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Stefan
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Joined: 17 Dec 2001
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Stefan
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PostSun Dec 16, 2001 3:45 am 
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Do you think that transplanting trees is bad from the forest to your own personal yard?
Especially if you do it from Forest Service land without their approval?


Backpacker Joe replied:
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vDid it all the time with my parents whenst I was a kid. Dont have a problem with it. I wouldnt take so many from one area that it was noticeable. That wouldnt be very nice.

TB
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Damian replied:
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The FS issues permits for transplanting trees. The policy is quite reasonable. $5 a tree I believe, payable at any ranger station. I have numerous trees on my property that were transplanted from the mountians. Firs and hemlocks. Firs are easily transplanted. Hemlocks have a harder time and take a couple years to get over the shock, but result in gorgeous trees.
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Tsolo replied:
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Assuming this is a serious topic (or is this some cairn-hater just baiting me?): I actually have recent experience with this. I finished an oriental-style rock garden in my front yard with large mounds and giant granite rocks, and decided what it needed was an alpine look. (No lawn at my house.) So I drove to the end of an abandoned logging road near Stampede Pass and liberated a number of mountain hemlocks, some beargrass clumps, and some mosses. All were just sprouting up along the side of the road, and I figured that natural selection would finish off most of them anyway. Mountain hemlocks are my favorite in-the-mountains trees; I love their foliage and the way they get bent over by the snow and then evolve into contorted shapes over the years. (I learned from a nursery that the mountain hemlocks you buy there are just dug up in forest lands anyway - no doubt by permit.) Someone has told me not to fertilize or otherwise pamper them, or they'll grow too fast and lose their natural tormented look. So now I have my own in-city alpine environment even through the winter...
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allison replied:
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I think Stefan was baiting us, but now I'm curious about the beargrass and the moss? Did they do oK or perish?
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Stefan replied:
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yes, it was a serious question. Just wanted to know other's opinions.....
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Tsolo replied:
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At the risk of turning this into a gardening forum...

My inspiration was the alpine gardens around the new Willows Lodge in Redmond/Woodinville, next to Redhook. The entry gardens are pretty impressive, with old snags, giant rocks, and alpine plantings. Worth a visit. Check out the garden photos: http://www.willowslodge.com/

Beargrass does great when transplanted; just ignore it and let it be subject to normal weather, so it thinks it's in the mountains. And use lots of fine-grain beauty bark to replicate a forest-floor kind of environment. The moss I like is the little star-shaped stuff that typically grows in the gravel by the side of dirt roads. It grows slowly and closes up when dry but then springs back out almost immediately when watered. http://www.darklightimagery.net/newnature2/floor.html

One of the best aspects of hiking to me is exploring the alpine landscape, observing and photographing the perfect gardens in nature that couldn't be improved even by 100 bonsai experts. Some typical, favorite areas are in upper Rampart Ridge, Spray Park, Surprise Lake (w. end), Mt. Pilchuck. I'd be interested in anyone else's suggestions of favorite mountain "garden" spots...
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