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ainmsiul81
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ainmsiul81
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PostSat Apr 13, 2019 5:56 am 
I have heard that, instead of using powdered butter (which tastes awful) to add calories to a freeze-dried meal, you can use cocoa butter (like the organic Kakosi brand).

Has anyone here actually done this?  I see that it comes in chunks.

Do you have to break the chunks apart before you set out on the trail, to make it easier to melt when added to hot water and a freeze-dried meal?

Will it stay solid on the trail, even if the temp is 80F (unlike dairy butter, of course)?

Thanks.

Mac

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Anne Elk
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PostSat Apr 13, 2019 1:24 pm 
The melting point of cocoa butter is 93Ė101 įF ;  and it has more stability than milk butter, at least for long-term storage. Whether it's better may depend on your taste preferences, and cost difference.   Lots of nutritional info available online for a a comparison.

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"There are yahoos out there.  Itís why we canít have nice things."  - Tom Mahood
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RumiDude
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PostSat Apr 13, 2019 1:30 pm 
I use ghee, which is clarified butter which has a kinda nutty buttery flavor, though not strongly flavored. It is shelf stable and can be carried in a small little leak-free container. It is easy to make yourself from butter. I consistently get a 73% yeild of ghee from good butter. I buy the four pound pack of butter from Costco @ $10.99 and make my own. It is waaaaaaay less expensive than buying ghee already prepared. There are videos all over YouTube demonstrating how to do it.

The only caveat I offer whenever adding fat to meals is to make sure your system can handle it. Just because someone else you know can drink olive oil strait or add chunks of whatever sort of fat to their meals and suffer no ill effects does not mean you can. Try it at home before hitting the trail. If your system can't handle it, you will not be a happy camper.

Rumi

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sarbar
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PostSat Apr 13, 2019 8:57 pm 
It'll work, but know it melts a lot faster than you might think it does. (I use it in my herbalism practice and for the body care products I make). To be honest, unless you are used to it, I would avoid it - as it can overpower savory food. I'd do ghee or avocado oil instead.

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https://trailcooking.com/ Eat well on the trail.
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ainmsiul81
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PostSun Apr 14, 2019 5:00 am 
What is the melting point of ghee?
Would it stay "solid" while hiking in the summer?

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sarbar
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PostSun Apr 14, 2019 7:58 am 
Its selling point is that ghee doesn't go rancid in long term heat exposure, where as butter can. It also stays firmer since it is condensed from stick butter.

However, when it comes down to carrying fats/oils, if you can find it in a single serving packet, that is superior. If it melts, it is contained inside. Amazon has made this relatively easy to find many oils this way - and even Trader Joe's often carries 1 or 2 types in packets.

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https://trailcooking.com/ Eat well on the trail.
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RumiDude
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PostSun Apr 14, 2019 10:55 am 
This is what I put my ghee into.

Rumi

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"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."
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RumiDude
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PostSun Apr 14, 2019 11:09 am 
ainmsiul81 wrote:
What is the melting point of ghee?
Would it stay "solid" while hiking in the summer?

The melting point of ghee is about the same as cocoa butter, around 85* F - 95* F. But they start softening up at around 75* F.  Fats solid at room temp are a mix of different fatty acids which have different melting points, thus the softening and gradual melting. I generally carry my food in the center of my pack near the top and have never had much of an issue with it getting too warm. If carried in and outside pocket that might change.

Rumi

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"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."
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sarbar
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PostMon Apr 15, 2019 10:06 am 
There is a mess level however. Melted cocoa butter is way messier than ghee. You gotta figure in cleanup.

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https://trailcooking.com/ Eat well on the trail.
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Randito
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PostMon Apr 15, 2019 9:31 pm 
Just bring extra chocolate bars and eat them as dessert.

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Snuffy
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PostFri May 03, 2019 6:45 pm 
sarbar wrote:
However, when it comes down to carrying fats/oils, if you can find it in a single serving packet, that is superior. If it melts, it is contained inside. Amazon has made this relatively easy to find many oils this way - and even Trader Joe's often carries 1 or 2 types in packets.

I totally agree.  Unless you in love with the taste of straight up cocoa butter (and I can't imagine anyone who is) there are much more palatable fats/oils out there in single packets.  Coconut, olive, etc. Trader Joe's and https://www.minimus.biz/ are great resources.  I do make my own packets of butter and ghee with the food sealer (reusing larger bags I sealed for meals) by freezing it first but I know not everyone has access to one of those.

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