Forum Index > Gear Talk > What's in your first aid/emergency/repair kit? - What do you carry and why?
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catwoman
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PostFri Feb 22, 2002 9:45 pm 
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I do keep homeopathic remedies on hand but bentonite is a natural clay, not a homeopathic remedy.  I don't know what Peoples Market is, either, but if it's a natural foods store, then probably yes.  I get most of my supplements and natural stuff at Marlene's in Federal Way or Tacoma - but that's 'cuz they're in my neck o' the woods.  That bentonite clay is so awesome.  I have a neighbor that called me up on the phone last summer and mentioned he'd gotten a bee sting earlier in the day and it was throbbing and a bit swollen.  I told him to come on over and I'd fix him right up but he hesitated.  He wound up coming over and I applied the paste of bentonite clay and he said he could almost instantly feel the pain 'draining' away.  Which is exactly how it worked on me but his situation was hours after the fact.  Very awesome stuff.
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Mike Collins
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PostSat Feb 23, 2002 8:07 am 
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I always carry a 3" Ace-wrap in the emergency kit. If in poison-ivy areas I add 2% Hydrocortisone cream to the kit. Even if you know what the ivy looks like someone in the party might not.  I also add eyedrops to the kit if hiking in dry areas like in the Southwest. I have an 18G hypodermic needle for removing salmonberry or Devil's Club thorns.
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salish
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PostSat Feb 23, 2002 1:16 pm 
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Thanks Catwoman. The Peoples Market is a natural foods Coop at about 72nd & Aurora. They have tons of stuff in there so I'll take a look for bentonite clay there. I started having reactions to bee stings and certain mosquito bites a few years ago, but I'm not ready for the epenefrin (sp?) pen just yet. Appreciate your advice.
Cliff

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My short-term memory is not as sharp as it used to be.
Also, my short-term memory's not as sharp as it used to be.
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Allison
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PostSun Feb 24, 2002 11:02 pm 
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Isn't that store a PCC?

For what it's worth, I wrote a piece for the WTA mag last year on building a field repair kit, but I don't bring all the crap I talked about there.
http://www.wta.org/~wta/cgi-bin/web10.pl?Signpost+sp+da+jul016+sa

For field repair ONLY I like duct tape (I like it a LOT), seine twine (ditto), a blanket pin (heavy) a diaper pin (much sturdier than safety pins), small tube of super glue (the gel kind), needle and dental floss (also for first aid, as is the duct tape), aluminum sleeve (for tent poles, and can be what you wrap your duct tape around, since you are too cool to carry them HEAVY Nalgene bottles, and the 32 oz Gatorade bottles are not the right shape to store tape on), a razor blade, a small piece of thin wire, and a bit of adhesive backed heavy Velcro. This kit alone weighs around six ounces. I am going to be writing a thing for the magazine this year about first-aid kits and plan to explore how to combine the two. I think the two kits combined should weigh no more than eight oz, and once I toss that blanket pin, maybe I can get there. I disagree with the idea of packing a heavy FAK, I think training is the best thing you can take with you, and for most of what we do in the woods, we would just need to stabilize someone and go get help. we are not in Alaska here. Plus the fact is that a lot of First Aid is common sense, and a lot of stuff that's already in your pack will work in a pinch.

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-lol-
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PostWed Feb 27, 2002 1:08 pm 
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Dante
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PostWed Feb 27, 2002 8:39 pm 
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I'm replacing the Bic lighter/duct tape holder in my kit with one of these $13 1.6 oz. Waterproof Windproof Lighters
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Tom
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PostWed Feb 27, 2002 10:54 pm 
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LOL Dante, $13?, you can have my brand spankin' new one for $7.50 (and I'm makin' a slight profit at that price wink.gif).  I was going to return it figuring a 0.1 oz matchbook was more "kosher" than a 1.5 oz stormy lighter lol.gif.  They are very cool by the way.  The heavy guy with the pitchfork on my left shoulder was justifying keeping it if only for the gee whiz factor.
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Dante
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PostThu Feb 28, 2002 8:36 am 
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Well, they list for $16.25 (I can't believe Calibri gets $100 for a lighter at REI eek.gif ).  I did a quick google search for "solo storm" and looked through the first two or three results and $13 was the lowest price I saw.  I carry a regular size Bic anyway, so I'm only adding about a half ounce to my pack.  Why don't you bring yours to the next get together.  If I don't get one for my birthday, I'll buy yours smile.gif
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Tom
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PostSun Mar 03, 2002 8:20 pm 
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Dante, I got mine at wildernet.com.  Of course, unless you buy more stuff from them (easy to do since everything is at least 20% off) the shipping cost would eat into the savings.  They have an even lighter plastic version (no pun intented) for $5.
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pcg
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PostWed May 15, 2019 8:32 am 
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I keep Super Glue in my first aid kit and recently discovered a small disaster... the tube had been squashed and burst and the glue had leaked over some bandages. I should have foreseen this and, if I had a rigid container for my first aid kit this wouldn't have happened, but I don't.

To prevent it from happening again I wanted a small lightweight protector to put the Super Glue in. I found a solution by cutting up a used-up epoxy dispenser  - the common consumer type with a single handle that dispenses the resin and hardener from two different tubes. Just cut it apart, and remove and clean one of the clear tubes with rubbing alcohol. Now you have an instant lightweight and strong protective tube that is the perfect size to put the Super Glue in.

It's a tad too small for the wide base of the Super Glue, but that works to your benefit. Squeeze the clear epoxy tube so the widest part of the Super Glue tube will fit inside. Release and the clear tube grips the base of the Super Glue to keep it from falling out.

SG 1
SG 1
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hbb
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PostWed May 15, 2019 9:32 am 
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What prompted you to respond to a thread that has been inactive for the past 17 years?
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pcg
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PostWed May 15, 2019 10:36 am 
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No sense in starting a new thread, so I did a search for Super Glue. smile.gif
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RandyHiker
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PostWed May 15, 2019 10:50 am 
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salish wrote:
but I'm not ready for the epenefrin (sp?) pen just yet

In terms of protecting your ability to breath after an adverse reaction to a bee sting -- consider bringing some antihistamine tablets in your kit. Benadryl is the most common brand.   

A friend of mine once stumbled into a bee's nest and got hundreds of stings far from any medical facility -- he figured that was it -- he managed to survive.   He is now highly sensitive and always carries an EpiPen.
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wolffie
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PostWed May 29, 2019 11:26 am 
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last I heard, epipens were prohibitively priced by our piratized health care industry.  Benadryl has its uses; anaphylactic shock (one of the true immediate life-or-death medical emergencies) is probly not one of them, although it couldn't hurt I s'poze.

surgical tape, cloth or plastic, is great for skin and fabric repair.

Don't use Super-Glue on wounds.  It is too inflammatory, and was reformulated as Vet-bond(TM)(there are comparable alternatives)
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coldrain108
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PostWed May 29, 2019 1:21 pm 
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zip ties.  I carry about 6 small ones and a couple of larger sizes.  Great for pack repairs, broken shoe laces, snapped tent tie down, even used one to repair a water pump.  Several 1st aid applications.  You can string them together to create a longer piece.

Used one once when a crappy boot separated from its sole 15 miles from the car.  Worked great wrapped around the instep to keep the shoe in one piece.

Also useful for automotive repair improvisations.

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"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch and do nothing"  - Albert Einstein
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