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Forum Index -> Stewardship -> Energy Sources/Improvements on the Horizon
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straydog
slave to a monolith



Joined: 19 Apr 2008
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Post Wed May 11, 2011 5:57 pm   
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yes.. and the key to it is that it relies on deuterium ion intertia with magnetic confinement rather than heat produced by magnetic compression to achieve fusion. They are also considering Boron-Proton fusion. They've had tremendous difficulty in getting funding over the years (competing for NIF and ITER funds), so the Navy funding has been keeping them afloat. Interestingly, they've made all of their progress on only about $27M. Before he died, Bussard believed that they could make a fully operational reactor with ion densities and fusion rates high enough for positive power gain for about $100M-$200M. But like ITER and NIF, extracting usable energy will be a huge design and materials challenge.

A series of video interviews with Thomas Ligon covers much of their work and has some very good explanations of how it Polywell fusion works and it's challenges.
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Dayhike Mike
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Joined: 02 Mar 2003
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Post Wed May 11, 2011 7:39 pm   
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How does it compare to the Rockwell Turbo Encabulator?


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"There is only one basic human right, the right to do as you damn well please. And with it comes the only basic human duty, the duty to take the consequences." -P.J. O'Rourke
"Ignorance is natural. Stupidity takes commitment." -Solomon Short
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straydog
slave to a monolith



Joined: 19 Apr 2008
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Location: North Bend
Post Wed May 11, 2011 7:51 pm   
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Well it won't operate nofer trunnions and lacks a barescent skor motion but it could be employed in conjunction with a drawn reciprocating dingle arm to reduce sinusoidal depleneration of the magnets. But of course that will require tritium ions  dizzy.gif
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Malachai Constant
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Post Wed May 11, 2011 8:32 pm   
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Chrono-Synclastic Infundibulum

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"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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treeswarper
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Joined: 25 Dec 2006
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 7:28 am   
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2.5 cords of wood for my house last winter.
My highest power bills are $50 a month.
New house, it is what some would consider small, plus insulation and modern windows.  Big windows too.  Ancient technology also works.  I realize wood heat is not a good thing for densely populated areas, but most folks around here use it.

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Keep cuttin' 'em... we'll keep growin' 'em! Welcome to the Great Pacific Northwest! --Madhatte
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alpinelakes
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 4:00 pm   
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A landmark report on renewable energy from the UN set off some interesting discussion on Metafilter today. Which led me to a rather succinct quote from technologist Bill Joy:

One, there is tremendous need and potential for economic innovation in clean technologies, even as we approach physical limitations in how efficiently they can produce energy. These will be essential, as we need to buy down the cost of clean tech to the point where it "beats the grid unsubsidized."

Two, we need to be building things in America. Manufacturing will be a vital and economically invigorating component of the transition to clean energy, and missing out on that opportunity would be devastating to American competitiveness and economic health. Without manufacturing, says Joy, we will become overly dependent on a service economy, which will "run idle."

Three, government support is required for private ventures to "cross the chasm" that prevents the free market from achieving the energy technology goals we aspire to. Prompted by a question from the audience, Joy said his preferred government policy is loan guarantees, which have mostly been used in the past for projects with high upfront capital expenditures. (from theenergycollective.com)

Interesting to see that Japan has cancelled all plans for future nuclear plants.

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MtnGoat
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 4:02 pm   
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Points two and three are self destructive fallacies.

Point two is destructive to trade and the ascension of the vital process of division of labor. Taken to it's actual conclusion, Oregon should not be trading with Washington, nor Seattle with Tacoma.

Point three does not account for the actual time value cost of the subsidies carried into the future.

The true cost of the supposely cheaper future results is the time cost plus interest of ALL of the subsidies from the first second they are paid. Except for very, very minor subsidies, I suspect there are few if any cases in which the supposed savings of a subsidized outcome was not dwarfed by the time value of the sum of the subsidies over the duration until the subsidized product was 'viable'. A state, I might add, it is in the producers interest to avoid in the interest of guaranteed subsidy money.

On the third point I guess my take is this...make all the moral and other arguments desired, but supposed savings of any kind from subsidy when looked at in the proper light is pretty dubious.

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Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
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alpinelakes
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 4:13 pm   
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How so?

We should continue to reduce our manufacturing and jobs? Let the chinese and the indians decide our future for us?

How can new technologies compete aginst the massively subsidised oil & weapons industry?

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MtnGoat
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 4:29 pm   
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Who said manufacturing was the be all end all of goals? Is it written somewhere that the industrial configuration of some past decade is the 'best' for later decades? Those jobs are going away because the creative destruction of the market is moving  that capital elsewhere.

It seems to me being wedded to any particular arrangement and simply mandating and pushing that one is the exact kind of thing that led to housing bubbles. These fixations are counterproductive in a dynamic world.

Why is it that Shelton should ship logs to Centralia to be milled? THat takes mill jobs from Shelton, after all. The well meaning provincialism evidenced by the protectionist sentiments are counterproductive.

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Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
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MtnGoat
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 4:33 pm   
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In reading the three points again I come to the conclusion that point one is merely restated in different form as a justification in point three.

If an alternative energy source is actually competitive for real, then it will compete on it's own merits in the existing price structure.

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Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
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bopack
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 4:35 pm   
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Sounds like Mtn Goat would not mind relocating, or he's retired.

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MtnGoat
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 4:55 pm   
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I'm not sure what the problem is. Attempting stasis is not a good idea, and true innovation breaks through on it's own. What's so contentious? I think all the experimenting is great, and I can think that and oppose further rigging of the situation at the same time.

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Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
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alpinelakes
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 6:22 pm   
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Hmmm

What do you mean by "actual time value cost of the subsidies carried into the future"?  Can you clarify that? Does it mean  anything at all?

Manufacturing the next wave of technology would help to IMPROVE our current trade imbalance. This would be a good thing.

And "the ascension of the vital process of division of labor". You're just trolling my post, aren't you?

Who said manufacturing was the be all end all of goals? You did, right there. I didn't. It would be beneficial to our economy, if we added jobs.

So, you want unsubsidized new tech to compete with oil, which we subsidize to the tune of TRILLIONS of dollars.

Are you a paid astroturfer? I mean, your argument makes no sense to me unless you have some sort of corporate agenda. I don't get it.

Bill Joy's Decarbonization talk impressed me with its common sense approach to energy policy. Sorry if you didn't like it.

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MtnGoat
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Post Thu May 12, 2011 7:02 pm   
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alpinelakes wrote:
Hmmm

What do you mean by "actual time value cost of the subsidies carried into the future"?  Can you clarify that?

Sure. The actual cost of the entire subsidy program is actually the value of that money had it been invested at a rate of return consistent with market rates.

After all, that money is not available for market use since it has been routed to subsidy. The opportunity cost is actually two fold, the zero sum transfer as a subsidy ...when the market spending it would have increased wealth. Then the value that money would have had as an investment yielding a return, evaluated over the time period of the subsidy itself.

I'll get to the rest later.

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Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
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touron
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Joined: 15 Sep 2003
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Post Sun Jun 05, 2011 11:35 am   
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Quote:
Ford is developing its smallest engine ever, a wee little three-cylinder mill with the displacement of a soda bottle.

The tiny engine is part of the automakerís push to increase the fuel efficiency of its lineup by building smaller, but more powerful, engines. Despite its itty-bitty size, Ford says the turbocharged 1.0-liter Ecoboost engine will provide the torque and power of a 1.8 1.6-liter four-cylinder.



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Touron is a nougat of Arabic origin made with almonds and honey or sugar, without which it would just not be Christmas in Spain.
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