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Ski
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PostTue Jul 02, 2019 5:19 pm 
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Tuesday July 2, 2019 17:12 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Chehalis River and tributaries to close to fishing


Action: Closes Chehalis River, South Fork Chehalis River, North Fork Newaukum River, South Fork Newaukum River, and Skookumchuck River to fishing.

Effective date: Immediately until further notice.

Species affected: All species.

Location: Chehalis River, South Fork Chehalis River, North Fork Newaukum River, South Fork Newaukum River and Skookumchuck River.

Reason for action: Streams and rivers where spring Chinook hold and stage through the summer are experiencing lower than normal stream flows. Spring Chinook hold and stage in the Chehalis River, South Fork Chehalis River, north and south forks of the Newaukum River and the Skookumchuck River. Low stream flows decrease holding and staging refuges and elevate vulnerability and pressure on these Chinook. Any encounters of spring Chinook could subject these fish to stress, injury, or death.

Additional information: Please see the 2019-20 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet or visit the WDFW website at wdfw.wa.gov for additional fishing opportunities and regulations.

Information contact: Chad Herring, Willapa Bay/Grays Harbor Fishery Policy Lead Region 6, 360-249-4628, ext. 299.

-WDFW-

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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alpendave
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PostSat Jul 06, 2019 6:34 am 
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treeswarper wrote:
iron wrote:
(might be wrong forum...)

if we are so concerned about the survival of salmon, why don't we just impose a moratorium on salmon harvesting for 3 years or so? seems more effective than all the bandaid solutions currently out there.

I have wondered about that for years.  We throw so much money at salmon recovery, yet folks are still fishing for salmon.  It makes it hard to believe that salmon are in trouble.

Has doing away with hatchery raised fish worked.....nope.

Rehabbing streams?   Nope.

The latest threat here is Northern Pike.  These scary looking fish are above Grand Coulee in the Columbia, but may head downstream.  The Colville tribe has been netting them to try to get rid of them.  Another question from me.  We seem to be able to overfish and drive species to extinction, but can't seem to do the same with invasive species like the pike and the other one which I cannot remember.  The latter even has a bounty on it and some folks have made quite a bit of supplemental income catching them.

Some years back I was fishing Vermilion Bay near Trout Creek, MT (on a reservoir on the Clark Fork River) and suddenly hooked something YUGE. Had no idea what it was as every time I got it within 15-20’ of shore, it would run off with 30-50 feet of line. Finally got it within 10 feet and as it took off again, created a sizable swell. Finally landed it and it was a 30” or so Pike of some sort (perhapss a Tiger Muskee). Doubtful it would have fetched a bounty (being a sterile hybrid) but easy to see how the fact that it liked hanging out at the mouth of another river, it could devour a large amount of young salmonids as they went from the Vermilion River to the Clark Fork. Maybe I shouldn’t have let it live.

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BigBrunyon
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PostTue Jul 16, 2019 9:34 pm 
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Yeah thats a eater

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i ALWAYS camp at the upper lake!
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Ski
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PostSat Aug 17, 2019 11:21 pm 
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The water is so hot in Alaska it's killing large numbers of salmon

Ryan Prior, reporting for CNN wrote:
On July 7, a major salmon stream on the west side of the Cook Inlet registered 81.7 degrees


(* but hey, there's no such thing as "global warming" or "climate change", right? dizzy.gif )

Dave Workman, in another thread far far away wrote:
Some people are world class stupid, and you can't fix that.


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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Pyrites
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PostSun Aug 18, 2019 9:02 pm 
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Ski

I’d hate to say it, but the trend is for warmer, and warmer still. I don’t think anyone would be shocked if same stream recorded a warmer temp within next five or ten years.

Temperatures more associated with Klamath River salmon kills far to the S than Alaska.
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Doppelganger
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PostMon Aug 19, 2019 8:19 am 
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Ski wrote:
The water is so hot in Alaska it's killing large numbers of salmon

Ryan Prior, reporting for CNN wrote:
On July 7, a major salmon stream on the west side of the Cook Inlet registered 81.7 degrees


I saw a story of a mass die off in Tutka Bay last week but conflicting stories have emerged since the die off was initially reported. The executive director of the Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association claims that the Tutka Bay die off (and only this specific incident, he makes no reference to any other events or locations) was due to a seine net incident.
https://www.homernews.com/news/tutka-bay-lagoon-fish-kill-caused-by-broken-net-not-ocean-warming/

The CNN article refers to die off events due to increased heat across a wider area, in the Koyukuk River as well as an unnamed tributary on the west side of the Cook Inlet (Tutka Bay Lagoon Fish Hatchery is on the east side of the Cook Inlet, along the SE coast of the Kenai Peninsula). Considering the scale of the Tutka Bay die off, I truly do hope that particular die off was a one time fishing/farming accident. Not optimistic about the long term though frown.gif
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Ski
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PostSun Sep 29, 2019 8:37 am 
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Wednesday September 25, 2019 17:21 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Salmon and steelhead fishing closes on most of the Columbia River


OLYMPIA – Most of the Columbia River will close to all recreational salmon and steelhead fishing beginning Thursday, Sept. 26, state fishery managers have announced.

The closure comes at the tail end of a challenging year on the Columbia that saw low returns for many salmon and steelhead runs, said Bill Tweit, special assistant with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). Despite those challenges, fishery managers still expect to meet conservation goals laid out at the beginning of the year.

“Despite record low numbers of summer steelhead, and poor ocean conditions, we have worked hard to offer meaningful fall Chinook fisheries in the Columbia, both above and below Bonneville,” Tweit said. “Offering those opportunities while meeting conservation guidelines is always a difficult balancing act, and one that we take very seriously.”

Fishery managers from Washington and Oregon will have to reduce the Columbia River commercial harvest to account for the number of upriver bright Chinook caught during the fall season.

Buoy 10, at the mouth of the Columbia River, will remain open to recreational anglers for coho retention.

“The Buoy 10 fishery has a negligible impact on the number of Chinook making their way upriver, and is still providing good opportunity for coho,” Tweit said.

The closure extends from a line projected from Rocky Point on the Washington bank through Red Buoy 44 to navigation marker 2 at Tongue Point on the Oregon bank, upstream to Highway 395 in Pasco. The Hanford Reach salmon fishery will remain open as it is not affected by this rule change.

Steelhead fishing will also close in these same areas, as the upriver steelhead run size is below forecast, and several hatchery programs within the Snake and Clearwater river basins are projected to fall short of broodstock collection goals.

For more information, see the 2019-20 Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet or view the rule changes at WDFW’s emergency rules website: https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/erules/

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is the state agency tasked with preserving, protecting, and perpetuating fish, wildlife, and ecosystems, while providing sustainable fishing and hunting opportunities.

-WDFW-

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Thursday September 26, 2019 14:02 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Hanford Reach steelhead fishery to remain closed


Action: Closes steelhead fishing.

Effective date: Oct. 1 through Dec. 31, 2019.

Species affected: Steelhead.

Location: Highway 395 Bridge (Kennewick/Pasco) upstream to the old Hanford townsite powerline crossing.

Reason for action: Through Sept. 24, the 2019 steelhead return is the fourth-lowest return on record since 1962 for both the Upper Columbia River and Snake River. Adult returns of Ringold Springs Hatchery-origin steelhead are currently tracking at less than 50 percent of the 2018 return. The closure is necessary to ensure sufficient numbers of steelhead will be available to meet hatchery broodstock production needs.

Additional information: This year's return of Ringold Springs Hatchery steelhead is expected to be the lowest return on record over the past 20 years. All returning steelhead will be needed for broodstock to meet the production goal of 180,000 juvenile steelhead scheduled for release in 2021. The Hanford Reach is currently closed to steelhead retention, but was scheduled to open Oct. 1. Under this rule change, steelhead retention will remain closed through Dec. 31.

-WDFW-

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Thursday September 26, 2019 14:11 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Drano Lake to close to all fishing


Action: Closes Drano Lake to all fishing.

Effective date: Sept. 29, 2019 until further notice.

Species affected: All fish species.

Location: In the waters downstream of markers on point of land downstream and across from Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery and upstream of the Highway 14 Bridge.

Reason for action:  The current estimate of fall Chinook salmon that will return to Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery is below the number needed to meet the 2019 broodstock collection goal. Closing the fishing season in Drano Lake will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure future hatchery returns.

Additional information: WDFW will continue coordinating with National Fish Hatchery staff to monitor the hatchery return and determine if further fishery modification is needed.

-WDFW-

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Thursday September 26, 2019 17:17 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Sections of the Snake River close to fishing for fall Chinook


Action: Closes salmon fishing in some areas of the Snake River.

Effective date: Sept. 29, 2019

Species affected: Fall Chinook salmon.

Locations and daily limits:

A) Snake River from the mouth (Burbank to Pasco Railroad Bridge at Snake River mile 1.25) to Lower Granite Dam: Closed, with the exception of Section B (below).

B) Lyons Ferry Bubble Fishery: From the red river marker (Marker 28) on the south shore of the Snake River upstream to the Highway 261 Bridge (~1.4 miles)

Open through Oct. 31. Daily limit 6 adult hatchery (adipose fin-clipped) Chinook, no daily limit for jack Chinook; release all other salmon.
C) Clarkston: Snake River from the downstream edge of the large power lines crossing the Snake River (just upstream from West Evans Road on the south shore) upstream to Couse Creek Boat Ramp

Open through Oct. 13. Daily limit 6 adult Chinook with up to one non adipose fin-clipped adult, no daily limit for jack Chinook; release all other salmon.
D) Couse Creek Boat Ramp to the Oregon State Line

Open through Oct. 31. Daily limit 6 adult Chinook with up to one non adipose fin-clipped adult, no daily limit for jack Chinook; release all other salmon.
Reason for action: A significant downgrade in the B-index steelhead forecast requires additional protection of returning hatchery and natural origin fish. The Fall Chinook return is large enough to continue to allow some harvest opportunities within the Snake River fisheries, while providing protection of B-index steelhead.

Based on the new B-index steelhead forecast, Washington fishery managers are closing the steelhead fishery below Couse Creek Boat Ramp Oct. 1 to protect B-index steelhead. WDFW feels it is necessary to also limit impacts to B-index steelhead from our fall Chinook fisheries. These changes will help to ensure that sufficient numbers of both wild and hatchery B-index fish return to their natal tributaries and hatcheries of origin in Idaho. WDFW will continue to monitor the steelhead return.

Additional information: Anglers may not continue to fish for salmon or steelhead after either the steelhead or adult salmon daily limit has been retained.

The Chinook fishery is open seven days per week. Adipose fin-clipped fish must have a healed scar at the location of the missing fin.

Barbless hooks are required when fishing for Chinook or steelhead in the Snake River.

Anglers may not remove any salmon or steelhead from the water if it is not or cannot be retained as part of the daily limit.

All steelhead must be immediately released unharmed in Sections A-C (steelhead fishing is closed in these areas). In Section D all unmarked steelhead must be released unharmed (steelhead fishing is open with daily limit of one hatchery fish).

WDFW will continue to monitor the steelhead return. If additional conservation measures need to be taken, or additional opportunity can be offered without negatively impacting wild or hatchery steelhead abundances, seasons and harvest rules may be adjusted in coming months. Please continue to check emergency rules if you are planning to fish for steelhead within the affected area.

-WDFW-

=========================================================

Thursday September 26, 2019 17:26 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Section of Snake River to close to steelhead fishing


Action: Closes steelhead fishing and retention downstream of Couse Creek Boat Ramp.

Effective date: Sept. 29 through Dec. 31, 2019.

Species affected: Steelhead. 

Locations and daily limits:

From the mouth of the Snake River (Burbank to Pasco Railroad Bridge at Snake River mile 1.25) to the Couse Creek Boat Ramp:

Closed to fishing for and retention of Steelhead.
From Couse Creek boat ramp upstream to the Idaho/Oregon state line:

Daily limit 1 hatchery steelhead. Anglers may not continue to fish for salmon or steelhead after either the steelhead or adult salmon daily limit has been retained.
Reason for action: Washington fishery managers previously reduced hatchery steelhead limits to one fish per day and added length restrictions downstream of the Couse Creek Boat Ramp. Based on the new B-index steelhead forecast, managers are closing the steelhead fishery in this area to ensure that sufficient numbers of both wild and hatchery B-index fish return to their natal tributaries and hatcheries of origin in Idaho.

Additional information:  Upstream of the Couse Creek Boat Ramp, where steelhead fishing remains open, all steelhead with unclipped adipose fins must be immediately released unharmed.

Barbless hooks are required when fishing for steelhead in the Snake River.

Anglers may not remove any salmon or steelhead from the water if it is not or cannot be retained as part of the daily limit.

WDFW will continue to monitor the steelhead return.  If additional conservation measures need to be taken, or additional opportunity can be offered without negatively impacting wild or hatchery steelhead abundances, seasons and harvest rules may be adjusted in coming months.  Please continue to check emergency rules if you are planning to fish for steelhead within the affected area.

-WDFW-

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Pyrites
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PostTue Oct 01, 2019 7:52 pm 
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Beavers employed for steelhead et al.

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Ski
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PostWed Oct 02, 2019 4:18 pm 
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Wednesday, October 2, 2019 14:57 PDT

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

WDFW seeks SEPA public comment on Cooke Aquaculture farming of rainbow trout/steelhead


OLYMPIA – Yesterday, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) began a 21-day public comment period regarding Cooke Aquaculture’s proposal to farm sterile (triploid) rainbow trout/steelhead in Puget Sound.

The Department posted a State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) mitigated determination of non-significance that analyzes the environmental impacts of Cooke’s proposal to transition from farming Atlantic salmon to farming steelhead in several of the company’s existing facilities. These facilities include four net pens located near Rich Passage and Skagit Bay, but in the future may cover three more Puget Sound net pens currently owned by Cooke.

“Given the escape of Atlantic salmon in 2017, we know that there is a heightened sense of concern around the impacts of fish aquaculture in Puget Sound,” said WDFW Fish Program Director Kelly Cunningham. “We want to hear from the public about Cooke Aquaculture’s proposal and our proposed permit requirements.”

In addition to agreeing to farm only sterile fish, Cooke will also need to prescreen any fish destined for net pens in Washington waters to ensure that they are free of disease.

Cooke submitted a five-year Marine Aquaculture Permit application to WDFW in January 2019, and a SEPA Environmental Checklist with supporting documents in July 2019.

WDFW continues to work with its natural resource agency partners to provide oversight and ensure compliance with the terms of aquaculture permits and leases in Puget Sound. Cooke’s proposal would also be subject to additional regulatory review by WDFW’s sister state agencies before the proposed transition could take place.

The public is asked to submit comments by Oct. 22, 2019. The determination, including ways to comment, and supporting documents can be found at: https://wdfw.wa.gov/licenses/environmental/sepa/open-comments.

-WDFW-

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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moonspots
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Happy Curmudgeon
PostThu Oct 03, 2019 9:16 am 
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BigBrunyon wrote:
Yeah thats a eater

They're better pickled (to neutralize all the bones that can't be filleted out). 👍😊

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