Forum Index > Trip Reports > Bonanza via Mary Green Glacier, July 6-8, 2008
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Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot



Joined: 30 Jan 2007
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Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot
PostSat Jul 12, 2008 1:44 am 
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Here’s my trip report from the other half of the party climbing Bonanza last weekend.

Dates: July 6-8, 2008
Peak: Bonanza 9511
Party:  Matt, Dicey, Yana, Randy, DonB


Bonanza – highest non-volcanic peak in Washington

Bonanza – big blocky peak dominating the eastern edge of the north-central Cascades.

Bonanza, from bottom to top, as viewed from Holden Pass:
  • deep blue basin of Holden Lake,
  • scores of waterfall streaming down the slab cliffs above the lake,
  • crumpled blue icefalls of the Mary Green Glacier above the cliffs,
  • bulging dark shoulders of rock above the glacier,
  • and a steep gray summit towering above everything.
Bonanza, Mary Green Glacier Face, viewed from Holden Pass camp, July 2008
Bonanza, Mary Green Glacier Face, viewed from Holden Pass camp, July 2008
Bonanza & Holden Lake, viewed from Martin, 2000
Bonanza & Holden Lake, viewed from Martin, 2000
Bonanza & Martin, viewed from Flora, August 2000
Bonanza & Martin, viewed from Flora, August 2000
Bonanza, Company Glacier face, viewed from Dark Peak, June 2006
Bonanza, Company Glacier face, viewed from Dark Peak, June 2006
Bonanza, Isella Glacier face, viewed from Greenwood, August 2006
Bonanza, Isella Glacier face, viewed from Greenwood, August 2006
Bonanza, viewed from Booker, July 2006
Bonanza, viewed from Booker, July 2006

Some History

In July 1997, I got up to 8400 feet on Bonanza, but my companions decided to turn back.  There was half a foot of fresh snow on the mountain, and they thought it would make the upper rock too difficult.  At the time, I thought they were being wastefully over-cautious.  This weekend’s climbing experience on Day 2 convinced me that they were correct.

In July 2000, I camped above Holden Pass in order to climb Martin Peak.  All day and night, our nerves were unsettled by the frequent thunder of ice breaking off the lip of the Mary Green Glacier and crashing down the cliffs.  On the present trip, the glacier was entirely silent.  With some leisure time on Day 3 of this weekend’s trip, I could study the glacier and see why.

Day 1: Holden to Holden Lake to Holden Pass Camp

Getting to the Holden trailhead for Bonanza is a journey in itself.  We left Seattle at 6am, caught the 9:45 Lake Chelan ferry at Fields Point, took the bus to the former mining town of Holden, and finally started hiking at 1:30pm.

Bonanza Trip Map
Bonanza Trip Map
Hiking out of Holden (note three sets of matching boots)
Hiking out of Holden (note three sets of matching boots)
Door to  Bonanza
Door to  Bonanza

The trail to Holden Lake was in good shape.  We passed hordes of day-hikers returning to the retreat center at Holden.  From Holden, Copper Mountain looms overhead.  As we hiked up the trail, Fernow appeared around its shoulder.  At the lake, we relaxed near the outlet and enjoyed our first view of Holden Pass and Bonanza’s summit.

Break at Holden Lake
Break at Holden Lake
Marmot, waterfall cliffs, Mary Green glacier, & summit (point with broken snowfield at left)
Marmot, waterfall cliffs, Mary Green glacier, & summit (point with broken snowfield at left)

A way trail led us around the right side of the lake.  However, high water put the trail underwater at the head of the lake, so we had to fight some brush and find bits of the trail in the woods above the lake.  Eventually we broke through to talus and trail along the inlet stream above the lake.

Escaping the brush above Holden Lake
Escaping the brush above Holden Lake

As we climbed the track to Holden Pass, we had great views of the waterfalls streaming down the cliffs below the glacier.

Waterfalls
Waterfalls
More waterfalls
More waterfalls
Don & Randy approaching Holden Pass
Don & Randy approaching Holden Pass
Yana approaching Holden Pass
Yana approaching Holden Pass

The pass itself isn’t a great camp, because it’s closed in and snowy.  Higher up on the Martin side, there’s a closed contour that has panoramic views, flat ground, and rocky benches.  I told everyone it was a couple hundred feet above the pass; actually it’s about 400 feet higher, but well worth the trip.  Hazy skies washed out the sunset, but a sickle moon rested on the side of the summit tower.

Campsite
Campsite
Tea & Bonanza from camp
Tea & Bonanza from camp
Bonanza summit moon
Bonanza summit moon

Approach stats: Holden 3226, Holden Lake 5287, Holden Pass 6400, Camp 6800.
7.5 miles, 5:30 hours, 3600 gain


Day 2: Bonanza Climb

In the morning, sunrise lit upper Bonanza pink, with the waterfalls in gray shadow below.

Bonanza sunrise
Bonanza sunrise
Bonanza in morning light
Bonanza in morning light
Light descending to waterfalls
Light descending to waterfalls

Our route up Bonanza has three main parts:
  1. Traverse from Holden Pass up to the glacier.  The crux is crossing the edge of the wet waterfall slabs and getting onto the snow.
  2. Hike up the glacier and then up the snow thumb above the glacier.  Curve around icefalls on the glacier.  Finish at the huge schrund that bisects the thumb.
  3. Scramble up another 900 feet of sloping unprotected steep rock, with occasional weak patches of snow for obstacles.  Mostly 3rd class, with occasional 4th class.  This part was just damned scary, with no margin for error.
Bonanza Route
Bonanza Route
Upper part of the route
Upper part of the route

We left camp about 6:30, dropped to the pass, hiked back up snow patches on the far side, and crossed some steep snow to the bare part of the waterfall slabs.  It turns out crampons grip quite well on wet rock.  To cross one snow patch, we had to chop a step into the undermined edge of the snow and mantle up onto it, hoping it wouldn’t break off and drop us back down the slabs.

the route up from Holden Pass to the slabs
the route up from Holden Pass to the slabs
Traversing snow to the slabs
Traversing snow to the slabs
Cramponing up a waterfall slab
Cramponing up a waterfall slab
Ready to rope up for the glacier
Ready to rope up for the glacier

Hiking up the glacier went smoothly, with early season snow filling the crevasses.  The seracs in the icefalls were impressive.

Hiking up the Mary Green Glacier
Hiking up the Mary Green Glacier
Seracs
Seracs
Turning the corner to the snow thumb
Turning the corner to the snow thumb

Now came the rock.  I used to enjoy climbing on rock with lots of exposure, but this one I didn’t enjoy.  Few good holds anywhere.  Occasional very thin moves across slabs or around snow.  Randy & Don went up faster, because they were possibly climbing Martin later.  Carla, Yana, and I ascended some ways behind.

Yana & Dicey on the rock
Yana & Dicey on the rock
Dicey at one of the widest rest spots along the way
Dicey at one of the widest rest spots along the way
Nose picker
Nose picker
Don near the summit
Don near the summit

The summit was a relief.  It had plenty of space to hang out, and huge views, especially toward Glacier Peak.

Summit group
Summit group
Matt & Glacier
Matt & Glacier
Matt & Copper/Fernow/7FingerJack/Maude
Matt & Copper/Fernow/7FingerJack/Maude
Triplet boots shot
Triplet boots shot

Summit views:

Bonanza sub-summits & Glacier Peak
Bonanza sub-summits & Glacier Peak
Dark Peak, Dome, Baker, etc
Dark Peak, Dome, Baker, etc
Looking down to Mary Green Glacier, Holden Pass, & Martin
Looking down to Mary Green Glacier, Holden Pass, & Martin
Holden Lake
Holden Lake

Summit pans:
360 degree pan (labeled)
72 labels
360 degree pan (labeled)
Glacier Peak Area
Glacier Peak Area

Busch & Brooks soon departed.  About an hour and three quarters later, they re-appeared down on the glacier.

Randy & Don departing the summit.
Randy & Don departing the summit.
Randy & Don on the glacier
Randy & Don on the glacier

The rest of us were still napping on the summit.  After about two and a half hours on the summit, we departed.

Matt & Dicey napping
Matt & Dicey napping
Changed clothes to nap some more
Changed clothes to nap some more
Dicey & Yana napping
Dicey & Yana napping

Going down was worse than going up.  We tried a few rappels, so that we’d have a rope to hang onto, but most of the anchors didn’t line up with where we wanted to go, and I ended up climbing back up the rappel rope.  (Later, from below, it looked like there were a couple sequential anchors left of the biggest snow patch, but the terrain was steeper and would have left us stuck if the rope came up short.)  Occasionally a rock fell, and we’d watch it gain spped so fast that it was jumping hundreds of feet per bounce.  Somewhere along the way, a rock hit the rope and cut the core about 40 feet from one end.

Climbing down
Climbing down
Dicey downclimbing
Dicey downclimbing
Yana on the way down
Yana on the way down
Yana and glacier patterns
Yana and glacier patterns
My shadow rappelling
My shadow rappelling

As we descended, the late afternoon light highlighted Martin and all the peaks east of us.

Holden Pass, Martin, Holden Lake, & Holden Tailings (plus Castle, Flora, & Riddle behind Martin)
Holden Pass, Martin, Holden Lake, & Holden Tailings (plus Castle, Flora, & Riddle behind Martin)
Pan of Martin & all its neighbors
Pan of Martin & all its neighbors
Tupshin, Reynolds, & Devore
Tupshin, Reynolds, & Devore

Finally we got down to the end of the rock.  I’ve never felt so happy to climb into a schrund.

Treading carefully
Treading carefully
Never been so glad to arrive at a schrund
Never been so glad to arrive at a schrund

We trotted down the glacier as it dropped into shadow, and the evening light made the eastern peaks even prettier.  We could even see our tents reflecting the last sunlight.

Tupshin, Devore, Wy’North, Wy’East, & Martin
Tupshin, Devore, Wy’North, Wy’East, & Martin
Shadowed seracs on the glacier
Shadowed seracs on the glacier
Descending the glacier
Descending the glacier
Camp (look for yellow tent in center of photo)
Camp (look for yellow tent in center of photo)

Behind us, the lowering sun cast shadows upward to clouds kissing the summit.

Summit shadows 1
Summit shadows 1
Summit shadows 2
Summit shadows 2
Summit shadows 3
Summit shadows 3

Now we had one final obstacle, the waterfall slabs, now even wetter than the morning.  Then, down below, two shapes appeared, hiking up from the pass.  It was Randy & Don, who had packed up some camping gear and come to rescue us, since we were so late returning.  They pointed out where they had scooted down the wet slabs and made a dynamic step across onto the snow.  We arrived back in camp just before sunset.

Wet slabs
Wet slabs
More wet slabs
More wet slabs
Traversing some steep snow after the slabs.
Traversing some steep snow after the slabs.
Last light on Copper, Fernow, 7FingerJack & Maude
Last light on Copper, Fernow, 7FingerJack & Maude

Climb stats:
Camp 6800, Holden Pass 6400, Bonanza 9511
3.8 miles round trip, 3200 gain to summit plus 400 gain back to camp, 14 hours


Day 3: Martin for some, Holden for all

The next morning, Don & Randy got up at 4am and accomplished a very efficient 5.5 hour round trip to the summit of Martin.  Coincidentally, Martin is exactly 1000 feet shorter than Bonanza.

I got up at 5am to watch the sunrise.

First light on the Fernow group and Dumbell group
First light on the Fernow group and Dumbell group
Sunrise on Bonanza
Sunrise on Bonanza
Sunrise light on the icefalls
Sunrise light on the icefalls

Studying the sunrise photos, I can also see a marked retreat of the Mary Green Glacier.  In the 2000 photo below, the icy edge of the glacier extends right to the edge of the slabs, and calved off in noisy crashes.  In the current photo below, the ice walls stop well short of the slabs, and only annual snow covers the space in between.

Mary Green Glacier in 2000
Mary Green Glacier in 2000
Mary Green Glacier in 2008
Mary Green Glacier in 2008

We had no need to hurry out of camp, since the bus wouldn’t leave Holden till 1:45 anyway.  So we  relaxed in camp and packed at a desultory pace.

Camp & Bonanza
Camp & Bonanza
Photo tent shadow
Photo tent shadow

Meanwhile the light crept down the face of Bonanza and illuminated our tracks.

Bonanza in later morning light.
Bonanza in later morning light.
Waterfalls in morning light
Waterfalls in morning light
Our tracks on the glacier
Our tracks on the glacier
Our tracks across the waterfall slabs
Our tracks across the waterfall slabs

Eventually the Martineers returned, and we left camp about 9:30am.  At Holden Lake, Yana and I took the opportunity for a swim.  The water was actually not too cold.

Matt swimming in Holden Lake
Matt swimming in Holden Lake
Yana on a log in Holden Lake
Yana on a log in Holden Lake

The trail back was hot, but had some nice flowers.  Butterflies distracted me by landing on flowers but then flying away.

Marmot browsing
Marmot browsing
Phlox?
Phlox?
Torn-winged Tiger Swallowtail
Torn-winged Tiger Swallowtail

Exit stats:  7.5 miles, 4 hours, 3600 descent

Holden was hot.  They really should open the ice cream parlor earlier in the day.  Lake Chelan was even hotter.  Dicey ordered some unusual cilantro tacos in Entiat.  With the bus, ferry, dinner & drive, it was about 10:30pm before I arrived home.

Waiting for the bus out of Holden
Waiting for the bus out of Holden

Oh, one last detail:
96!

--------------
“As beacons mountains burned at evening.” J.R.R. Tolkien
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Scrooge
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Joined: 16 Dec 2001
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Scrooge
Famous Grouse
PostSat Jul 12, 2008 3:02 am 
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Hiking ? ....... Hmmmm.          hmmm.gif

Over at CC they use a different term when they describe that kind of trip. Bonanza Peak and Tiger Mountain just don't have all that much in common. I think it's great that you all prefer our company to the company of your peers. I also think Karen had a point when she suggested dividing the Trip Reports forum into two separate sections, one for trail hikes and one for expeditions.

Pardon the side trip. ....... A great report, Matt, as always, and superb photographic documentation. Nobody does it better.

And congratulations on "96".         agree.gif         up.gif  up.gif           Are the rest of you counting?

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Something lost behind the ranges. Lost and waiting for you....... Go and find it. Go!
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picowave
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picowave
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PostSat Jul 12, 2008 3:38 am 
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Great report and beautiful pictures!

Thanks for sharing!
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Hiker Mama
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Hiker Mama
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PostSat Jul 12, 2008 5:48 am 
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WOW!  Great effort and wonderful pictures!
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Bert
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Bert
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PostSat Jul 12, 2008 11:06 am 
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Nice trip report...sounds like a good time had by all.  Quick question...what are the boots the three of you are wearing?  Thanks.
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yukon222
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yukon222
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PostSat Jul 12, 2008 11:24 am 
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Stunning report and trip.  Very glad you posted it here.   up.gif

I know I wouldn't enjoy 900' of exposed Class 3/4 rock climbing (and the downclimbing) so I most likely won't be around this peak in the near future.  But at least I am able to sort of experience the peak thru your excellent pictures and descriptions.  Thanks!!
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puzzlr
Mid Fork Rocks



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puzzlr
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PostSat Jul 12, 2008 4:01 pm 
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Congratulations to all in the party. Was this the first successful Bonanza summit for everyone?
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Bryan K
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Bryan K
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PostSat Jul 12, 2008 5:22 pm 
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Bustin' Bonanza!!!!!!! What a great looking trip. Looks like an epic adventure. Glad you all made it to the summit and back up.gif

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www.youtube.com/bkraai | www.flickr.com/photos/bkraai/sets/
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Schmidt Alti-Dude
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Schmidt Alti-Dude
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PostSat Jul 12, 2008 6:26 pm 
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Yea, yea, yea, epic trip, great photos, blah, blah, blah!

Were there any fish in Holden Lake?

--------------
Anything stated by me in no way reflects the attitudes or opinions of my wife
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Tom_Sjolseth
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Tom_Sjolseth
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PostSat Jul 12, 2008 8:19 pm 
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Nice work, Matt and company!!

Keep those TRs coming.   up.gif
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Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot



Joined: 30 Jan 2007
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Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot
PostSun Jul 13, 2008 12:54 am 
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Scrooge wrote:
Hiking ? ....... Hmmmm.          hmmm.gif

Over at CC they use a different term when they describe that kind of trip. Bonanza Peak and Tiger Mountain just don't have all that much in common. I think it's great that you all prefer our company to the company of your peers. I also think Karen had a point when she suggested dividing the Trip Reports forum into two separate sections, one for trail hikes and one for expeditions.

Aye, ‘tis a good question you raise.  I notice there are more climbing reports lately.  But I think that’s a byproduct of a larger issue.  As the site grows, there are many more reports of every kind.  I find that I have to be more selective of what I read.  As far as my reports, they’re usually clearly identified as including a climb in the first couple lines, so you can skip them if wanted.

There are three reasons I post here rather than CC.

First, the report includes a lot of hiking discussion.  Well over half the text and photos are taken along the trail and at camp.  It’s actually an appealing place for regular hiking and camping.

Second, for me, the difference between nwhikers and CC is not simply the type of travel, but a different focus for the experience.  CC tends to be focused on routes and technical accomplishments.  That’s not why I go into the mountains.  My focus is on enjoyment of the mountain environment, regardless of whether that’s experienced on a hike, climb, road walk, road trip, or whatever.  How I got there is much less important to me than appreciating whatever I find along the way.  I try to describe my whole experience of each trip in the mountains.  I enjoy reading others’ experiences, even when it’s very different from the kind of trip I might do.  I post here because I hope others here would enjoy what I describe and photograph, even if it’s not someplace they might go, and even sometimes exactly because it’s someplace they might not get to themselves.

Third, I post here because it is a mountaineering community, not just a set of reports.  I really like the people here, I enjoy their stories and comments, and I like sharing the discussion with these people.

However, though I believe all kinds of trip reports have a place here, I have come to agree with Karen’s original suggestion to split the Trip Report forum, so I’ve bumped her thread.

--------------
“As beacons mountains burned at evening.” J.R.R. Tolkien
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Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot



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Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot
PostSun Jul 13, 2008 12:55 am 
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Islandman wrote:
Nice trip report...sounds like a good time had by all.  Quick question...what are the boots the three of you are wearing?  Thanks.

Some kind of Scarpas.  Don, Randy, or Dicey would know.  Too narrow for my feet.

Schmidt Alti-Dude wrote:
Yea, yea, yea, epic trip, great photos, blah, blah, blah!
Were there any fish in Holden Lake?

Dayhikers from Holden reported catching some small fish.  Don’t know if they were in the best place, however.  Midway up the lake, there’s an arm of rocks and trees that might interest fish.

Or, to put it in your terms: Fish, fish, fish, blah, blah, blah.

BTW, the summit panorama now has labels:

--------------
“As beacons mountains burned at evening.” J.R.R. Tolkien
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Scrooge
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Scrooge
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PostSun Jul 13, 2008 7:33 am 
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Matt said
Quote:

However, though I believe all kinds of trip reports have a place here, I have come to agree with Karen’s original suggestion to split the Trip Report forum, so I’ve bumped her thread.

I agreed with Karen, originally, but the overwhelming number of counterarguments convinced me I was wrong. Aside from so many people disliking the idea, the problem of where to draw the line came to seem insurmountable.

Your Bonanza climb and Dayhike Mike's Alta-Chickamin traverse are clearly expeditions. Tiger Mountain rambles and TNAB's Thursday night hikes are clearly trail hikes (even though many of us can't hope to emulate the TNAB'rs).

But, where do I post my trips? Today we're trying again for Rachor Falls. None of it is on trail and about a mile of it is bushwhacking over unknown territory ........ but the whole thing will only take about six hours.

Or Big Four: starting with rafting the Stilly is different, but no big deal; spending an hour or two clambering over blowdown isn't exactly hiking; and exploring the ice caves (when they're there) is pretty adventurous ....... but the whole roundtrip is only about three miles! And half of it is still on accessible trail. ........ Is that an expedition?

I was worried, at first, that the peakbagging and the expedition reports would intimidate "100 Hikes" hikers, and discourage them from reporting. That doesn't appear to be the case. The majority of Snow Lake daytrippers seem to enjoy reading about your assault on the "Top 100", just like most of the Cascade peakbaggers enjoy reading about Everest expeditions, without having any particular thought of joining one.

All that aside, the group has grown, from about 40 refugees from WTA when we started, to its present level, when it's not uncommon to have 100 people viewing the site at once. If the interests of the group have changed some, I think we just have to accept it.

--------------
Something lost behind the ranges. Lost and waiting for you....... Go and find it. Go!
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Magellan
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Magellan
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PostSun Jul 13, 2008 7:57 am 
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Well Matt, you have outdone yourself.  Somehow this trip report stands out amongst your many fine efforts.  I personally won't be cramponing up waterfall slabs or scrambling 900' of unprotectable classs 3/4, but it's great to read about it.

I for one am glad for the variety of reports on this site.  I read most everything from kid hikes to Cascadian hardmen(women) epics.  Keep them coming peoples!
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Guiran
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PostSun Jul 13, 2008 8:21 am 
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Feel gripped just reading about the trip. Fantastic pictures and report as always!
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Forum Index > Trip Reports > Bonanza via Mary Green Glacier, July 6-8, 2008
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