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RumiDude
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RumiDude
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PostMon Jun 07, 2021 9:27 pm 
This summer my partner and I were supposed to fly to Scotland and just travel around for the months of July and August, doing as much hiking and "wild" camping as possible. So in preparation for that, I wanted to lower my gear weight as much as possible because I would not just be carrying all backpacking stuff, but other things to sustain us while in towns. We also were going to use public transportation instead of renting a car. So I looked around to get a lighter cooking pot (among other things) that would also nest my gas canister and stove. I settled on the Evernew Ti Pasta Pot Medium. Because of COVID-19 restrictions and all, we had to cancel our trip to Scotland and thus will spend time backpacking the Olympics and taking a road trip this summer. But we have used the Evernew Ti Pasta Pot, in conjunction with a Soto Windmaster Stove w/ Triflex on a total of about 20 days of backpacking. I thought I would offer up a review of the pot but also mention the stove as well.

Some of you will know REI used to sell this same exact pot only branded as REI and not Evernew. It has been around a long time. It is not inexpensive, but as I mentioned it is big enough for two people to do freezer-bag meals as well as nest both a canister and the stove.  I think we paid $76 for it and for the life of me can't remember what online store we got it from. The pot has a 1L capacity (that's up to the rim) and only weighs 116 grams or 4.09 ounces. Yes, it is really thin Ti on this thing. The lid kinda snaps on and actually requires a bit of two-handed effort to unseat it, but when we cook, we generally just set the lid on rather than snap it on. In conjunction with the Soto Windmaster, we can boil 1L surprisingly fast; so fast we have learned to get our stuff ready beforehand and watch to turn off the stove at the moment it reaches boil. Last week my partner, who had her doubts about the smallish limit of 1L and the Ti material, begrudgenly gave the stove and pot her unabashed approval.  So I guess it's a keeper!

A note about the combination: I could have got a waaaaaaay lighter stove like the BRS 3000, but the conditions in Scotland are almost always very windy. I wanted something that could perform well in very windy conditions. The Soto Windmaster fulfils that need. Also I got the stove from Zpacks for $65. The main reason is that Zpacks sells the stove with BOTH the TriFlex and 4Flex pot stands. Elsewhere I would have had to buy the TriFlex potstand extra for like $10 because the stove is sold with the 4Flex normally. So thumbs up to Zpacks!

For solo hikers, the Evernew Ti Pasta Pot Small is only 95 grams and has a capacity of 0.75 L and will nest a 110 grams gass canister.

Anyway, feel free to ask questions. Gear choice is always a matter of balancing several needs and wants with the various options available.

Rumi

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"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."
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InFlight
coated in DEET



Joined: 20 May 2015
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Location: Seattle area
InFlight
coated in DEET
PostTue Jun 08, 2021 12:20 pm 
The larger 1000 ml Pasta pot is a better option when boiling water for two.  It appears big enough to accommodate a larger 8 ounce (227 gram) canister  (4.3" x 4.3").

For solo use I have the Evernew Combo with a 750 ml pot/450 ml Cup and one Lid (they all nestle together.)  I can store a 3.9 ounce (110 gram) canister and stove easily inside.  it's one ounce heavier than the pasta pot, but includes a cup.  I use my old Jetboil Flash when I'm with my son or wife, and need to boil a lot more water.

I hadn't looked at the Soto stove before, the removable pot support is unique.  The four flex seems to fold-up, where the triflex-seems to be fixed.  I'd be interested in a long term review of it.

From what I've seen, the much discussed BRS 3000T has much lower BTU output then most of the standards (Pocket Rocket or Giga-power).   The pot supports on the BRS 3000T are also smaller than typical.  Personally it not a trade I'd want to make, but I'm sure the supper gram counters love it.

Using tall size sleeping bags, airpad, and clothes I was never going to be in under ten pound base weight pack club!

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I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately...  ― Henry David Thoreau
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Navy salad
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Navy salad
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PostWed Jun 09, 2021 12:26 pm 
Rumi

Good decision, in my opinion, taking public transportation in Scotland (when you go), rather than driving! I rented a car there back in the 90's and although in the country it was no big deal, in the larger cities the combination of skinny roads, big trucks (aka 'lorries'), and driving on the left was "high anxiety"!

I have the same stove as you (my favorite stove ever!), but with only the 4-prong burner. I have a similar stove with the 3-prong top and it doesn't seem as stable.

Also, are you just using the pot for boiling water? It seems like the ultra-thin titanium (just over 1/100th of an inch!) might tend to burn stuff if you're not constantly stirring it.

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mike
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PostWed Jun 09, 2021 1:56 pm 
RumiDude wrote:
We also were going to use public transportation instead of renting a car.

We returned from our last trip to Scotland just a few months before the big shut down. whew! While public transit will get you to the major places it won't get you to many of the trailheads in the Highlands. What that means is that you will spend a bunch of time dealing with the logistics, walking roads with no shoulders and/or paying a taxi for the last few miles rather than doing what you came to do. Another option is staying at B&B's or lodging that will provide a pickup and dropoff service for a small fee. Both require $$$. I highly recommend getting a small car. That may be the cheapest as it opens up camping anywhere which you can do in Scotland. And you won't be wasting a bunch of time.

And you better book way ahead. The Highlands have now made the big time and prices reflect that. The main circuits are swarming with tourists.

PM me with questions rather than hijack the thread

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RumiDude
Marmota olympus



Joined: 26 Jul 2009
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RumiDude
Marmota olympus
PostWed Jun 09, 2021 6:09 pm 
Navy salad wrote:
I have a similar stove with the 3-prong top and it doesn't seem as stable.

So far with using the TriFlex pot support we have not had any issues with instability. Mainly, I think, because the pot itself has a small bottom.

Navy salad wrote:
Also, are you just using the pot for boiling water? It seems like the ultra-thin titanium (just over 1/100th of an inch!) might tend to burn stuff if you're not constantly stirring it.

Yes, just boiling water. That was our concern with the ultra-thin Ti burning things but we have been just boiling water the last two years for our backpacking meals.

Rumi

--------------
"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."
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RumiDude
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Joined: 26 Jul 2009
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RumiDude
Marmota olympus
PostWed Jun 09, 2021 6:16 pm 
mike wrote:
RumiDude wrote:
We also were going to use public transportation instead of renting a car.

We returned from our last trip to Scotland just a few months before the big shut down. whew! While public transit will get you to the major places it won't get you to many of the trailheads in the Highlands. What that means is that you will spend a bunch of time dealing with the logistics, walking roads with no shoulders and/or paying a taxi for the last few miles rather than doing what you came to do. Another option is staying at B&B's or lodging that will provide a pickup and dropoff service for a small fee. Both require $$$. I highly recommend getting a small car. That may be the cheapest as it opens up camping anywhere which you can do in Scotland. And you won't be wasting a bunch of time.

And you better book way ahead. The Highlands have now made the big time and prices reflect that. The main circuits are swarming with tourists.

PM me with questions rather than hijack the thread

We spent two weeks in Scotland in 2017 and got everywhere we needed on public Transport then. When we do go for and extended period of two months, we may on occassion rent a car. We will likely play it by ear. My partner is in education and gets July and August off, which is HIGH tourist season. Prices jump during that time. But we have lots of money saved and lots of experience in frugal travel. I will keep you in mind as a resource though. Always good to have others' experiences to add knowledge.

Thanks!

Rumi

--------------
"This is my Indian summer ... I'm far more dangerous now, because I don't care at all."
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