Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Camping at Lake 22, then dinner at Big Four
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Kim Brown
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PostFri Feb 14, 2020 1:48 pm 
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RandyHiker wrote:
Anne Elk wrote:
From the permit:

Quote:
...bury or burn all refuse and leave my camping place in a clean and sanitary condition.

Well there's a nonsequitur.  I guess "pack it out" never occurred to them.

"Bash, Burn and Bury" was the guideline until "Backpacking One Step at Time" was published in 1972 and the idea of "If you can carry it in full, you can pack it out empty" started to gain traction.

It is kinda cool to trace the history and evolution of back country use, isn't it?  I enjoy old Mountaineer (albums? I can't recall what their booklets were called - they've been published online now)

Some of the old Signpost magazine letters to the editor were about how hikers should start carrying it out, and Signposters and Louise began that education amonst readers (which, anyone who was anyone, was a Signpost subscriber); backpacking/hiking boom of the last 1960's  overwhelmed the old rule. I think it was quite forward-thinking of them, and of Louise Marshall (Signpost editor and creator of Signpost) to begin that kind of education then.

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" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
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Anne Elk
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PostFri Feb 14, 2020 2:27 pm 
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Kim Brown wrote:
Some of the old Signpost magazine letters to the editor were about how hikers should start carrying it out, and Signposters and Louise began that education amonst readers (which, anyone who was anyone, was a Signpost subscriber); backpacking/hiking boom of the last 1960's  overwhelmed the old rule. I think it was quite forward-thinking of them, and of Louise Marshall (Signpost editor and creator of Signpost) to begin that kind of education then.

Indeed. Back in the day, it seems there was also more of a "funnel effect", amongst the growing crowd of the hiker/backpacker set; ie, if you got interested and began trying to learn how to do it, (equipment, places to go, technique etc) you had to do your own research and talk to the folks working at your local outfitters, and so picked up good habits early.  These days, not so much it seems, thanks to ... Instagram et al.  But I'll admit to likely having a distorted view of how much more "woke" backcountry travellers were when I was learning. We actually picked up books by Paul Petzoldt et al and learned something, instead of just traipsing up Pilchuck in flip-flops.  hockeygrin.gif

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"There are yahoos out there.  It’s why we can’t have nice things."  - Tom Mahood
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reststep
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PostFri Feb 14, 2020 2:37 pm 
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Here's a link to the Mountaineer Annuals online.

https://www.mountaineers.org/about/history/the-mountaineer-annuals

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"The mountains are calling and I must go." - John Muir
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FiresideChats
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PostSun May 24, 2020 6:24 pm 
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reststep wrote:
Here's a link to the Mountaineer Annuals online.

https://www.mountaineers.org/about/history/the-mountaineer-annuals

I'm really enjoying the old Mountaineers reports. Thanks for the link.
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Dusty Trale
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PostTue May 26, 2020 11:23 am 
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Here is some info about the two cabins at Lake 22. From the book, "Monte Cristo Area, A Complete Outdoor Guide", by Harry J. Majors and Richard C. McCollum published in 1977.

"Lake Twenty-Two...Twenty-two Creek received its name within 1892-95, as this was the site of bridge number 22 on the Everett and Monte Cristo Railroad. The lake was discovered by 1897 and originally named "Canyon Lake", bu by 1918 it had assumed its present name from the creek. With in 1927-1931 an Everett YMCA camp with two buildings was established at the outlet of the lake, and a trail was built along the east side of the creek to reach this; but, by 1939 the camp was discontinued. The present trail along the west side of the creek was built between 1956-1969. The Lake Twenty-two Research Natural Area (790 acres) was set aside by the Forest Service on January 14, 1947, to protect a remarkably fine stand of virgin cedar and hemlock."

The YMCA camp at Lake 22 ended when the Hartford & Eastern RR stopped running, being the kids to the trailhead to hike up to the camp. The camp was gone before the Mtn. Loop Highway was built.
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FiresideChats
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PostTue May 26, 2020 5:08 pm 
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Great detail, Dusty, thanks. One thinks of Spring and Manning and the canvas and burlap and cast iron of that era.

The First 100 Years is a title about the history of the Snohomish County YMCA. It's in a few local libraries. Has anyone read it? Might reference the Lake Twenty-two excursions.
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Riverside Laker
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PostWed May 27, 2020 12:45 pm 
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On the naming of Twentytwo Creek (and Lake Twenty-two):

I think Majors and McCollum got it wrong (have seen have other errors in their books). Click on this map that Fred Cruger of the Granite Falls History Museum put together. Warning: this map is addictive and may cost you some time.

LOSCHO map of Snohomish County

Zoom way in to where Twentytwo Creek empties into the Stillaguamish. Turn on the NPRR layer (Northern Pacific Railroad) and you'll see... hmmm... bridge 24 right there.

Note also that Twentytwo Creek lies mostly in section 22.

The 1952 map on the link above labels the camp at the lake. So does the 1940, but not the earlier. The 1927 map lables it "Canyon Lake".

By the way, there was a place called "Bogardus" at Bridge #23. The E&MC RR used to stop there.

I have a signed copy of Larry O'Donnell's book The First 100 Years, an Illustrated History of The YMCA of Snohomish County. Page 49 refers to the 1922 camp at Lake Roesiger, 1923 at Lake Goodwin, 1924 at Lake Chaplain. Coincidentally I just rode my bike past some of those lakes yesterday. Lake Chaplain was only used until 1930 when it became a settling basin and storage reservoir for Everett's water supply.

And on page 53 he states in Nov 1930 the US Forest Service granted permission for development of a camp at Lake 22 on the north side of Mt Pilchuck. A trail was blazed to the lake in 1931 and named the Lew Day Trail in honor of the man who donated funds to develop the trail.

The trail was dedicated by none other than J.C. Penney, among other dignitaries.

Larry O is pretty rigorous with his research, and had access to Y records.

Majors and McCollum say the Lake Twenty-Two camp was discontinued in 1939.

The 1967 printing of Trips and Trails, p. 55, by E.M. Sterling says there is a primitive but heavily used camp at the lake. It also says there was an almost permanent snowfield at the far end.

The Everett Y just left their 100 year old building last fall, going to a fancy new building. The old YMCA building is slated to become apartments. Now I'm getting into too much detail for a hiking site... but for those completely fascinated, more about the old YMCA is here.
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FiresideChats
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PostThu May 28, 2020 7:39 pm 
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Those maps are great fun. Thanks for the warning! I held off until after I had assignments graded. I agree with your assessment, but also consider: When you zoom out of the 1927 maps, Lake 22 reverts Canyon Lake, as you note, but adjacent Thatcher Lake becomes "22 Lake." The plot thickens...

But wait, there's more. On the 1934 maps, 22 Lake has become "Thetcher," while "Canyon Lake" has become "Two Lake." "Thetcher" Lake becomes "Thatcher" and finally grows up to become the lovely Heather Lake of modern times. Meanwhile the Creek flowing out of Thetcher/Thatcher/Heather Lake Changes from "Triple Creek" [1927] to "Triple Creek (Thatcher Creek)" [1934, 1940, 1952] to Heather Creek [1975].
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Riverside Laker
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PostThu May 28, 2020 10:02 pm 
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Wow! I didn’t notice all that. Ah, time constraints are a pain.
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FiresideChats
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PostFri May 29, 2020 8:46 pm 
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Also of note on the north side of Pilchuck is the location of the real island lake. Earlier maps have two "Island" lakes, but in 1975 only the real Island Lake remains (by Boardman) and the fake one (by Pinnacle) disappears.
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Joseph
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PostWed Aug 26, 2020 9:02 pm 
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borank wrote:
Does anyone know of a cabin that used to be at the lake?

My Dad's story of getting to the lake, finding snow up past the cabin eaves and digging down to get in has gotten a little murkier in my memory, but I'm pretty sure he said Lk 22.  That would have been just before or just after ww2.  I'm wondering if the cabin was removed when the Natural Area was created.

My dad described a similar situation at Snow Lake - there was  cabin and they entered through the upper windows which weren't locked, and the snow level gave access. This would have been in the late 40's.  or mid.
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