Forum Index > Trip Reports > Sherpa Peak 06/23-24/08
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
Yana
Hater



Joined: 04 Jun 2004
Posts: 3956 | TRs
Location: Out Hating
Yana
Hater
PostFri Jun 27, 2008 8:54 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
DISCLAIMER: Yes, I realize cartman already wrote a TR. I just felt inspired to write one, so here it is.


Sherpa Peak is a sub summit of Mt. Stuart and is less than three quarters of a mile from its looming and overwhelmingly large neighbor. Despite its paltry 405 feet of prominence, it draws attention due to the crazy balanced rocks in the summit area (and also because it's got enough height and enough prominence to be on a bunch of peak lists, like Washington's highest 100, for example).

Sherpa Peak from 6300' to the south
Sherpa Peak from 6300' to the south

Despite these various charming attractions, Sherpa Peak sees very few ascents per year (last year, there were seven parties total to summit according to the summit register).

Much like all those other people not found in the summit register, I'd previously only admired the peak from afar in a "oh, that's an interestingly shaped thing" sort of way. Then, seemingly out of the blue last week, dicey suggested that this would be a good trip destination. After a careful deliberation of precisely 1.3 seconds, I agreed. I really only have myself to blame for being such an easy target. Somehow, we sucked (suckered?) Matt and cartman into the trip as well.

There are a number of routes and variations up Sherpa. The main two that  we considered were the south route (finishes on the east ridge) and the west ridge. I initially wanted to do the west ridge because, despite being the more technical of the two routes, routefinding seemed to be easier according to all the guidebooks and trip reports we had found. However, we ended up deciding to do the much less technical route instead due to it... er... being less technical. Good reason, no?

We all brought along some light reading in the form of trip reports and guidebook descriptions. In fact, I think had we needed to, we had enough paper to keep a large bonfire burning for most of the night.

But first, we had to get near the peak! This involved hiking to Longs Pass, then down to Ingalls Creek. Patchy snow started in that maddeningly meandering section of the Ingalls Way  trail about 1/2 mile before the Longs Pass trail branches off. The north side of Longs Pass will be snowbound for some time to come. Longs Pass was beautiful but forbiddingly breezy as usual and the overcast skies served to hasten our departure. The 1400' of elevation loss to Ingalls Creek is painful, very painful. We crossed Ingalls Creek on the now familiar log (harder with overnight packs than with day packs).

We then followed the Ingalls Creek trail for what is supposedly 1/2 mile but actually feels like twice as much. Right before the trail junction with the Beverly Turnpike Trail, a very well beaten path branches off to the left through a cheerful, flower filled meadow. In fact, it was too well beaten for being the approach to a summit that sees so few ascents per year.  paranoid.gif  In addition to this bothersome aspect of the path, we nearly lost Matt, who was suddenly overwhelmed with the urge to wander around the flowers: 
Matt wanders around the flowers
Matt wanders around the flowers

After we managed to drag him away from that particular clump of flowers, we began huffing and puffing up the very steep path. It weaves through meadow, then forest, then slide alder, then more meadow, and eventually ends up meeting up with a stream in a gully.

The gully very quickly gets ugly, and our objective at this point was, as one guidebook description charmingly put it, to "mount the buttress" on the other (east) side of the stream. This for some unfathomable reason involved scrambling up slabby rock covered in sand. We all tried to follow the path of least resistance, but I still found myself at one point bodily hauling myself and my oversized pack up by some stupid alder branches. I almost wish I had a photo so I could share with you all how utterly ridiculous this was.

I never knew mounting a buttress was such hard work!  dizzy.gif

Well, we all had our different strategies for buttress mounting, and for this reason we once again misplaced Matt for a while. Basically, he was following one route description and we were following a different one. After being reunited on the buttress around 6400', we all decided that we would find a suitable bivy site nearby as we were all suddenly gripped by a complete lack of desire to go anywhere. It may have had something to do with the fact that the sun had finally come out. I even caught dicey sitting on a rock doing absolutely nothing!!!  eek.gif

Carla and some Teanaway stuff
Carla and some Teanaway stuff

After searching for a bivy spot for a few minutes, we found a pretty neat one near a jumble of boulders that not only provided shelter from the wind, but also entertainment.

Exploring the bivy site
Exploring the bivy site

After dinner, we brought out our acre of route beta and went to stare at it and the mountain. After much staring and debating and discussion, we decided that perhaps the long snow filled gully on the right would be the way to gain the east ridge.

Sherpa from near camp
Sherpa from near camp

Matt, who is all kinds of awesome, decided to kick some steps in the snow for the next day. Meawhile, dicey and I thought we could get a better look at the route from higher up on the buttress. Though not terribly illuminating in that regard, we did discover why the path was so well-beaten: it's an alternate route up Mt. Stuart. I beg any of you that are considering doing the scramble route on Stuart: please please PLEASE take this path instead of the Cascadian Couloir. You will not only avoid loose blocky doom, but this is actually a much more scenic, albeit slightly longer, route. It looks like it joins up with the "standard" scramble route just where the Cascadian broadens out into fields of talus.

The sunset was frustratingly swallowed by some incoming clouds, but when I woke up later that night, the sky was full of brilliant stars. As is typical of June, the night was all too short and soon I was up enjoying the new day dawning.

Rainier at sunrise
Rainier at sunrise

After some of us enjoyed a rather disturbing breakfast,

Eric and his dubous choice of foods
Eric and his dubous choice of foods

we set off for the snow gully. Matt's previously kicked steps proved very handy on the frozen solid snow, particularly on the descent from the buttress into the basin below Sherpa.

Starting out in the morning
Starting out in the morning

There would be no step kicking this morning, just cramponing on and on and on. There were some stupid local clouds, but Mt. Rainier was enjoying some sun.

Why is it sunny over there and cloudy over here?
Why is it sunny over there and cloudy over here?

The gully was hard work, with no place to really rest (though all of us except for Matt did "relax" in a moat for a few minutes about half way up). After clawing our way several hundred feet up the gully, we reached the next stage - the melted out portion full of loose rock. YES!!! I think we were basically following the same route as Randy took (as described in his Sherpa TR from a few years ago), going left then right at the forks in the gully. We apparently weren't quite finished with the snow and we had to put the crampons back for one maddeningly short stretch about 200' below the east ridge.

More steep hard snow on the way up
More steep hard snow on the way up

We popped out on the 8000' notch in the east ridge, from where much of the enchantments' pointy bits came into view. 
Rocky things
Rocky things

We enjoyed fun scrambling and hiking for a couple hundred vertical feet before coming to an unfortunate chimney with a chockstone at the top. I think most people bypass this by climbing to the left, but we just went straight up the thing. The chimney is deep and well protected from sunlight and thus still full of very hard snow which Matt had to chop steps up. We shamelessly used the slings to aid up and over the chockstone and came out on another sandy bench area, where we left some of our extraneous gear (ice axes, crampons). I put on my rock shoes, since I'd brought them.

We crossed over to the south side of the ridge, where after traversing some more sandy benches we came to the first more inclined bit of climbing:
The first harder bit
The first harder bit

I erroneously thought that Matt would want to pitch this section out, so I started thinking about setting up a belay. However, when he arrived, he just wandered by and started climbing up it. We stopped him before he'd gotten too far and gave him a rope to take up and set up as a safety line so the rest of us were not in mortal peril while ascending.

Eric on the first "pitch"
Eric on the first "pitch"

This pitch put us just north of the balanced rocks. From here, we could see some  slings about 160' horizontal feet away. Once again, we generously volunteered Matt to lead this thing to the slings. It's not difficult, though somewhat awkward and spectacularly exposed in a couple of places. I was happy to have my rock shoes as they made things fun and less scary.

Once again, I brought up the rear. While I was waiting for dicey and cartman to cross, I was watching Matt, who was now wandering all over the mountain, apparently looking for the route.

Matt looking for the route
Matt looking for the route

By the time I was across that traverse, Matt had already chosen another traverse that looked like the only viable way to get to the summit. The traverse was exposed and, much worse, loose in a number of places. Eek!!! It ended just west of the summit, where Matt was looking up into a gully and declaring that he thought it would go. While we were still picking our way through the sketchy traverse below, Matt went up the gully and soon popped out on the ridge above us. Yay!

Unfortunately for us, Matt had no rope with him, so we were left contemplating climbing the steep 4th class gully with no safety line. I was getting used to the mortal danger factor a little bit by then, so I volunteered to trail a rope up the damn thing. The rock was generally sound and the holds mostly good as I made my way up. I made a point to not look down under any circumstances. It was going fairly smoothly, except for right at the very end where I misjudged the size of my helmet and hit my head on a projecting rock. Boy, that would have been a stupid way to go!

I joined Matt at the rappel/belay station (another big boulder with slings), where we attached the rope for the others to prusik up.

Matt near the summit
Matt near the summit

While we were just sitting there waiting for the others, we decided that one of us should lead the 30' foot mostly horizontal pitch to the summit. From my vantage point, it looked like a very mellow slab with nice cracks for hands and feet, with maybe one small step. I volunteered to go up there and Matt put me on belay. As soon as I stood up from the belay station, I realized that this short pitch was a little more interesting than I first thought as it was bisected by two fissures that I hadn't seen from the belay station. Oops!

The climbing was actually not difficult across the two "holes," just daunting! Being new to gear leads, I placed entirely more pro than was necessary. I soon joined the multitudes of ladybugs at the summit and set up an anchor so the others could come across. This is when I realized I had committed a fatal mistake by not bringing my camera (it was in my pack, which I had not brought from the belay station). Sigh.

We hung out at the summit for a while, soaking up the sun and the views, especially of that crazy balanced rock. From the summit, the balanced rock clearly appears taller than the summit. Fortunately for us, the summit register is not on that thing!  dizzy.gif

As we still had a long way to go, we left the summit way too soon. We reversed our route on the way down. It seems like there's a way to avoid the exposed first traverse that we pitched out (judging by the rappel slings at the end of that pitch), but not knowing where rappelling from there would lead, we chose to just go back the way we came. In retrospect, we should have left the rope fixed here since we had two ropes. Oops!

Making our way back across the first traverse
Making our way back across the first traverse

On the rappel after the traverse, I happened to look down and spied a red thing sprawled among the rocks.

OMG! Who killed Matt?!
OMG! Who killed Matt?!

My heart leapt into my throat for a second until I realized it was Matt taking a very well deserved nap while the rest of us rappelled.

Rapping down the first pitch
Rapping down the first pitch

We gathered up our stashed gear, and one more rappel and some easy hiking/scrambling led us back to the notch, where we were "buzzed" by a glider plane!

Glider plane
Glider plane

We still had a lot of work to do and were soon downclimbing the chossy gully.

Down the gully we go
Down the gully we go

It was with sweet relief that we got back to the snow. I thought it would be mushy due to it being in the sun all day, but alas, it was not as mushy as expected (though much better than the solid ice of that morning), and more painful descending ensued.

Coming down the snow gully... still a little too firm
Coming down the snow gully... still a little too firm

Once out of the gully and in the basin just across from our bivy site, we stopped for a minute and I admired the pretty waterfalls.

Waterfalls in the basin
Waterfalls in the basin

It was already 5:30 by the time we reached camp. It was beginning to look like another hike out in the dark! The worst part of the entire trip for me was descending the buttress down into the gully, once again on sand covered slabby rock of DOOM. I thought I might sit down and cry at one point, but everyone else was watching me come down, so I thought I'd better save it for later.  lol.gif

Down the steep trail we went to the longest "1/2 mile" on a trail ever. we noted that the tent of the party doing the West Ridge of Stuart was still pitched, unoccupied (this was at 9 pm). We met them in the parking lot as we were leaving on Monday. I don't know if they intended to bivy on route. Hope everything turned out okay for them.

Crossing the log over Ingalls Creek (now uphill) on the way back with a heavy overnight pack was just brutal, which is probably why Matt decided to just walk across the damn thing. The rest of us were not feeling nearly as adventurous so we slithered our way up as usual. From here it was 1400' more elevation gain back to Longs Pass in the quickly dissipating daylight. At least Mount Stuart had some pretty things going on with the evening light.

Stuart in the evening light
Stuart in the evening light

We actually somehow managed not to need headlamps until about a mile and a half away from the trailhead, though I did become convinced in that flat section of trail that we were just walking in a big, flat circle over and over again.  shakehead.gif

The "crux" of this trip proved to be driving back to Seattle without falling asleep. I was momentarily shocked into alertness near Cle Elum by a deer hanging out in the middle of the road, and later forced to stay awake by threats from dicey that she would pour her coffee in my lap if I looked like I was falling asleep.

All in all another great trip, though I can see why Sherpa Peak is so rarely visited.

ETA: The one bad thing about this trip is that dicey developed a strong and irreversible hatred of my climbing rope, which she had the dubious honor of lugging up and down most of Sherpa Peak. It was placed under the lid of her pack and would periodically snag on rocks and branches, and would also try to "ooze" out one side or the other. I'm deeply sorry, dicey. Please don't hurt my climbing rope, I can't afford a new one right now!

THE END

twirl.gif  chickenleg.gif  dance.gif  stuck.gif  party.gif  banana.gif  rockband.gif  wub.gif  guns.gif  ha.gif  up.gif  cool.gif  tongue.gif

--------------
PLAY SAFE! SKI ONLY IN CLOCKWISE DIRECTION! LET'S ALL HAVE FUN TOGETHER!
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
GaliWalker
Have camera will use



Joined: 10 Dec 2007
Posts: 3698 | TRs
Location: Pittsburgh
GaliWalker
Have camera will use
PostFri Jun 27, 2008 9:09 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
That was one entertaining trip report! Really, really enjoyable.  up.gif

--------------
'Gali'Walker => 'Mountain-pass' walker
bobbi: "...don't you ever forget your camera!"
Photography site: http://galiwalker.zenfolio.com/
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
GeoTom
Custom Title



Joined: 19 May 2005
Posts: 3168 | TRs
Location: Location
GeoTom
Custom Title
PostFri Jun 27, 2008 9:13 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Very entertaining read Yana.  agree.gif

--------------
Signature
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
wildernessed
viewbagger



Joined: 31 Oct 2004
Posts: 8782 | TRs
Location: Wenatchee
wildernessed
viewbagger
PostFri Jun 27, 2008 9:54 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
You guys are all incredible up.gif . Everytime I read one of your reports I think of that photo of the log crossing  you did over Ingalls to get to Stuart last year. eek.gif I hate log crossings.

--------------
Living in the Anthropocene
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
twodogdad
Member
Member


Joined: 21 Nov 2006
Posts: 844 | TRs
Location: seattle
twodogdad
Member
PostFri Jun 27, 2008 1:19 pm 
sherpa
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Bravo Yanche: here's bulgar beer cheers.gif for you!

Now tell the truth, what was tougher? First alpine lead (under D M C scrutiny hairy.gif ) or first year in high school ( banghead.gif )? Teacher's  up.gif 2dd
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Yana
Hater



Joined: 04 Jun 2004
Posts: 3956 | TRs
Location: Out Hating
Yana
Hater
PostFri Jun 27, 2008 2:20 pm 
Re: sherpa
Reply to topic Reply with quote
twodogdad wrote:

Now tell the truth, what was tougher? First alpine lead (under D M C scrutiny hairy.gif ) or first year in high school ( banghead.gif )? Teacher's  up.gif

Well, my first alpine lead was definitely much shorter  and less grueling than the first year of teaching!  embarassedlaugh.gif

However, I can say without a doubt that nothing I ever do in the mountains will be as difficult or frightening as teaching!

--------------
PLAY SAFE! SKI ONLY IN CLOCKWISE DIRECTION! LET'S ALL HAVE FUN TOGETHER!
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
goats gone wild
Mr. Goat



Joined: 19 Aug 2007
Posts: 2525 | TRs
Location: Vampireville
goats gone wild
Mr. Goat
PostFri Jun 27, 2008 2:43 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
My palms are sweaty.   eek.gif

--------------
.....leaving me wanting to return over and over in what ever capacity that may be, even if one day my knees are too old and I can only see the mountains from my porch.

Jason Hummel
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Randy
Cube Rat



Joined: 18 Dec 2001
Posts: 2844 | TRs
Location: Near the Siamangs
Randy
Cube Rat
PostFri Jun 27, 2008 7:15 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Thanks for the great TR Yana. Fun to relive this climb through your pictures report. I remember those fissures on the last bit!  biggrin.gif
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot



Joined: 30 Jan 2007
Posts: 4032 | TRs
Location: Shoreline
Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot
PostTue Aug 12, 2008 11:21 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I never quite finished writing my own report for our Sherpa climb, but I recently received some questions about the East Ridge Route, so here’s my route description, plus some photos of the trip.

(Since both cartman and Yana had both already posted reports, I flipped a coin to decide which place to append my report.  Yana’s report won, or perhaps lost, depending how you think of it.  Please also read cartman's report.)

Sherpa is located on the eastern end of the Mt. Stuart massif.  As an 8605-foot peak, it would stand out anywhere else, but here it tends to be dwarfed by its 9415-foot neighbor.  However, when you’re on Sherpa, it seems plenty prominent in its own right.  Sherpa has a very narrow steep summit crest, which requires some climbing via any approach.  The alleged summit is at the west end of the summit crest, but it’s closely challenged by Sherpa’s most distinctive feature, the balanced rock that stands out prominently at the east end.  Whichever end is higher, Sherpa provided one of the most airy summits I’ve visited.

Stuart & Sherpa from Longs Pass
Stuart & Sherpa from Longs Pass
Sherpa summit  – west summit is hidden behind the balanced rock
Sherpa summit  – west summit is hidden behind the balanced rock
Balanced Rock
Balanced Rock
Very airy summit area
Very airy summit area

Sherpa East Ridge Route

Approach hike:
From the Esmerelda Basin trailhead (4200 feet) proceed to Longs Pass (6200) via the Esmerelda Basin, Ingalls Lake, & Longs Pass trails.  Then descend to Ingalls Creek (4900).  Take the Ingalls Creek trail west about half a mile to just before its junction with the Beverly Turnpike Trail (4800).  There find a way trail in meadows heading uphill toward Sherpa.  Follow the surprisingly clear trail up through meadows, forest & only a bit of brush to 6100, where it crosses a creek.  From here the goal is to cross the buttress that has formed to the east, preferably staying not much higher thatn 6200-6300 feet.  On the other side, you’re in a basin of scattered forest and boulders directly below Sherpa, with alleged camps available circa 6500 feet.  An additional possible camp is on a wide rock ledge circa 7200 feet.

Gaining Sherpa’s East Ridge:   
From the 6500-foot basin, there is a rock wall directly above.
If you go left of the wall, you can follow open terrain to Sherpa’s West Ridge.
Directly above the wall and directly below Sherpa’s summit, there is a wide central gully that leads to cliffs below the summit.
The two options for the east ridge are further right.  The goal is to reach the 8100-foot col at the east end of the east ridge.
Furthest right is a gully that terminates at the col.  It appears less steep in its upper sections, but possibly cliffy down lower.
We used the gully somewhat right of the sumit.  It is a long steep gully leading directly upward.  We hiked up steep snow from 7000 to 7500 feet, then turned left for a couple hundred feet, then back right on mixed rock and rubble to climb out of our gully and into the far right gully not far below the col.

Sherpa summit gullies
Sherpa summit gullies
Another view – we took the long narrow gully just right of center
Another view – we took the long narrow gully just right of center
6500-basin in morning, with glowing Rainier
6500-basin in morning, with glowing Rainier
Up the gully
Up the gully

Seven-Step Plan for Sherpa East Ridge Route

Step 1: East Ridge Crest Scramble
Follow the crest of the east ridge upward, 2nd class scrambling.  At one point, there is a small chimney blocked by chockstones, with a variety of old runners for aid in climbing over the chockstones (brief 5th class move).  Beyond, that proceed to a wide area with some sandy benches, where further progress is blocked by a steep outcrop on the ridge.
East ridge scramble above col
East ridge scramble above col
Chockstone
Chockstone

Step 2: Traverse to South Side
Make a short traverse left onto the south side of the ridge (2nd/3rd class) and continue slightly upward to a wide sandy area with high rock walls ahead.

Step 3: South Side Gully
Climb a slanting 4th-class gully to regain the ridge crest, just east of the Balanced Rock.  (I led this gully unroped; others self-belayed with prussik on top rope.  All rappeled on descent.)
Wide area and south side gully, on descent
Wide area and south side gully, on descent
Ascending south side gully
Ascending south side gully

Step 4: North Side Slab Traverse
Immediately move onto the north side of the crest for a low 5th class traverse on steep slabs.  A crack along the top of the slabs provides handholds and protection, but the lichen-covered slabs offer questionable footing.  (We belayed this pitch in both directions.)
(This traverse takes you below and past the Balanced Rock, which is a couple hundred feet above.  From the end of this traverse, you can scramble/climb steep terrain upward to reach the crest just west of the Balanced Rock, but an intermediate outcrop prevents traveling further westward, so it’s not a viable route to the summit.)
North side slab traverse, viewed from far end
North side slab traverse, viewed from far end
Yana cleaning the traverse
Yana cleaning the traverse

Step 5: North Side Scrambling Traverse
Continue a longer 2nd/3rd class traverse westward until you are just past the summit block.  This traverse wanders up and down several times, but there is a path that can be scrambled without protection.
North side scrambling traverse, with north side gully hidden at far end
North side scrambling traverse, with north side gully hidden at far end
North side scrambling traverse viewed from north side gully
North side scrambling traverse viewed from north side gully

Step 6: North Side Gully
Climb a slanting (partially hidden) 4th class gully to gain the crest just  west of the summit, which is also the location where the difficult pitch of the West Ridge route tops out.  The gully is less than half a rope length.  (I explored up the gully but forgot to trail a rope.  Yana led a rope up the gully; others self-belayed on top rope.  All rappelled on descent.)
Dicey near top of north side gully
Dicey near top of north side gully
Descending north side gully
Descending north side gully

Step 7: Summit Slabs
Travel steep slabs about 50 feet to the summit area.  The slabs are short, but include a couple challenging gaps to climb across.  (Yana led this pitch.)
Yana leading the summit slabs
Yana leading the summit slabs
Cartman following summit slabs, Dicey at top of north side gully
Cartman following summit slabs, Dicey at top of north side gully

More Photos

Approach Hike:

Smiling, trailhead
Smiling, trailhead
Not smiling, Longs Pass
Not smiling, Longs Pass
Ingalls Creek Log Crossing
Ingalls Creek Log Crossing
Trilliums in creek valley
Trilliums in creek valley
Shooting stars
Shooting stars
Flower by Sherpa way trail
Flower by Sherpa way trail

Summit Photos:

Matt in summit area
Matt in summit area
Yana relaxing
Yana relaxing
Summit group
Summit group
Summit & Stuart
Summit & Stuart
Yana chevaling to touch the exact summit
Yana chevaling to touch the exact summit
The fin Yana was chevaling on - ouch
The fin Yana was chevaling on - ouch
Summit Ladybugs
Summit Ladybugs
Summit neighbors - Enchanments, Colchuck, Dragontail, Argonaut
Summit neighbors - Enchanments, Colchuck, Dragontail, Argonaut

Descending:

Looking back down to basin and Longs Pass
Looking back down to basin and Longs Pass
Steep descent, Yancy
Steep descent, Yancy
Steep descent, Dina
Steep descent, Dina
Less steep view of descent
Less steep view of descent
Goat near camp
Goat near camp
Going backup the Ingalls Creek log
Going backup the Ingalls Creek log

One final statistic:
95

--------------
“As beacons mountains burned at evening.” J.R.R. Tolkien
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Roald
Member
Member


Joined: 06 Aug 2007
Posts: 348 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Roald
Member
PostTue Aug 12, 2008 11:46 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Matt - thank you for the detailed description!  Thx to Cartman and Yana too.  Great pics, and it looks like a great time. smile.gif

Saaay, there can't be snow up there this late in the year, can there? huh.gif
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
DIYSteve
mere tourist



Joined: 06 Mar 2007
Posts: 11489 | TRs
Location: here now
DIYSteve
mere tourist
PostWed Aug 13, 2008 8:03 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Great TR and pics by both of you.   up.gif  That route sounds and looks tougher than the W ridge.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Yana
Hater



Joined: 04 Jun 2004
Posts: 3956 | TRs
Location: Out Hating
Yana
Hater
PostWed Aug 13, 2008 8:26 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Woo hoo! I've been looking forward to these photos for a long time, thanks for posting them, Matt. I like your "seven step plan" for the summit, also.  lol.gif

And I would still like to know what was up with the mysterious rap station below the ridge (the one where we ended the traverse pitch). Anyone? Randy? Bueller? Buuuuuuuueeeeeellllleeeeeerrr?


However, you might want to relabel a couple of photos. Whereas I don't mind being mistaken for dicey, I don't think the reverse is true. clown.gif
Matt wrote:

Steep descent, Dicey
Steep descent, Dicey
Steep descent, Yana
Steep descent, Yana


--------------
PLAY SAFE! SKI ONLY IN CLOCKWISE DIRECTION! LET'S ALL HAVE FUN TOGETHER!
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Scrooge
Famous Grouse



Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 6960 | TRs
Location: wishful thinking
Scrooge
Famous Grouse
PostWed Aug 13, 2008 8:28 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Roald asked
Quote:
Saaay, there can't be snow up there this late in the year, can there?

Check the date of Yana's report. I made the same mistake.       suuure.gif

Several pictures caught my eye, for one reason or another.


What remarkable mountains in our little Cascade Range. This looks like one of MVS's pictures from the Alps.


This one reminds me of Seneca Rock, West Virginia, definitely a rockclimber's rock .......... and not a place for sensible mountaineers.


Optical illusion? ......... Or am I the only one who thinks Yana is practicing for a yacht race?

--------------
Something lost behind the ranges. Lost and waiting for you....... Go and find it. Go!
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
John Morrow
Member
Member


Joined: 03 Apr 2007
Posts: 1229 | TRs
Location: Roslyn
John Morrow
Member
PostWed Aug 13, 2008 8:36 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Roald wrote:
Matt - thank you for the detailed description!  Thx to Cartman and Yana too.  Great pics, and it looks like a great time. :)

Saaay, there can't be snow up there this late in the year, can there? :huh:

Wow Matt,
Awesome route description and great reads from all.
Of note: the Ingalls Creek crossing is now an easy boulder hop, no log necessary, yeah.
And there is no longer any snow in the approach gully, not so yeah!
John
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot



Joined: 30 Jan 2007
Posts: 4032 | TRs
Location: Shoreline
Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot
PostWed Aug 13, 2008 9:41 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Yana wrote:
However, you might want to relabel a couple of photos. Whereas I don't mind being mistaken for dicey, I don't think the reverse is true. clown.gif

Okay, I fixed the captions, so it will work either way.
Steep descent, Yancy
Steep descent, Yancy
Steep descent, Dina
Steep descent, Dina

--------------
“As beacons mountains burned at evening.” J.R.R. Tolkien
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Trip Reports > Sherpa Peak 06/23-24/08
  Happy Birthday ashish.chouhan!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy