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Snowbrushy
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PostSun May 21, 2006 9:21 pm 
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FANTASTIC. Thanks for the great map.   up.gif
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Snowbrushy
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PostMon May 22, 2006 6:00 pm 
Where is Parker Creek Pass?
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Newt wrote:
Twisp Pass. But no trails. frown.gif

Maybe Park Creek Pass was the Skagit Pass - Parker Cr. Pass. (names change)
Maybe it was Rainy Pass - afterall,  The name "Rainy Pass" still is on the highway signs and on road maps. I've alway's wondered about Rainy Pass. Have you ever wondered why Rainy Pass is there when Washington Pass is the Pass that goes up and over to Early Winters Creek?
The PCT goes thru Rainy Pass from the South but continues up into the hills. It's not a pass. But Rainy Pass gently comes up from the Stehekin Drainage and then goes down into the Skagit drainage. I think that either Rainy Pass or Parkers Pass was a wagon Road to the Skagit.

Skagit Pass of the 1870's/1880's was a place where people like you and me took off with a couple of mules and a small wagon in search of Gold Baby!  Loaded with a heavy wall tent, gun's, dynamite, grub, and lot's of prospecting tools. It was a time probably before Custers Last Stand.

Maybe you would have come across the Oregon Trail as a kid and you and your dad took off for Skagit Pass looking for the gold. First you'd have to go through Twisp Pass/South Pass/ War Creek Pass to get down to Lake Chelan.
And then you'd travel west with your wagon and have to go up and over another pass.

It wasn't Cascade Pass from the east side. No way. Was it Rainy Pass, or Parkers Creek Pass?
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Newt
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PostMon May 22, 2006 6:39 pm 
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I just get a thumb Snowbrushy. Iffin you don't have a larger, let me know.

--------------
It's pretty safe to say that if we take all of man kinds accumulated knowledge, we still don't know everything. So, I hope you understand why I don't believe you know everything. But then again, maybe you do.
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Snowbrushy
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PostMon May 22, 2006 7:31 pm 
MAP
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I thought you had the big pic.. And thank You Sir.
My comp. skills won't put the big one up but EVERYONE can find it on your previous post.

edit: fixed by admin
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Snowbrushy
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PostWed May 24, 2006 5:02 am 
Twisp the Beginning of the Road
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http://www.ghosttownsusa.com/twisp.htm
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Snowbrushy
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PostThu May 25, 2006 7:28 pm 
Getting There
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http://www.ghosttownsusa.com/bttales36.htm
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Blake
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PostMon Jan 21, 2008 3:34 pm 
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Snowbrushy wrote:


I've alway's wondered about Rainy Pass. Have you ever wondered why Rainy Pass is there when Washington Pass is the Pass that goes up and over to Early Winters Creek?
The PCT goes thru Rainy Pass from the South but continues up into the hills. It's not a pass.

Based upon the commonly accepted definition off mountain pass as a low point providing access between drainages, Rainy Pass is accurately named.

Rainy Pass divides Eastern and Western Washington. On the west, water will flow to the pacific via the Skagit system.  On the east, water will flow out to the Columbia River via Lake Chelan and the high desert.


Washington Pass divides two Eastern Washington Drainages.... Bridge Creek and Early Winters Creek.
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Schroder
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PostSun Jan 27, 2008 8:47 am 
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Northern Pacific Railroad was searching for a route over "Skagit Pass". Bancroft described Skagit Pass in the location of Ross Pass, between Sulphur Creek and Spruce/Agnes Creeks.
"Between the Fraser and the Columbia are the Skagit Pass, in Latitude 48d 15', the river of that name having cut through the range to the edge of the plateau opposite Fuca Strait, and opposite the upper Columbia and Bitter Root rivers, the latter being on the Northern Pacific Railroad Company's route through Mullan Pass..." (The Works of Hubert Howe Bancroft; Vol 27:History of the Northwest Coast, p.644)
This is the same route that D.C. Linsley explored in 1870 and is described here in his exploration of the Skagit River system for the railroad.
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PostTue Jan 29, 2008 11:02 am 
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To contradict my previous post, this seems to confirm that Park Creek Pass was indeed Skagit Pass by the reference to Bridge Creek:
From the New York Times, Sept. 30, 1901, p.7:
NEWS OF THE RAILROADS. PRESIDENT J.J. HILL S PLANS
Last Trip West to Inspect Route for a Washington Line. NEW WHATCOM, Washington, Sept. 20. -It has developed here that the last of President J. J. Hill of the Great Northern to the Pacific Coast was made to inspect a route for his second line of railway across the Cascade Mountains in this State. It is said Mr. Hill made the trip on from the head waters of the Lake Chelan country to Bridge Creek, in the Cascade Mountains. On the eastern side of the mountains the Great Northern is extending the system westward from Marcus to Midway. On the western side its line was taken forty miles eastward, from Hamilton to Rockport. Between Rockport, the present terminus of the line on the western side of the mountains, to Midway, where contracts are said to have already been let for construction on the eastern side, is a distance of 150 miles. It was to look over the intervening gap, in which lies Skagit Pass, that Mr. Hill made his last trip.
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Snowbrushy
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PostTue Mar 27, 2012 11:35 am 
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Schroder wrote:
To contradict my previous post, this seems to confirm that Park Creek Pass was indeed Skagit Pass by the reference to Bridge Creek:

This Wiki. about Cascade Pass says that it was the Skagit Pass.
"Cascade Pass (formerly also known as Skagit Pass is a 5,392-foot (1,643 m) mountain pass over the northern Cascade Range, east of Marblemount, Washington, U.S. Among the first white men to explore and map the Skagit Pass was New York newspaperman Frank Wilkeson."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascade_Pass

Cascade_pass
Cascade_pass

"Col. Wilkeson has long been a familiar figure about Lake Chelan. He came here first about thirty years ago at the head of a Northern Pacific surveying crew when that road was looking for a route through the Cascades. Having been impressed with the beauty of the lake country he returned here eight or ten years later, when the mining industry had its first boom in the Stehekin Cascades and conducted a miners' supply store at Bridge creek."
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Schroder
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PostTue Mar 27, 2012 4:50 pm 
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Yes, I've read several accounts in the last couple of years that refer to Cascade Pass as Skagit Pass
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