.WDFW has documented six wolf depredations by the pack within the last 30 days. All of the incidents were confirmed wolf depredations, which resulting in one dead calf and five injured calves.  All six depredations in this area occurred since Sept. 4.

2.At least two (2) pro-active deterrence measures and various responsive measures, put in place after the initial depredations, have failed to meet the goal of changing pack behavior to reduce the potential for continued predation on livestock;

3.WDFW expects depredations to continue based of the history of depredations;

4.The department has documented the use of appropriate deterrents and has informed the public in a timely manner, as described in the protocol.

5.The lethal removal of wolves is not expected to harm the wolf population’s ability to reach recovery objectives statewide or within the state’s eastern recovery region. Comparing the actual level of wolf mortality to that modeled in the Wolf Conservation and Management Plan (appendices G and H), actual average wolf mortality is about 8.6 animals or 11 percent of the estimated population from 2011-2018. This level is well below the 28 percent baseline annual mortality assumed in the wolf plan model before any simulated wolf removals, which incorporates a 30 percent lethal removal mortality in addition to the baseline mortality.  The modeling assumed the regional wolf population was at the regional recovery objective. In fact, the wolf population in the eastern recovery region has increased to more than three times the regional recovery objective.

The Department will keep the public informed about this activity through weekly updates, and will issue a final report on any lethal removal actions after the operation has concluded.

"This is a very difficult situation, especially given the history of wolf-livestock conflict in this area," Susewind said. "We are committed to working with a diversity of stakeholders in a collaborative process to seek other creative and adaptive solutions to prevent future losses of wolves and livestock."

The presence of the OPT pack was documented after WDFW completed its annual survey of the state’s wolf population in March. The survey identified 22 wolf packs and a minimum of 122 wolves. Annual surveys have shown the population growing at a rate of about 30 percent each year.

More information about wolf management actions and the Old Profanity Territory pack is available below.

-WDFW-

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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 11:49 am 
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WDFW, in its Wolf Management update of Sept. 12, 2018 wrote:
The purpose of the OPT lethal action is to change wolf pack behavior to reduce the potential for continued depredations on livestock while continuing to promote wolf recovery.

Where has it been documented that this strategy has any degree of efficacy?
Has lethal removal of pack members changed wolf behavior among other (remaining) members of the same pack?

(Questions addressed to office of WDFW Director Kelly Susewind 09/12/18 12:50 PDT / phone. Currently awaiting response.)

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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 2:33 pm 
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I got off the phone about half an hour ago with Mick Cope, who called me from his office at WDFW.
Apparently there ARE documented instances (from wildlife management agencies in other western states) in which lethal removal of selected wolf pack members has resulted in behavioral changes in remaining pack members, and subsequent abatement of livestock predation.
As well, Mr. Cope informs me that there have been a few instances (in Washington State) in which lethal removal of pack members has resulted in behavioral changes in remaining pack members and reductions/cessation of livestock predation by remaining pack members.

So while we do not have any “peer reviewed studies” to refer to, there are apparently examples where this strategy has had some positive effect.

All fine and well, but I still question the overall monetary cost* when we’ve got teachers standing out in front of Truman Middle School (Tacoma) and Wainwright Intermediate School (Fircrest) waving picket signs.
There’s something wrong with that picture.

(* Seven of the eleven members of the “Profanity Pack” were killed by WDFW during the summer of 2016 at a cost of $135,000.00 according to an article in the Spokane Spokesman-Review HERE: http://www.spokesman.com/blogs/outdoors/2017/jan/13/profanity-peak-wolf-pack-removal-cost-state-135k/ - the article cites dollar figures for some other incidents as well. )

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PostFri Sep 14, 2018 8:27 am 
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Thursday September 13, 2018 16:13 PDT

WDFW WILDLIFE PROGRAM

Gray Wolf Update


A new update on wolf activities is available on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website HERE.

WDFW, in its update of Sept. 13, 2018 wrote:
On Sept. 7, 2018, the department documented a new depredation on livestock by the Togo pack on a U.S. Forest Service grazing allotment in Ferry County, resulting in an injured calf. That brought the total number of confirmed depredations by the pack to seven since November 2017.

When the WDFW field staff confirmed the latest depredation, the department was evaluating the pack’s behavior after lethally removing the adult male wolf on Sept. 2, 2018. That action was taken according to the lethal removal provisions in the department’s wolf-livestock interaction protocol, which allows the department to consider taking lethal action against wolves when department staff confirm three predations by wolves on livestock within 30 days, or four within 10 months.

With the confirmation of a sixth depredation on Aug. 18, 2018, the Togo pack’s behavior met both of those criteria. Two days later, WDFW notified the public that non-lethal measures had not deterred the pack from preying on livestock and that the WDFW director had authorized incremental lethal removal of one adult wolf to help change the pack’s pattern of behavior.

Under that authorization, the department removed one adult male wolf from the Togo pack on Sept. 2, 2018, and initiated an evaluation period of the pack’s behavior. Following the wolf’s removal, WDFW estimated the pack included one adult female and two pups.

The Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and the department’s protocol indicate that post-removal evaluation period should consider any depredations that take place after one or more wolves are removed from a pack. WDFW determined that the seventh depredation by the Togo pack is new – not one that likely occurred during or before the removal period – allowing for the removal of additional wolves from the pack.

In the current situation, there is no clear path for removing the remaining adult female in the pack to address the repeated depredations without the risk of orphaning the pups.  The department will continue to evaluate the situation, and will continue to work with the producer to implement non-lethal deterrents.

Meanwhile the livestock producer involved has continued to employ proactive non-lethal deterrence measures including:

•Keeping cattle on private fenced lands.

•Checking on the cattle multiple times every day during feedings.

•Removing sick or injured cattle from the area to avoid attracting wolves.

•Using range riders periodically in 2006 and 2017.

•Receiving locations of nearby collared wolves via WDFW's Sensitive Wildlife Data Sharing Agreement to avoid conflicts between wolves and cattle.

-WDFW-

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PostFri Sep 14, 2018 8:36 am 
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Going above and beyond methods of deterrent it appears
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PostFri Sep 14, 2018 5:38 pm 
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Friday September 14, 2018 16:17 PDT

WDFW WILDLIFE PROGRAM

Gray Wolf Update


A new update on wolf activities is available on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website HERE

WDFW, in its Wolf Update of Sept. 14, 2018 wrote:
Judge denies temporary injunction for OPT wolf removal

A Thurston County Superior Court judge has rejected a request for a temporary injunction that would have prohibited the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) from lethally removing wolves from a pack in Ferry County.

As a result, the department can remove wolves from the Old Profanity Territory pack as authorized Sept. 12 by WDFW Director Kelly Susewind. Information about the authorization appears in a separate update.

Two organizations, the Center for Biological Diversity and Cascadia Wildlands, sought the injunction several hours after the department announced Susewind’s authorization.

Judge Murphy said the petitioners had not met the criteria for temporary injunctive relief under the state Administrative Procedures Act. However, she said the court would expedite a hearing on the merits of the petitioners’ underlying complaint.

Susewind authorized “incremental removal” of wolves from the OPT pack after WDFW staff documented the pack’s involvement in six confirmed livestock depredations since Sept. 4, 2018. Under WDFW’s wolf-livestock interaction protocol, the department can consider and take lethal action if department staff confirm three predations by wolves on livestock within 30 days or four within 10 months, in cases where non-lethal deterrents have not prevented wolf-livestock conflict.

Incremental removal is defined by both the protocol and the state’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan as the removal of one or two wolves, followed by a period of evaluation to determine whether the action has changed the pack’s pattern of predation.

-WDFW-

(* Note that in the WDFW Wolf Update of Sept. 13, 2018 the number of confirmed livestock depredations by the OTP pack has been confirmed to be seven since November 2017. *)

==

timberghost, referring to the producer mentioned in the Wolf Update of Sept. 13, 2018 wrote:
Going above and beyond methods of deterrent it appears

It would appear that the producer has cooperated with WDFW and followed requisite protocol per the Wolf Management Plan.

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostFri Sep 21, 2018 12:34 pm 
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Tuesday September 18, 2018 12:28 PDT

WDFW WILDLIFE PROGRAM

Gray Wolf Update


A new update on wolf activities is available on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s website HERE

WDFW, in their Wolf update of Sept. 18, 2018 wrote:
On September 16, a Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife marksman shot and killed a juvenile member of a wolf pack currently occupying the Old Profanity Territory (OPT) that has repeatedly preyed on cattle on federal grazing lands in the Kettle River Range of Ferry County.

The young wolf, weighing 50 pounds, was one of four pack members spotted that day by a WDFW helicopter crew. Identifying adults and young wolves from the air is difficult this time of year due to the size of the animals.

On Sept. 12, WDFW Director Kelly Susewind authorized “incremental” removal of wolves from the OPT pack, after confirming that one or more pack members killed one calf and injured five others from Sept. 4-7 on a U.S. Forest Service (USFS) grazing allotment.

One day after the juvenile wolf was removed, WDFW confirmed that an adult cow was killed by wolves in the same general area. WDFW staff investigating the cow carcass determined that it was likely killed prior to the removal of the wolf.  The department is currently working to determine the next option to deter wolf depredation by the OPT pack under the current incremental removal action.

This action is consistent with the state’s Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and wolf-livestock protocol, which allows the department to take lethal action after confirming three depredations by wolves on livestock within 30 days or four within 10 months.

The series of depredations from Sept. 4-7 met the first criterion, in addition to a requirement in the protocol that non-lethal deterrents were in place, but did not prevent conflict between wolves and livestock. Non-lethal deterrents employed by the livestock producer whose cattle were killed or injured by the OPT pack include:

• Using range riders to keep watch over his herd.

• Calving outside of occupied wolf range

• Delaying turning out cattle until July 10 – a month later than usual – when calving is finished and the calves are larger and less prone to predation.

• Removing or securing livestock carcasses to avoid attracting wolves to the rest of the herd.

• Removing sick and injured livestock from the grazing area.


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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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