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Pahoehoe
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PostThu Jan 02, 2020 11:22 pm 
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Bronco wrote:
Sadly outdoor activity groups get sued for not having first aid gear and/or training as recommended by best practices.  A flushing syringe is recommended in the Wilderness First Responder curriculum.  Not a bad idea to flush any wound before bandaging. 

I submit that an organized group leader has a little more responsibility than an individual day hiker.

I'm talking about outings lasting just a couple hours.  Like, if someone is hurt, we are turning around.  I get why you would want the ability to clean and dress serious wounds on a longer trip, but it doesnt make much sense when you aren't far from doctor/hospital/urgent care if needed, and clean running water...

Plus, probably over 50% of people use hydration bladders which can do the same thing as a syringe.  So can some water bottles.  You could also cut the corner off a ziplock bag and make a good stream of water...

Everything, not matter how small and light is taking space and energy that could be used for something else...
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Downhill
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PostFri Jan 03, 2020 7:22 pm 
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Plenty of ironies here to kick around.

>99% of the people reading this thread know not only what to bring, but how to avoid getting in trouble in the first place (of course accidents still do happen to experienced, knowledgable outdoors people).

The vast majority of problems occur, not just to the unprepared, but those lacking the knowledge and experience to understand the risks or even realize they are putting themselves at risk at all.

I guess I'm just getting too cynical in my old age but there's an overabundance of safety information available today, much more so than past decades but there's never a shortage of people heading in the mountains who are dangerously ill-prepared.

Maybe it's the availability of "information" that is contributing to the problem.  People see beautiful photos of "________ Lake" on Instaspam and expect hiking there is as easy as clicking on the photo.  I don't like adding myself to the "blame-social-media" squad but I do think there is at least some valid attribution.
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Pahoehoe
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PostFri Jan 03, 2020 7:24 pm 
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Sometimes, but I dont think you can fault someone for taking a bad step and twisting an ankle or something.
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WaState
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PostMon Jan 13, 2020 11:56 am 
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If a person tends to twist ankles there some things to do to help prevent or mitigate. First thing is to take short steps especially down hill. Most times twisted ankles happen when stepping downhill. Little short steps greatly reduce the chance of a twisted ankle and knee injury. Also trekking poles help support ankles , knees , back etc. Stepping down with a slightly bent knee also can help. Stepping down with the toe of the boot slightly pointed outward  can also help.  Dont every go into mental zombie mode, which often happens after a long day heading down after a hike. Mentally force the shorter steps, toes outward, bent knee, using trekking poles.  On flat ground or uphill can safely stretch out step length.

Even with weak knees or ankles with care one can prevent injury. Doing such tricks does not slow you down  much.

If needed get more sturdy footwear, wide low footwear may be best with ankle support.

Lastly carry duck tape and or a ace bandage, both can be used to wrap up the ankle to keep moving.

If you twist the ankle once , slow down , concentrate on short steps,  toes pointed out some, maybe wrap the ankle. This to prevent the next ankle twist that may stop you.

If the above is done by everyone with weak ankles, SAR call outs likely to be reduced quite a bit.

Those who read this can pass the information on.

I am just guy who has had twisted ankles so by neciessty figured out what to do about it. With shorter steps downhill and not going into mental zombie mode. I very rarely twist the ankle these days and if so it is not that bad of twist.
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Pahoehoe
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PostMon Jan 13, 2020 12:13 pm 
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Wow.  Just wow.
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WaState
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PostMon Jan 13, 2020 12:18 pm 
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I l sometimes like singing , walk like a duck steps short and toes wide , quack , quack , quack.  wink.gif

This also works uphill in snow.
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