Forum Index > Trip Reports > Dosewallips Road to the ranger station 12-04-2018
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Ancient Ambler
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PostTue Dec 11, 2018 6:58 am 
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Thanks for the kind comments, everyone.  I really appreciate all of them.   I've enjoyed many adventures along the Dosewallips drainage and its associated trails and routes starting back in 1963 and I feel very fortunate to be able still to get out and enjoy this special region of the Olympics now, so many years later.  Memories of how it was before the washout are part of the experience of hiking the area now for me, so I probably triggered the "repair road/don't repair road" discussion that has developed in this thread by mentioning how long ago the washout occurred.  It wasn't my intention to start a to and fro discussion on that topic here, so I won't perpetuate it by giving my two-cents here.  I think RodF has raised some points worth considering in the stewardship forum and I would personally enjoy seeing a more robust discussion on the topic there.  Please do not take this as criticism, Rod.

  Hesman:  I enjoyed your TR and excellent photos on the Dose road/trail last spring.

  Dick B:  My guess is that about 400 to 500 feet of roadway were washed out back in early 2002 and since.  The exact lineal distance of washout may be mentioned in one of the many links to government documents that are contained in past stewardship threads on this topic.

Tomlike:   I was sorry not to make it up the Dose for fall color this year.   I hope you got some vibrant scenes up there.

Anne Elk:   You asked why it is now 6.5 miles to the ranger station.   As best I can remember, a year or so ago, probably during a very high rain event, a huge amount of rocky debris came down a gully crossing the Dose Road about 1 mile east of the prior washout and blocked the Dose Road.  ONF had previously had to clear similar debris flows at the same place repeatedly, leaving the area a tough spot to cross for low clearance vehicles.  ONF seem to have thrown in the towel and have now blocked the Dose Road at that point.  As far as I know, there are no plans to clear the blockage.    You ask if your snowy peak photo shows Mount Jupiter.  I am not sure if the actual summit is shown in your photo, but those crags are certainly near the summit of Jupiter.
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RodF
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PostTue Dec 11, 2018 8:15 pm 
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Anne Elk wrote:
...if there are no other such limited access areas in ONP.

But there are many.  In this valley alone, a mile above the washout, turn left and cross the "Ten Mile" concrete road bridge, then hike upriver above the south bank to intercept the Old Dosewallips Trail and the Muscott Basin Trails (trails 81 and 82 in Robert L Wood's "Olympic Mountains Trail Guide").  The Tunnel Creek trailhead, 2 miles before the washout, climbs to 5050 Pass.  And, of course, both the main fork Dosewallips and east fork Dosewallips trails from Dosewallips RS.  Both Dose Meadows and Honeymoon Meadows used to be within dayhike range...

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivatedĒ - Vandana Shiva
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RumiDude
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PostTue Dec 11, 2018 10:28 pm 
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Anne Elk wrote:
I now lean toward being ok with the road not being restored for vehicles, especially if there are no other such limited access areas in ONP.

Part of the issue is that there are many culverts along the road which need to be maintained or they will eventually blow out, with all the attendant issues that brings. There are already a few issues with culverts along the road. And if there is going to be some kind of shuttle, well the road will have to be rebuilt for that.

We have lost the Elwha and Altair campgrounds in the last couple of years. Along with the loss of Elkhorn and Dose campgrounds along the Dosewallips River, this puts added pressure on the remaining campgrounds near or in ONP.  ONP suffers a lot of washouts because of the heavy rainfal it gets and because much of the road maintenance gets put off. In the past decade, the Whisky bend road has been closed about as much as it has been open. A slightly less fate for the
Hot Springs road. It could be several more years before the Elwha River Valley trail system is opened up for good access as before. And there is always the possibility that it may suffer a similar fate as the Dosewallips. I personally think more access is better.

Rumi

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"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."
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Gregory
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PostWed Dec 12, 2018 6:13 am 
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Drive up to the Hamma Hamma, park and get out of your rig without stepping in somebodies crap. It is fairly clean now because of the fire closure but The normal these days is just gross. Same for the Skokomish drainage, The washout on the Dose has kept the people that treat our lands this way at bay.I have family in Brinnon and yes they have had to adjust to the loss of people spending money coming and going up there. That said I selfishly, hope that the road never gets repaired. Thanks to the threatened warty jumping slug it probably never will.

http://archive.kitsapsun.com/outdoors/seabury-blair-jr-jumping-slug-document-raises-sensitive-questions-ep-421916064-358563551.html?page=1
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coldrain108
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PostWed Dec 12, 2018 10:19 am 
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RodF wrote:
Both Dose Meadows and Honeymoon Meadows used to be within dayhike range...

Dose meadows was 13 miles one way before the washout - that is some mighty strong day hiking there.  Del Monte Ridge might have been a cool day hike destination - 14+ miles round trip.  Anderson Pass was 9 miles one way = swarmed and trashed.  Now its a nice wilderness 15 miles in, about the same as from the other side.

To me, and many folks I meet on the trail, the remoteness of ONP is the attraction.

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"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch and do nothing"  - Albert Einstein
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Hesman
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PostWed Dec 12, 2018 12:40 pm 
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coldrain108 wrote:
Dose meadows was 13 miles one way before the washout - that is some mighty strong day hiking there.  Del Monte Ridge might have been a cool day hike destination - 14+ miles round trip.  Anderson Pass was 9 miles one way = swarmed and trashed.  Now its a nice wilderness 15 miles in, about the same as from the other side.

To me, and many folks I meet on the trail, the remoteness of ONP is the attraction.

I remember the trail to Anderson Pass being quite popular before the road washed out. Not as much now.

If the road is never reopened, then Iíll fondly remember it when it was open.

I remember when it was open that where it washed out was a built up part of the road with logs and rocks. So, I can see why it washed out easier than other parts of the road near the river.

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You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time. - Abraham Lincoln
Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened. - Dr. Seuss
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Fullripbrian
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PostWed Dec 12, 2018 1:46 pm 
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I've dayhiked Anderson Pass twice in the past few years.  Also dayhiked EV when Graves Creek was washed out a few years back.  I hiked from Madison Falls to North Fork Quinault via the Elwha in 2016.  It took me 20 hours, so I guess it counts as a dayhike.

I'm not that fast, I'm not that fit,and I have many bad habits.

I guess my point is that access is relative, and that all of these locations remain accessible.  Not to everybody and and not as easily as they once were.  But the access remains.

If you can work out the logistics and you have the stoke, 90% of trail destinations in ONP are reachable in a long day out moving at 2-2.5 mph.
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RumiDude
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PostWed Dec 12, 2018 2:35 pm 
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Fullripbrian wrote:
I've dayhiked Anderson Pass twice in the past few years.† Also dayhiked EV when Graves Creek was washed out a few years back.† I hiked from Madison Falls to North Fork Quinault via the Elwha in 2016.† It took me 20 hours, so I guess it counts as a dayhike.†
I'm not that fast, I'm not that fit,and I have many bad habits.

Hmmmm ...  I have done a fair amount of long distance hiking. I can can say, without fear of contradiction, hiking 52 miles from Madison Falls to North Fork Quinault TH via the Elwha is NOT a typical dayhike, even for someone that is in excellent physical condition and accustomed to hiking 30 mile days, day after day. If in fact you did that, then you were either dragging the last half of that "dayhike" or you are completely mistaken as to your physical fitness.

Fullripbrian wrote:
I guess my point is that access is relative, and that all of these locations remain accessible.† Not to everybody and and not as easily as they once were.† But the access remains.

The point is that there should be access for all sort of abilities. ONP should not be available for only the fittest of us, but to a wide variety of age and fitness levels.

Rumi

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"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."
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coldrain108
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PostWed Dec 12, 2018 3:31 pm 
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RumiDude wrote:
The point is that there should be access for all sort of abilities. ONP should not be available for only the fittest of us, but to a wide variety of age and fitness levels.

so pave all the trails and grade them to ADA standards?

There already is access for all abilities.

Just not everywhere.

If only available for the fittest of us then I would be excluded...

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"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch and do nothing"  - Albert Einstein
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RumiDude
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PostWed Dec 12, 2018 4:40 pm 
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coldrain108 wrote:
RumiDude wrote:
The point is that there should be access for all sort of abilities. ONP should not be available for only the fittest of us, but to a wide variety of age and fitness levels.

so pave all the trails and grade them to ADA standards?

There already is access for all abilities.

Just not everywhere.

If only available for the fittest of us then I would be excluded...

In the interest of observing the spirit of the No Spray rule I started a thread to continue this discussion over in the Stewardship Forum.

Rumi

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"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."
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cascadetraverser
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PostMon Dec 17, 2018 8:05 am 
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Inspired by this report, Thanks AA; my son and I hiked up with the break in weather Saturday and camped overnight at the old Dosewallips camp.  Drizzle on the way in, and some sun breaks followed by steady rain in the evening and hike out.  Managed a fire after a whole bunch of work.
Really nice to get out despite the weather.  As AA points out the trail now starts 1.5 miles before the major washout.  I am not sure if this will be the permanent start of the "trail" now as it has been fixed before but seems to always wash out again. Otherwise, the trail and camp seemed about as it always does.  Surprisingly, ran into a group of Boy Scouts (or Scouts, I guess now) from Silverdale,removing all the debris ontop of one of the bridges (the big creek prior to Constance Creek), so there are people out there still maintaining this road! smile.gif
The Dose was definately a raging sight to see.
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Anne Elk
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PostMon Dec 17, 2018 3:28 pm 
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I've never considered a winter trip over there but now you and Ancient Ambler have me contemplating it, if the weather conditions are right. Hiking in spring rain is one thing, the only winter pelting I can take is snow.  winksmile.gif

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"There are yahoos out there.  Itís why we canít have nice things."  - Tom Mahood
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kitya
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PostMon Dec 21, 2020 8:37 pm 
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Anne Elk wrote:
What kind of birdie laid that?
What kind of birdie laid that?

Oh, I found this old thread!

The egg is very unmistakable, it is american robin's egg.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_robin
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Forum Index > Trip Reports > Dosewallips Road to the ranger station 12-04-2018
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