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RPBrown
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PostSun Apr 13, 2014 10:33 pm 
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Jake,

Sorry, I missed your message somehow.  I love hearing stories like that.  It validates all the stories I heard over the years.  Thank you for sharing!!
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RodF
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PostMon Apr 14, 2014 12:55 am 
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http://www.nwhikers.net/forums/viewtopic.php?p=840730

RPBrown wrote:
Having said all that, I think the shelter you are showing for the Big Quilcene Forks is a mistake.  They have to be referring to Bark Shanty.

The 1937 report listing the shelters, posted here, lists both Bark Shanty with an estimated 100 visitors/season and Big Quilcene Forks with 150, suggesting these were two distinct sites.
But I've seen no other map or document mentioning it, so it might be a clerical error, or a shelter that was short-lived (fire, windfall,...?) and not replaced because the Bark Shanty road had been extended past it?

RPBrown wrote:
This 1932 map (below) shows a telephone line at Constance Pass.  Interestingly, it is not shown on my 1930 map.

Great catch, Rich!  That's Jim Taplin's "Olympic Trail Guide", but I didn't realize there were two distinct 1930 and 1932 editions.  Mace kindly posted photos of the 1932 edition at this link.

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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RPBrown
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PostMon Apr 14, 2014 8:15 am 
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Rod,

I hear what you are saying and do not disagree.  There certainly could have been a shelter at the Big Quil Forks for a very short time.  I would say that it is highly unlikely since the road was punched up to that point by 1926-27, when the dam was built.  It also seems unlikely that they would build two shelters only a couple miles apart, unless of course maybe the Big Quil Forks Shelter was destroyed right away and they then decided to build one a little further upriver at Bark Shanty.

Also, I didn't say what I meant.  Both the 1930 and 32 map show a cabin just downstream of the original Shelter Rock.

Bark Shanty Camp first shows on the 1932 map.  It is noticeably absent on the 1930 map.

Good stuff!  Very much enjoy the discussion.
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reststep
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PostMon Apr 14, 2014 9:55 am 
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Fascinating discussion.  Thank you so much for posting. Great maps also.

I have always wondered where the name for the present day Shelter Rock Camp on the Quilcene came from.  Now I am going to have to go up there and look for the rock you talk about.

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"The mountains are calling and I must go." - John Muir
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Chico
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PostFri Sep 26, 2014 8:09 pm 
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Home Sweet Home and Low Divide replacement shelters 2002

Extracted from a PDF at link

Never flown in due to a lawsuit.

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PostSun Sep 28, 2014 7:49 pm 
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Shannon Martinson graciously provided these photos of the Smith Place in the Queets Valley during its heyday in the early 1930s.

Many thanks to Cyclopath and Ancient Ambler for their help with the images.

I am posting these here in this thread for now, as I do not have access presently to my archived information in the other two computers.

Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View east of Smith Place. Smith addition on right. Shaube homestead cabin center. Structure left of metal chimney Smith addition. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View east of Smith Place. Smith addition on right. Shaube homestead cabin center. Structure left of metal chimney Smith addition. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View of north wall of Smith addition. Note stone fireplace, Navajo rug and wall hangings. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View of north wall of Smith addition. Note stone fireplace, Navajo rug and wall hangings. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - view of northeast corner of Smith addition. Note peeled spruce log bunks hung with chains from ceiling, Navaho rug and wall hangings. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - view of northeast corner of Smith addition. Note peeled spruce log bunks hung with chains from ceiling, Navaho rug and wall hangings. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View of east wall in Smith addition. Note Navajo rug, wall hangings. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View of east wall in Smith addition. Note Navajo rug, wall hangings. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View southeast showing Smith additions on Shaube homestead cabin and outbuilding in background. Note fenced garden area in foreground and fruit trees on right. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View southeast showing Smith additions on Shaube homestead cabin and outbuilding in background. Note fenced garden area in foreground and fruit trees on right. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View north from center of clearing. Structure in background presumably barn/woodshed. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View north from center of clearing. Structure in background presumably barn/woodshed. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View south from center of clearing. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - View south from center of clearing. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - Oscar Smith on right wearing hat. photo courtesy S. Martinson
Smith Place - Queets Valley - 1930s - Oscar Smith on right wearing hat. photo courtesy S. Martinson

Note glider swing in front of structure in first image (top left) is the same swing shown in photo here.

The last image (Oscar Smith wearing hat) was most likely taken just upstream from Smith Place, judging from the height of the bank on the opposite side of the river. The large pool there at the top of the gravel bar in front of Smith Place was a favorite fishing spot of my father's.

(all images used with permission S. Martinson 03/14)

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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mcarp
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PostMon Sep 29, 2014 5:56 pm 
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Chico wrote:
Home Sweet Home and Low Divide replacement shelters 2002

Extracted from a PDF at link

Never flown in due to a lawsuit.

Thanks to reststep's recent post in another thread http://www.nwhikers.net/forums/viewtopic.php?t=8013008  I was able to find additional photos of the replacement shelters that were built in town in 2002.

The online version of the Spring 2003 OPA Newsletter is missing pages 3 and 4, which is/are initial page(s) of the article ....... meaning the full newsletter likely contains additional images.

Italic text underneath each photo is a copy/paste of the newsletter caption.

"no photo credit in the newsletter <a href="http://www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v11n1.pdf" target="_blank">www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v11n1.pdf</a>"
"no photo credit in the newsletter www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v11n1.pdf"

"no photo credit in the newsletter <a href="http://www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v11n1.pdf" target="_blank">www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v11n1.pdf</a>"
"no photo credit in the newsletter www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v11n1.pdf"

"[i:c30e71dfdd]Paul Gleeson, Cultural Resource chief, and park carpenter Jim Wesley with the 'historic' prefabricated shelters. OPA, PEER, and Wilderness Watch assert that these new structures do not belong in Olympic Wilderness. Photograph by Seabury Blair, Jr.[/i:c30e71dfdd] <a href="http://www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v12n2.pdf" target="_blank">www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v12n2.pdf</a>"
"Paul Gleeson, Cultural Resource chief, and park carpenter Jim Wesley with the 'historic' prefabricated shelters. OPA, PEER, and Wilderness Watch assert that these new structures do not belong in Olympic Wilderness. Photograph by Seabury Blair, Jr. www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v12n2.pdf"

"[i:c30e71dfdd]Home Sweet Home flower-carpeted meadow, site of proposed shelter installation in Olympic National Park Wilderness. A judge ruled it would directly contradict the mandate to preserve wilderness character. Photo by Tim McNulty.[/i:c30e71dfdd] <a href="http://www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v13n3.pdf" target="_blank">www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v13n3.pdf</a>"
"Home Sweet Home flower-carpeted meadow, site of proposed shelter installation in Olympic National Park Wilderness. A judge ruled it would directly contradict the mandate to preserve wilderness character. Photo by Tim McNulty. www.olympicparkassociates.org/PDF/opa-news-v13n3.pdf"


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PostTue Sep 30, 2014 12:24 am 
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Spruce Bottom Shelter - Queets Valley

Spruce Bottom Shelter - Queets Valley - 1953 - photo John Dewitt Kirk Jr.
Spruce Bottom Shelter - Queets Valley - 1953 - photo John Dewitt Kirk Jr.

Spruce Bottom Shelter was originally constructed in 1928 at a cost of $196.00.
It was destroyed in 1976. Cause was attributed to "accidental visitor fire" (Kaune 1976; Olympic National Park 1981)

I have some vivid childhood memories of my family’s annual trip into the Olympics and the Spruce Bottom Shelter.

The Spruce Bottom Shelter was located five miles from the trailhead on the north (west) bank of the river, about fifteen feet south of a pair of enormous Sitka Spruce, which grow from a common point. There is a saddle between the two trees (where they join) about four or five feet off the ground. The site where the shelter stood is now covered with snowberry about four to five feet tall. The original site of the shelter was about 200 feet south of the present day “Spruce Bottom Camp,” a well- established hardened campsite that is located just off the trail and is surrounded by a small circle of large spruce.

There was a rock fire ring in front of the shelter. There were bunks in the shelter, built of split spruce. Overnight visitors peeled the moss off the surrounding maples to serve as padding under their sleeping bags, which we usually found infested with mice and vermin – the primary reason my mother Ellida hated Spruce Bottom Shelter.

My mother said there was a privy behind the shelter as well, although I do not remember it. She packed a glass bottle of Lysol up there to wash the privy.

I caught my first trout in front of Spruce Bottom Shelter in 1958, using a single egg and a 7-foot bamboo fly rod. My little sister Lise’ and I would construct small stone pens near the water’s edge so we could keep the tiny trout we caught as pets. My father made us turn them loose. (Kirk 2014a)

Bob Creek Shelter - Queets Valley

Front corner elevation of Bob Creek Shelter. A can and an identifying sign hang in front of shelter. NPS photo, courtesy of Russ Dalton (RDA.002.023)
Front corner elevation of Bob Creek Shelter. A can and an identifying sign hang in front of shelter. NPS photo, courtesy of Russ Dalton (RDA.002.023)
Bob Creek Shelter - Queets Valley - July 1953 - photo courtesy Russ Dalton - NPS photo
Bob Creek Shelter - Queets Valley - July 1953 - photo courtesy Russ Dalton - NPS photo

additional images of Bob Creek Shelter:
Bob Creek Shelter - by Lyle Cowles

Tshletshy Creek Shelter - Queets Valley

Tshletshy Creek Shelter - Queets Valley - June 1953 - photo courtesy Russ Dalton - NPS photo
Tshletshy Creek Shelter - Queets Valley - June 1953 - photo courtesy Russ Dalton - NPS photo

Pelton Creek Shelter - Queets Valley

Pelton Creek Shelter 1999 NPS Image (OLYM18381-066)
Pelton Creek Shelter 1999 NPS Image (OLYM18381-066)
Man reading by the fire on a snowy day at the Pelton Creek Shelter on the Queets River. NPS image. Courtesy Henry Bonham. (BON.001.019)
Man reading by the fire on a snowy day at the Pelton Creek Shelter on the Queets River. NPS image. Courtesy Henry Bonham. (BON.001.019)

additional images of Pelton Creek Shelter:

Pelton Creek Shelter - by Bruce

Pelton Creek Shelter - 2002 - by Ski - * also Spruce Bottom Shelter 1953 *

Pelton Creek Shelter - 2008 - by GoBlueHiker

Pelton Creek Shelter - August 2013 - by Gay Hunter, NPS

Kloochman Rock Lookout - Queets Valley

Originally constructed in 1934 by Wilbur and Louise Northup during their honeymoon after they were married September 29, 1934.
Wilbur used a jackhammer to flatten the top of the rock, at an elevation of 3356 feet, the highest point along Queets Ridge west of Pelton Peak.
The structure was torn down in 1957 because it had deteriorated. (Kelty 1995)
Kloochman straddles the NPS/NFS boundary, but the lookout was in ONF.
Today all that remains at Kloochman is a steel framed helicopter pad (Kirk 2014b)

Kloochman Rock Lookout - Queets Valley - photo courtesy Mary Ann Shaube Lujan - NPS photo
Kloochman Rock Lookout - Queets Valley - photo courtesy Mary Ann Shaube Lujan - NPS photo

(all images courtesy NPS)

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostTue Sep 30, 2014 12:33 am 
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Rod: compare the Lyle Cowles image of the Bob Creek Shelter with the two above- note difference in roof - or are my eyes playing tricks on me?

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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RodF
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PostTue Sep 30, 2014 3:38 pm 
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Ski wrote:
Rod: compare the Lyle Cowles image of the Bob Creek Shelter with the two above- note difference in roof.

Quite right!  Bob Creek Shelter had clearly been re-roofed in Russ Dalton's photo, with the rear stringers extended above the peak to create an overhang.  And the hitch rail was added.  But Lyle Cowle's photo is definitely of the same shelter - note the details in the overlap of the shake siding courses on the right side wall are identical, as is the signboard on the left post.

Funds were very limited in postwar years until the "Mission 66" program began in 1957.  But still, the Park managed to reopen most of its trail system (largely abandoned during WWII), build some new trails (O'Neil Pass), and maintain many of its ~80 trail shelters.  Difference is that then, over half the Park budget went into maintaining the 95% of the Park that is backcountry.  Today, that fraction is 6 to 8%, and might fall further under the Wilderness Stewardship Plan?  Making Olympic even more of a frontcountry park to serve automobile tourists and study Wilderness without visiting it, and less of a trail park as its 1938 founding policy promised.

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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PostTue Sep 30, 2014 6:07 pm 
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same/same. sign on left. note maples in background.

* previous post ammended

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostSat Nov 01, 2014 12:18 pm 
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George Anderson barn - Queets Valley 102514 - photo courtesy Jim Hoare
George Anderson barn - Queets Valley 102514 - photo courtesy Jim Hoare

Of all the structures that once existed in the Queets Valley, only the barn at the George Anderson homestead remains standing.

(photo courtesy Jim Hoare - used with permission)

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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elderbob
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PostThu Mar 12, 2015 9:41 am 
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I have posted some new photos of Dose Meadows shelter and Kenneth Brown from around 1947.  Supplied by Burnett (his son)

http://www.windsox.us/VISITOR/history_shelters.html#WS2

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PostTue Apr 21, 2015 11:22 am 
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Victoria Heemstra graciously provided this image of Andrews Barn in the Queets Valley, taken in the mid-late 1980s.

A portion of the southwest corner of the structure was still standing in 1988, but the remains were flattened by an NPS trail crew sometime between 1988 and 1991.

Currently all that can be seen of the structure is the southeast corner of the foundation wall - a portion of which peeks out from under a small sitka spruce.

Andrews Barn - Queets Valley - mid-late-1980s - photo courtesy V. Heemstra
Andrews Barn - Queets Valley - mid-late-1980s - photo courtesy V. Heemstra

(see additional photos of Andrews Barn here )

(note: somewhere buried in a box I have a photo of a former girlfriend taken at the southwest corner of the barn in July 1988, at which time there was still yet something which resembled "structure". apparently NPS staff deemed it a hazard - people were using the wood to build fires - and an NPS trail crew knocked down the remains sometime between 1988-1991. both J. Wray and I attempted to confirm actual date without success.)

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Joe
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PostTue Jun 02, 2015 9:45 am 
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May 2015

15 mile shelter
15 mile shelter
Hyak Shelter
Hyak Shelter
remains of 21 mile shelter
remains of 21 mile shelter

July 2014

Happy Four shelter
Happy Four shelter
glacier meadow shelter
glacier meadow shelter
Olympic Guard station
Olympic Guard station
elk lake shelter
elk lake shelter

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