Forum Index > Full Moon Saloon > Less than 1% of all forests in British Columbia are large, lower elevation old growth
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Anne Elk
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PostMon Jun 22, 2020 1:11 pm 
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cascadetraverser wrote:
After paddling and exploring some amazing Big trees on Vancouver Island as juxtaposed to the car ride up to those paddling sites (there just isn`t alot or really any forests left alone up there; Maybe Strathcona PP?) and hiking along the Border swath for a long spell decades ago and looking at the north side of the swath as compared to the south, I tend to agree that the BC government could care less about its Old giants or pristine ecosystems.  Its really unfortunate....

To get back to the point of altasnob's OP, and what I think was the point of the article in the link, when most of the public talks about "old growth", what they really are referring to are the giant trees of the coast ranges.

The first time I drove the east coast Vancouver Island by car I couldn't believe how much "nothing" there was in terms of old growth, or even 2nd growth forest.  Back in the 70's when I made my first-ever trip to the coast, we went to Ucluelet and Pacific Rim NP - they were logging right up to the N/S road that was the park boundary.

Someday I want to see some of the giants that are left in some of the VI west coast water sheds.  BC has always been a province heavily reliant on extraction industries (well, maybe most of Canada), and preservationists up there have always had a harder time than their US counterparts, as there is no EPA, NFS or equivalent up there.  They let the companies who have Crown Land Grants police themselves.  And yet, they've had a few victories - the Carmanagh Valley, Great Bear Rainforest and Haida Gwaii.  The Haida managed to stop them before they completely scalped the islands.

The best visual evocation of the coastal old growth and the clearcutting of same that I've ever seen is Hadwin's Judgement.  Without a lot of "preaching to the choir" the film just shows the reality of the loss of ancient forest.  You can see the trailer and buy a stream from links on the site. The book (The Golden Spruce) was in some ways even more evocative than the film, conveying the ecosystem and culture of the forests, natives, and loggers of the day.  Highly recommend.

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"There are yahoos out there.  Itís why we canít have nice things."  - Tom Mahood
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JonnyQuest
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PostMon Jun 22, 2020 6:26 pm 
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AE, thanks for enlightening me on Grant Hadwin film.  I certainly enjoyed and recommend the book The Golden Spruce.  I'd also give a shout out to the book The Tiger, another book by Vaillant.  Fascinating read, especially since I was a fan of the 1975 film Dersu Uzala.
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Anne Elk
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PostMon Jun 22, 2020 6:57 pm 
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^^^  up.gif Agreed, JQ.  I read "The Tiger" also, after hearing Vaillant speak at Third Place Books in Lake Forest Park.  The director of Hadwin's Judgement did a film on that too, titled "Conflict Tiger", which I haven't seen.  I'd like to watch Dersu Uzala again - I saw it during its theater run.

Vaillant quotes from Hadwin's missive, "The Judgement", but he didn't include the whole text in the book - and I guess the family has never released it. I like to fantasize that Hadwin indeed faked his death and is still out there somewhere.

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"There are yahoos out there.  Itís why we canít have nice things."  - Tom Mahood
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Pyrites
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PostMon Jun 22, 2020 7:10 pm 
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Using 1% of all B.C. forests as a measurement of lowland old growth forests is not a helpful measurement. British Columbia has huge areas of interior forests that are quite different than the coastal forests. To start with large areas interior forests have enough precipitation to be forested, just. Thereís large variation in forest type with latitude. Natural tree cover at Blaine WA is different than that at San Francisco CA.

B.C. extends about that distance N & S.

If youíre talking lowland coastal forests, use that as baseline. To include forests around Merritt or Alexis Creek or Smithers is just not meaningful.

Best.
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