Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Where was 1880's Skagit Pass?
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mike
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mike
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PostWed Dec 28, 2005 8:01 pm 
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The wagon road turns and goes into Horseshoe Basin rather than continue over the Pass.  Perhaps wagons did go over the pass but there is no sign of anything remotely like a road.
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Jake
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PostThu Dec 29, 2005 4:34 pm 
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That was my point for sure Mike. A road as we know it didn't cross the pass. You are correct in saying it turned off and climbed into Horseshoe Basin. A trail did continue on from that cutoff and crossed Cascade Pass.
Some could and did call this a road. Whether a wagon ever made the entire crossing of the Cascades over Cascade Pass is open to discussion.
For many, many years the miners cried for a road into this remote part of the state, but the first real road and only road to this date that crosses the Cascades in Washington north of Stevens Pass was completed in 1972. That is highway 20, the North Cascades Highway.
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Timber Cruiser
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PostWed Jan 04, 2006 10:34 pm 
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Quark wrote:
This revelation of yours and the photo beats just about any cool thing I can think of; it certainly makes changing-color Silly Putty seem downright useless and frivolous.

wow!

suuure.gif I wish I was more entertaining than Silly Putty.  My daughters groan when I start to tell them about places I hiked or worked in the mountains.

Big_Hike_6-26_31
Big_Hike_6-26_31

I'm going to have to add to my Topo collection to research this hike.  Mine don't go this far North.  This was the start of the hike my grandparents (on the left) made that included the stop at the miner's cabin.  There's a sign on the pole behind them that says "...Ranger Sta".  But I haven't figured out where that is yet.

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"Logging encourages the maintenance of foilage by providing economic alternatives to development."
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Newt
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Newt
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PostSun Jan 15, 2006 6:48 am 
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Here's an interesting site. It may or may not have been posted as the info contained may or may not have been posted.

Tho this doesn't locate the Skagit Pass, it does mention it was also known as Ward's pass.

And another mention .

Here's some more local history about the Sauk and Monte Cristo areas .

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It's pretty safe to say that if we take all of man kinds accumulated knowledge, we still don't know everything. So, I hope you understand why I don't believe you know everything. But then again, maybe you do.
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hikermike
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PostMon Jan 30, 2006 9:33 pm 
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One of the routes over Cascade Pass was by way of Twisp Pass.  Remember, there was a "town" Gilbert at the head of Twisp valley and so a natural supply point other than canoeing up L. Chelan.  Wistful thinking trying to get the legislature to build a road over Cascade Pass led to maps carrying the term Cascade Pass road on the map even though that section was really only an Indian trail and no wagons crossed it.  Several times money was found to build a road and a few miles would be built by this party or that but it always led to the project being abandoned.  A steamship was built for L. Chelan which then brought in miners who built a road up the Stehekin to their mines.  Original plans did include Twisp pass in them as the continuation of the Cascade route.
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Sawyer
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Sawyer
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PostMon Jan 30, 2006 10:09 pm 
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According to "Exploring Washington" by Harry Majors:

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The history of HARTS PASS (6,198 ft., closed in winter) dates back to July 1872 when Tilton Sheets of the Northern Pacific Railraod ascends the Skagit River to "Skagit Pass". On July 19, about twelve miles from the pass, he meets his fellow surveyor Ward who had been examining the Methow Valley.

The next visit to Harts Pass occurs in January 1877 when A. M. McGee journeys from the Methow River "to the summit, from the southeast, by an easy grade." This pass commemorates W. Thomas Hart, who in 1894-95 built a trail, and about 1900-1902 builts a narrow-gauge wagon road, across Harts Pass to the Bonita Mine.
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Snowbrushy
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PostTue Jan 31, 2006 6:37 pm 
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WOW. Some very interesting stuff that's been brought up here. And from all I've read here it seem's to ask even another unanswered question: Where was Ward's Pass?

I had originally became interested about Cascade Mountain history after reading Fred Beckey's book's. I think that he has great footnote's and I often read them more that I do the actual climb's.

There are other unsung hero's in the quest to solve the mysteries of the Cascades. Daryl, et al, of NorthWest Underground Exploration's book's have picked-up where Fred left off. Along with other's and new up and coming Cascade history writer's.

I love the history of the Cascades because of these writer's. But, as we can see, the complete history hasn't been discovered. I wonder where these passes were. Did Twisp Pass play a part in history? Ward's Pass? Park Creek Pass? And where the hell was Skagit Pass?

With the internet perhap's we'll soon find out the answer's to such question's. Maybe tonight in Kansas somebody is reading this and remember's a great grandfather talking about Ward's Pass. And he will find the key that reveal's the secret's ...

I know that this summer I'm going to go do some exploring and try to find Skagit Pass - If one of you great people here dosen't find it first while hiking, or on the internet. This internet connection about Cascade Mountain history is a very important thing, I believe. And maybe someday Fred and Daryl, etc. will also chime in here to share their knowledge.

Thank You Tom and your co-hort (forget...) for bringing us this wonderful tool. (And Happy Birthday!)

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Oh Pilot of the storm who leaves no trace Like thoughts inside a dream Heed the path that led me to that place Yellow desert stream.
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Slugman
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Slugman
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PostTue Jan 31, 2006 7:09 pm 
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Snowbrushy, you post some interesting things. But man, do you need to read this threadlol.gif  wink.gif

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mgd
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PostTue Jan 31, 2006 7:09 pm 
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I've been reading Lake Chelan in the 1890's by Robert Byrd.  In footnote 16, page 65, he mentions the original Indian pronunciation of Twisp was Twitsp, which meant "yellow-jacket."

This NPS link has a reference to Twisp Pass.

Quote:
At the junction of the Methow and Twisp Rivers the party embarked on the second leg of their assignment, which would return them to Marblemount via Cascade Pass. Following the Methow River to the confluence of the "Twitsp" River, the men pushed on, crossing the latter to the north side and proceeding along an established trail. After crossing Twisp Pass the party dropped down to the confluence of Bridge Creek and the Stehekin River.


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Hark how the sailor's cry
Joyously echoes nigh
Santa Lucia, Santa Lucia
!!
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Snowbrushy
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PostTue Jan 31, 2006 7:28 pm 
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Hi Slugman,  I'll cool-it with my apostrophe's etc. I guess. I'm not sure what the rules are anymore.   smile.gif
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Snowbrushy
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PostTue Jan 31, 2006 7:30 pm 
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I'm not trying to be a sh##ty writer it comes naturally.
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Slugman
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Slugman
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PostTue Jan 31, 2006 10:46 pm 
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You are a very fine writer. That's what makes the apostrophe thing funny. Apparently most aspects for writing do come naturally to you, but that one thing doesn't. Just remember one thing and you'll be fine: no apostrophe when making something plural. Ownership yes, contractions yes. Plurals no. (OK, three things.  lol.gif ) Armed with just that knowledge, your mistakes will be few (but not quite zero due to a few exceptions that probably aren't worth remembering).

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Just another tequila sunrise....
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Allison
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Allison
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PostTue Jan 31, 2006 10:53 pm 
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Sometime's you's dont need to add apostophe's.
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Newt
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Newt
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PostWed Feb 01, 2006 5:47 pm 
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Twisp Pass. But no trails. frown.gif

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It's pretty safe to say that if we take all of man kinds accumulated knowledge, we still don't know everything. So, I hope you understand why I don't believe you know everything. But then again, maybe you do.
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Sawyer
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Sawyer
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PostWed Feb 01, 2006 9:24 pm 
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Man, I wish the history threads weren't cluttered up with noise like the rest of this site! Some of you should try the "X" delete button on your posts!

Anyway, more info from Discovering Washington, that should answer Snowbrushy's questions. I'm checking in from Kansas...

Wards Pass:

Quote:
WARD PASS (about 5,700 ft.) commemorates a Northern Pacific Railroad surveyor who examined the Little Wenatchee and North Fork Skykomish rivers in 1872.  {map shows it at head of those two rivers, on county line, S of Kodak Pk and N of Cady Ridge}

Quote:
During 1872, Northern Pacific Railroad surveyor Ward examined the Little Wenatchee and Skykomish valleys. He probably discovered WENATCHEE PASS (about 4220 ft.), which he called "Chusalle Pass". Ward completely missed Stevens Pass. {shown on map just E of Fortune Mtn}

Skagit Pass is mentioned in my previous note.

No details about Twisp Pass.

Park Creek Pass:

Quote:
Massive MOUNT LOGAN (9,087 ft.) received its first ascent in 1926 by surveyor Lage Wernstedt of the Forest Service. The peak takes its name from miner George Logan, who had a cabin on the northwest side of Park Creek Pass between 1896 and 1916. He subsisted on beans, bacon, and bisquits. He would spend each summer working here while during the winter he lived at Sedro Wooley earning enough money to support himself for the following summer.
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Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Where was 1880's Skagit Pass?
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