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carlb328
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PostMon Nov 16, 2020 6:14 am 
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The latest 'Everest' is a mountain you've probably never heard of

https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/muchu-chhish-world-highest-unclimbed-mountain-pakistan/index.html

I'm not a climber, but I thought this would be appreciated here.
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GaliWalker
Have camera will use



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PostMon Nov 16, 2020 8:40 am 
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Quote:
"The real question at this point," adds Martin, with a laugh, "is whether anybody cares."

We do!  cool.gif

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'Gali'Walker => 'Mountain-pass' walker
bobbi: "...don't you ever forget your camera!"
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zimmertr
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PostMon Nov 16, 2020 8:37 pm 
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Has everything in the United States been climbed at this point aside from challenging alternative routes?
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puzzlr
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PostMon Nov 16, 2020 10:27 pm 
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That all depends on your criteria. There are low-prominence bumps in the Middle Fork Snoqualmie that I'd like to visit which I highly doubt have ever been visited. And if so, how would one know? So it feels like a first ascent even if it isn't.

But a FA has never meant much to me. It's an accident of when you were born and what gear and climbing methods had been invented. I read a similar thought expressed by some original members of the Mountaineers when many other club members were out getting FAs. They were more impressed by a nicer line or the discovery of a new and interesting route on a known peak than getting a FA.

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Cyclopath
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PostMon Nov 16, 2020 10:40 pm 
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Seems like there must be remote peaks in Alaska that have never seen a human visitor.
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zimmertr
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PostMon Nov 16, 2020 10:47 pm 
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puzzlr wrote:
There are low-prominence bumps in the Middle Fork Snoqualmie



You know I thought about this myself when I made an attempt for Preacher Mountain and aborted to a small bump to the left of Rainy Lake. It was very unimpressive and I couldn't help but wonder if anyone had ever stood there before.
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OwenT
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PostMon Nov 16, 2020 11:50 pm 
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You'd think less assuming highpoints may never have seen a visitor but you have to remember to not think like a climber. Especially in an area like the Middle Fork Snoqualmie. Miners, loggers, hunters, (both natives and modern), RR scouts. Miners are probably the biggest one in a lot of areas because they comb the hills looking for any trace of minerals and you never know where a vein will crop out until you're standing on top of it or find a trace downhill of it. In areas with lots of vegetation and sediment-filled valleys, ridges and hills as well as steep gulches are good because the rock is more often exposed for easy inspection.
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texasbb
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PostTue Nov 17, 2020 7:52 am 
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Agree w.r.t. miners.  And they probably made it up with several mules and some digging equipment, maybe spent a winter or two there.
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gb
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PostTue Nov 17, 2020 8:07 am 
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I suppose Native Americans don't count. Probably twenty years ago Carl D. took me to a rock climbing area somewhere W or WSW of Moab. There were two cracks, we did one. At the base of one of the cracks, a fist crack of about 5.9 or 5.10 there was a pictograph - of a man with a large fist.....
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Brushbuffalo
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PostTue Nov 17, 2020 10:11 am 
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puzzlr wrote:
feels like a first ascent

First ascents can be strange.
Beckey gives us credit for ' first ascents' of mostly obscure bumps on ridges that we climbed over while doing geology. Examples include Pocket Peak, Lonesome Peak, and the Big Bosom Buttes ('Skagit Range'). We skipped others due to time constraints. Although we used a helicopter for ingress and egress, we never landed near any of those summits, instead being dropped off 'here', doing the day's traverse, and being picked up ' there.' If a summit was handy on the way, cool. This was one year prior to NCNP being established so we weren't violating any policies.
Fred knew we were 'helicopter athletes' but still lists those as F.A.

I don't know and don't particularly care whether those were first ascents or not.  I agree with Owen T that others, most likely miners, may have visited some of those summits long before we did.  I do know that miners had been to Sulphide Lake on the southeastern flank of Mount Shuksan earlier than 1967, when we were there, and I was struck by it being one of the more difficult-to-reach 'non-summit' sites I have been to ( we did a quick heli stop to investigate highly oxidized rock. It would be an adventure getting there on foot).

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