Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Where was 1880's Skagit Pass?
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Snowbrushy
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Snowbrushy
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PostMon Feb 13, 2006 7:29 pm 
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No you are because you like to waste your time for rich people .. No wonder it's hard to find volunteers to stick around.
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Quark
Niece of Alvy Moore



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Quark
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PostMon Feb 13, 2006 9:20 pm 
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This is way off subject.  You do realize this thread is in the history section, and 1880's Skagit Pass, don't you?

But still; try to look at Beaver Lake trailwork from another angle:

WTA is there to give the expertise in teaching the community to build their trail and care for it.  They're learning how the trails are built, and hence also how o care for their trails and keep soil from eroding into and destroying the wetlands there.  Without expertise by an organization specializing in such a thing, the City would have to spend lots of dollars hiring engineers and consultants, organizing a work party, purchasing equipment, additional insurance, advertising, paying employees overtime for weekends for two years or more, making mistake after mistake, and tapping out their resources, frustrating their volunteers and perhaps destroying their wetlands in the process.

Those precious dollars can be saved to, for instance, build a center to help boost the self-esteem of people who blew their chances of success and have developed an unnatural jealousy of inanimate objects belonging to other people.  Or maybe a center for disabled children for the indigent peoples of Seattle.

Too, since many people who volunteer for WTA are there, it frees up Sammamish residents to volunteer in other capacities if they wish to do so.  Take a center for autistic children.  Lots of volunteer work to be done there.  But I'm not interested in that kind of thing.  But say someone in Sammamish wants to volunteer for the little kiddies, and so does.  Wow, what a benefit to the community - not only Sammaish, but region-wide.

The City of Sammamish trail isn't just for Sammamish residents.  It's for anyone who wishes to use it.

Being selfish and closing yourself up hardens the ooze of kindness and spirit.  Folks helping folks don't stop at a city limit.  It oozes out all over.

You know that old adage;  what goes 'round comes 'round.

WTA may very well receive lots of donations from Sammamish residents.  That Sammamish money in turn is plunked down to restore Snowbrushy's fave Forest Service trail.  Unless they specifically say, "Don't work on anything for Snowbrushy."  But I doubt any of them say that.

Think about it.

[edit]  Any land agency hiring WTA to do work for them pays WTA to do work for them;  it's not free.  In winter, the Forest Service has no work for WTA.  County, DNR, cities, State Forest, whatever Mt Si is, and for a couple years, and whoever Rattlesnake Mtn belongs to (I could be wrong on that funding though) - all these are available to fund winter work whereas the Forest Service & NPS aren't.

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"...Other than that, the post was more or less accurate."

Bernardo, NW Hikers' Bureau Chief of Reporting
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touron
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PostMon Feb 13, 2006 10:05 pm 
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It is highly possible that if Skagit Pass had received a modicum of maintenance over the many years, it would not now be the title of this thread.  hihi.gif

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Touron is a nougat of Arabic origin made with almonds and honey or sugar, without which it would just not be Christmas in Spain.
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Allison
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Allison
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PostMon Feb 13, 2006 11:48 pm 
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hijacked.gif

before Touron's post!!

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Blake
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PostWed Mar 08, 2006 12:48 pm 
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Timber Cruiser wrote:
Looking through Park Creek Pass from miner's cabin.  June 30,1931
Looking through Park Creek Pass from miner's cabin.  June 30,1931

I was going to do some research on Park Creek Pass this winter to put together some retracement hikes next year.  This shot was from a 65 mile hike my grandparents did in '31.  They must have spent the night in the cabin because on the back of the photo they made a reference to the "packrat incident".



Tom,
My first attempt at using Flickr, so I hope I got the file size right.


That doesn't even actually look like Park Creek Pass to me, but it is small and I might be mis-remembering. PCP has Logan on one side, Buckner on the the other, and grassy meadows on both sides, just below teh actually high point of the pass. Anyone else think that this might NOT be PCP?
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mike
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PostWed Mar 08, 2006 1:56 pm 
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I'm assuming the cabin is in the Thunder Ck drainage? The meadows are on the Park Ck side, i.e. not visible in the picture. Trail switchbacks over to the left of the picture and approaches the pass angling up from left to right, no?
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salish
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salish
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PostWed Mar 08, 2006 5:03 pm 
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touron wrote:
It is highly possible that if Skagit Pass had received a modicum of maintenance over the many years, it would not now be the title of this thread.  hihi.gif

This is somewhat ironic, I ran into an old guy at my gym last night who built a (the?) trail from the Stehekin area to Cascade Pass, back in the 1960s. He and his friend(s) were contractors for the USFS for this project. He said the worst part was from the west side TH to about two miles. He said the vine maple was so bad they would use a 1/4 stick of dynamite every 4 to 6 feet to blow a path through it.  I need to ask him some more about this.

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My short-term memory is not as sharp as it used to be.
Also, my short-term memory's not as sharp as it used to be.
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RayD
the griz ate my pass



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RayD
the griz ate my pass
PostWed Mar 08, 2006 7:41 pm 
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He said the worst part was from the west side TH to about two miles. He said the vine maple was so bad they would use a 1/4 stick of dynamite every 4 to 6 feet to blow a path through it.

Holy bushwack, Batman! Why didn't I think of that? And I kin leave the fishing pole behind as well. hihi.gif
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salish
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PostWed Mar 08, 2006 8:36 pm 
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[quote= And I kin leave the fishing pole behind as well. hihi.gif[/quote]

that's right, a Dupont Spinner.

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My short-term memory is not as sharp as it used to be.
Also, my short-term memory's not as sharp as it used to be.
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Quark
Niece of Alvy Moore



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Quark
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PostThu Mar 09, 2006 8:48 am 
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salish wrote:
He said the vine maple was so bad they would use a 1/4 stick of dynamite every 4 to 6 feet to blow a path through it.  .

No doubt!  Vine maple is tough to cut out, it's so dense.  Time-consuming!  When we cut out a short stretch of it on the Ssquire Creek trail near 3 0'clock Rock, we discovered the old trail buried under the thick maple vines waaay uphill, about 5 feet above the current one.  So when we had finished cutting it, we were looking the old tread straight in the eye.

Vine maple renders hand saws useless after about 3 hours.  I can see where a blast would be better.

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"...Other than that, the post was more or less accurate."

Bernardo, NW Hikers' Bureau Chief of Reporting
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Riverside Laker
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PostThu Mar 09, 2006 11:13 am 
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Why are the saws useless? Is it because there are so many branches in the way? Or does it jam up the saw?
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Quark
Niece of Alvy Moore



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Quark
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PostThu Mar 09, 2006 11:45 am 
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The massive amount of sawing required to remove lots of vine maple eventually bend and break off teeth.  Of course some saws last longer, but one little bent tooth on a saw can wreak havoc, and it's easier to just toss it and grab a new one.  The vine maple themselves are easy to saw; it's that the trunks can go back 20 0r 30 feet, and they're twisted amongst each other back in there.  You have to track which cut affects which branch so you can pull it out of the jack-straw, one 30-40 foot trunk at a time.  If you just stay back in there and cut a bunch of trunks, then you have a massive table of loose trees and intertwined, like a giant birds nest.  Removing that is sorta like taking a beaver dam apart.   Well, I'm imagining it is.  I have never taken a beaver dam apart, at least not that I can recall.

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"...Other than that, the post was more or less accurate."

Bernardo, NW Hikers' Bureau Chief of Reporting
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salish
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PostThu Mar 09, 2006 3:36 pm 
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Quark wrote:
When we cut out a short stretch of it on the Ssquire Creek trail near 3 0'clock Rock, we discovered the old trail buried under the thick maple vines waaay uphill, about 5 feet above the current one.  So when we had finished cutting it, we were looking the old tread straight in the eye.

We've all done battle with vine maple, but a couple of years ago I fished on off trail lake in the Tonga Ridge area that had such thick vine maple I had to crawl across it's "canopy" for maybe a hundred yards before I hit dirt. My feet never once touched the ground. I was even considering trying to design "vine maple snowshoes"- some type of foot/boot aparatus that would allow you to walk on top of the canopy like a bird to get where you're going. Nast stuff.

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My short-term memory is not as sharp as it used to be.
Also, my short-term memory's not as sharp as it used to be.
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Snowbrushy
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PostSun May 21, 2006 6:24 am 
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http://www.nps.gov/noca/focus/focus2.htm

At the bottom of the above page is a mention of "Old Wagon". A old wagon trail around Bridge Creek. Maybe there was a wagon trail along the shore of Lake Chelan before the level of the lake was raised. And it continued up and over a pass into the Skagit drainage. I wonder which pass. Rainy?
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Newt
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PostSun May 21, 2006 10:54 am 
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Here's a crop from a 1922 state highway map that uses the name. It also shows up on earlier maps but is not named as such.


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It's pretty safe to say that if we take all of man kinds accumulated knowledge, we still don't know everything. So, I hope you understand why I don't believe you know everything. But then again, maybe you do.
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