Forum Index > Trail Talk > Ecology in the Pasayten
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
FiresideChats
Member
Member


Joined: 20 Jan 2014
Posts: 298 | TRs
Location: San Juan Islands
FiresideChats
  Top

Member
PostFri May 22, 2020 9:27 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ecology in the Pasayten

I'm plotting some loopy excursions in the central and eastern Pasayten and I know massive amounts of forests burned in the Diamond Creek fire I'm 2017. I've been up Robinson Creek once, to Ferguson Lake, but further east has been on my list for a long while.

I'd like to know more about the basic Ecology of the Pasayten and what it will be like in the near middle and distant term. Then I'd like to keep this in mind as I hike this area over the rest of my lifetime. I know we'll be passing through large snag fields this year.

Anyone have books or articles to recommend? Or thoughts and observations on the subject?

Most of the burned tree snags I see in trip reports are pretty small. Is is there a natural fire regime as there is in the boreal forests to the north? If so, what is the average interval? Does it vary by latitude and predominate tree species?

Will we have much larger open areas for a long time or will the forest grow back quickly? Why it why not?

I have found a few things online:

I enjoyed this overview of the shift from intensive grazing back to wilderness in the 90s.

https://botanicgardens.uw.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/7/2019/03/Ohlson-Recreation-Pasayten-Wilderness-2019WBS.pdf

I'm reading this text too, a forester's perspective from 50 years ago.

https://talltimbers-org.exactdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/33-Fahnestock1974_op.pdf
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
treeswarper
Alleged Sockpuppet!



Joined: 25 Dec 2006
Posts: 9627 | TRs
Location: Don't move here
treeswarper
  Top

Alleged Sockpuppet!
PostSat May 23, 2020 7:37 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
FiresideChats wrote:
Most of the burned tree snags I see in trip reports are pretty small. Is is there a natural fire regime as there is in the boreal forests to the north? If so, what is the average interval? Does it vary by latitude and predominate tree species?

You might want to read up on the tree that gets no respect--Lodgepole Pine or Pinus contorta.
It is short lived and depends on fire, although I've seen cones open in hot sun, for reproduction.  It grows for about 80 years, gets to about 8 inches in diameter, then becomes attractive to bark beetles and tends to burn up.  The cones then open up from the heat and the area is reforested and the cycle starts again.

--------------
What's especially fun about sock puppets is that you can make each one unique and individual, so that they each have special characters. And they don't have to be human––animals and aliens are great possibilities
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brushbuffalo
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Sep 2015
Posts: 1462 | TRs
Location: there earlier, here now, somewhere later... Bellingham in between
Brushbuffalo
  Top

Member
PostSun May 24, 2020 7:48 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Something else to keep in mind in lodgepole pine forests is that after a fire eventually the trails will ( hopefully) be cleared of fallen logs. However, the standing dead trees will continue to fall for several more years, so a trail once-cleared will usually be in need of maintenance for a while longer.

--------------
Passing rocks and trees like they were standing still
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
FiresideChats
Member
Member


Joined: 20 Jan 2014
Posts: 298 | TRs
Location: San Juan Islands
FiresideChats
  Top

Member
PostSun May 24, 2020 12:07 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Right. And many of the trees can be cleared by a modest saw i would think.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Sallie4jo
Member
Member


Joined: 24 Jun 2009
Posts: 101 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Sallie4jo
  Top

Member
PostSun May 24, 2020 7:47 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
And..do believe when a map says not maintained..at least in the 90s..the lodgepole pines are the 1st trees to grow after a fire..and most of the trips i took out there..had several if not longer miserable weather conditions in August..including snow.  I love it out there.

--------------
I choose to live in a landscape of hope.
                           Terry Tempest Williams
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Trail Talk > Ecology in the Pasayten
  Happy Birthday iluka, ADAHY!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy