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uww
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PostMon Sep 09, 2019 9:09 pm 
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Well the first post contained the answer to the question so really we are all just killing the Earth with our wasteful posting.

As this thread is now part of the permanent searchable record, hopefully somebody who is not the OP will read the discussion and become enlightened to current campfire best practices and the idea that ripping down living trees in the wilderness to make a huge out of control fire is not actually a good idea. I assume you are not supposed to drunkenly make an 8 foot fire using gasoline on USFS property, but not sure if that is specifically prohibited anywhere- and believe it or not someone smart enough to read the internet has done so and is probably planning to do so again.

"Damaging the National Forest System" is subject to interpretation, but doing it by fire is specifically prohibited by federal regulation. Land Managers have the authority to regulate wilderness fires as they see fit.

Here's 36 CFR 261.5

Title 36 - Parks, Forests, and Public Property
Chapter II - FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Part 261 - PROHIBITIONS
Subpart A - General Prohibitions
Section 261.5 - Fire.

The following are prohibited:

(a) Carelessly or negligently throwing or placing any ignited substance or other substance that may cause a fire.

(b) Firing any tracer bullet or incendiary ammunition.

(c) Causing timber, trees, slash, brush or grass to burn except as authorized by permit.

(d) Leaving a fire without completely extinguishing it.

(e) Causing and failing to maintain control of a fire that is not a prescribed fire that damages the National Forest System.

(f) Building, attending, maintaining, or using a campfire without removing all flammable material from around the campfire adequate to prevent its escape.

(g) Negligently failing to maintain control of a prescribed fire on Non-National Forest System lands that damages the National Forest System.

[42 FR 2957, Jan. 14, 1977, as amended at 46 FR 33520, June 30, 1981; 73 FR 30307, May 27, 2008]
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Bedivere
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Why Do Witches Burn?
PostMon Sep 09, 2019 10:24 pm 
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pjhorst wrote:
It seems like when campfires come up, people weigh in very heavily and lean towards "it's illegal to take x wood"  or "over y feet on the west side of the cascades", etc...

I put my little analyst hat on and try to research to verify and ultimately, comply.



The same happens with every post about dogs.  There are people who figure that since leashes are required on their favorite trails that means that leashes are required EVERYWHERE, or that since dogs are prohibited in certain areas that means they're prohibited everywhere.  They don't seem to realize that each Wilderness area has it's own rules and regs, that National Parks /= National Forests /= WA DNR land, etc. so they spout off incorrect information in such threads.

Such is life on the internet, I guess.   wink.gif

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RandyHiker
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PostMon Sep 09, 2019 10:29 pm 
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uww wrote:
(d) Leaving a fire without completely extinguishing it

That's the one that seems to cause the most trouble.  Or at least, I've doused numbers of smoldering abandoned campfire over the years, including one that had migrated out of an improperly constructed fire ring through duff underneath many feet beyond the original ring.

People seem to be unwilling to haul enough water to adequately douse a fire and stir water into the coals until they are 100% out.
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Pahoehoe
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PostTue Sep 10, 2019 12:23 am 
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This weekend, I had the pleasure of dealing with 3 large piles of dog sh## left 20 feet from water and well within the high water line on river rock near the source of a major watershed/river system.

Piles were left by the off leash dog of a family with 2 children that thought nothing of screaming and squealing loud enough to be heard well over the rushing river all afternoon and well into the night.

How do you deal with your dogs poo if they are off leash and you dont know where they poo?  I'm seriously asking.

The other group camped nearby left their fire burning.  Like flaming, burning.  Granted, it was very wet, but still.

This is kind of why I dont backpack as much as I use to.  I try my best to make it so those camped near me don't know I'm there.

The family had to walk right past their dogs poo to hike out.  I don't really know how they didnt see it.

I hike with a dog but hes pretty well velcroed to my heels.

We are all to polite to confront people.
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JVesquire
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PostTue Sep 10, 2019 10:32 am 
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In addition to the other useful ideas, LNT principles usually suggests only taking down, dead wood that is no wider in circumference than your wrist. That increases the chances you completely burn the wood down to ash, rather than leaving a smoldering log.
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Sky Hiker
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PostTue Sep 10, 2019 11:40 am 
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But some will just let the larger ones burn and walk away
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BigBrunyon
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PostTue Sep 10, 2019 10:02 pm 
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'Bout sunset you can always see the smoke from the ragers filling up the spider meadow vicinities. Usually centered around them trees at the start of the meadow. Smoke plumes risin' up as various groups light up for the night's boozin' festivities around the fire

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MtnGoat
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PostWed Sep 11, 2019 8:16 am 
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Everyone has their own version of the holy outdoor rites. Let the good times roll.

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Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
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Forum Index > Trail Talk > Glacier Peak Wilderness - campfire regulations?
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