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Klapton
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PostWed Mar 26, 2008 10:58 am 
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It does indeed seem that with Cabin 1 being gone, there is little left from the original resort -- except the spring itself, of course!  As for what might be "restored"...  It would take a mighty deep wallet to build anything as magnificent as the original lodge there.  But it seems to me that that it would be possible to build some structures on the property that would be less likely to wash away.

I'm not sure if this linkie will work, but here's Snohomish County's parcel mapper of the property.  You might need to zoom in a bit, and you can turn on the aerial photo setting.  You can make out the open are where the cabins were.  Snohomish County Parcel Mapper

I think it would be possible to build something in the NE corner of the property.  It seems like the least likely spot to get washed away (my very novice opinon, of course -- and we all know the river will do what it wants without asking us!)

It would be nice if the spring itself could be landscaped a bit to make it a nice place for hikers to sit and rest, and a covered "information board" be set up with pictures and history of the place.

I wonder if a non-profit organization could be formed...  Something like what folks do in Monte Cristo.  A small care-taker cabin could be built in the NE corner, and volunteers could take turns at being caretaker for a week at a time...  Volunteer work parties could be set up to build new cabins (farther from the river this time!) as funds and hands are available.
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Tika
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PostSat Mar 29, 2008 9:05 am 
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Hi , new to this post:
My parents used to take us on hikes throughout the Cascade Range and I remember Garland - have photo somewhere - from around 1958. By the late 60's it had been abandoned and fell into the hands of some free spirits who tried to make a go it and failed. Last I went by there around 1990 it looked pretty run down with "no trespassing" signs posted.
Also, when I was in Italy in the early 70's I stayed with an aunt outside of Torino and she showed me an old postcard dated pre-WWII that my grandfather had sent her from Garland.
My father (first generation American) told me one of the reasons his father loved the NW was because it reminded him of his years hiking in the Italian Alps; the "backyard" of his ancestral village in Piedmonte.
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Polly
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PostSat Jul 05, 2008 4:05 pm 
I worked at Garland Mineral Springs
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Just to fill in a few details no one else seems to have covered on Garland Mineral Springs. I worked a variety of seasons as a housekeeper, waitress, and cook's helper in the mid to late '50's under then owner Cameron A. Sharpe. The gravel road in from Index was 13.7 mi. There were four mineral springs. They all lay papallel to the main road and just to the left of the entrance. No. 1 and largest was orange-olivegreen in color and had a strong sulfurous/multi-mineral odor and salty-mineral taste. It was piped under the entrance road into the LARGE swimming pools (small one closest to coffee shop windows was about 3 feet deep and for kids. The big one was graduated.

Spring #2 was very similar to #1 and the one visitors sampled. No. 3 was soda water, and #4 was carbonated, had been reclaimed, was wood-lined and we used a dipper for the makings of carbonated beverages or floats for the coffee shop. On summer time-offs we picked wild huckleberries, made pies, and sold as a favorite in the shop.

We accommodated drop-ins and overnight guests for various stays. Only the second floor bedrooms had sinks in the rooms; one had a large claw-footed bathtub for guests demanding a mineral water soak.

The electricity generated by the fast-descending small stream across the main road before reaching the entrance was DC, required converters, and was only available until 10 p.m. as I recall. Electric appliances were small, like irons for clothes. All linens were transported out for laundering.

The fire that took the lodge occurred, I am quite sure, in Jan. 1960. Cause: wood furnace explosion. They retrieved just a few items.
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rejoicing1
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PostSat Jul 05, 2008 4:14 pm 
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wow Polly...
What insight you add to the history of Garland!
As you described the springs, I could almost close my eyes and " smell and see the springs"....although I was only there one summer in the early 50's....it was a memory that will always be etched in my mind. Medora, Cam's wife, was my sister in law Betty's , sister.
You were probably " housekeeping" the summer we came for a visit! ....
Joyce

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Snowbrushy
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PostSun Jul 06, 2008 12:25 pm 
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Thanks Polly.   up.gif
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Zipper
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PostTue Jul 29, 2008 5:04 pm 
Facts About Garland
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Hi All,

I had some questions about the history of Garland so I emailed Cam Sharpe.  He emailed me back with some interesting information that I thought the group would be interested.  I got his permission to post it here.  Following is his reply:  We had a substantial low pressure boiler to provide steam heat and hot water for the lodge.  It was about 7' long and about 5' wide.  We burned up to 1 cord of wood daily during the coldest part of the winter.  We cut dead trees from our land and were allowed dead firewood from U.S.F.S. land (you probably remember that).  When cutting alder or deciduous trees, we would fell them in winter with the sap down so they would be dry.  The sap would already have receded in the larger evergreen trees that were no longer living.

The daily cutting, splitting and carrying wood in the winter months was quite a project, mostly in a drizzle and sometimes in snow.

In the evening, we would bank the wood and it would provide heat through most of the night.  Early in the morning, we would use some cardboard to generate a lot of heat and fast start-up for the main fire.  This would produce steam heat in about 10-15 minutes.  At one time, we learned how to place wet wood on top of a strong fire.  The water would generate hydrogen and oxygen, with a hot blue flame.  After the fire consumed the hydrogen and oxygen from the water, the dry wood would then burn in a normal manner.  This extended the burn-time by some additional measure, possibly an extra hour.

A few days prior to the January 1961 fire, Mr. Sharpe had removed the protective screen from the top, and had cleaned the chimney.  The screen was scheduled for re-installation that coming Saturday, as Mr. Sharpe was busy working on a local construction project to supplement our meager income.

The weather was clear, and there had been no snow for several days. The cedar shake roof was tinder dry.  At mid day, the lodge was getting pretty cool, so Mrs. Sharpe put some cardboard in the boiler to generate some quick heat and allow the wood to get going.  She was unaware that the screen had not been replaced.  Some glowing embers escaped and ignited the roof.  The driver of a passing logging truck stopped to advise that the roof was on fire and assist with evacuation.

Firefighting hoses were frozen, and water pressure was generally inadequate to reach the roof at that time of the year.  A few records were saved, but not much else.  All occupants escaped unharmed.  You are correct that the fire was caused by burning cardboard embers reaching the dry cedar shake roof.  The lodge was fully involved witching minutes.  As the shell burned away, the extremely robust structure inside was revealed.  It had been an extremely stout building, with massive timbers throughout.

I arrived home late from school that night to find no lodge; only an eerie glow as the burning embers illuminated the still-standing chimney.  The family moved into round cabin #1.  I slept in the loft.  We replaced our clothes from Goodwill while the American Legion in Everett donated $200 to help us to get some dishes and cooking utensils. Many friends, relatives and strangers donated clothing, furniture and food.

The 1,000 year high flood of 1959 and the lodge burning in 61, spelled the beginning of the end for Garland as we knew it.  The lodge had given Garland a special character that no longer exists.  In subsequent years, fisheries and Forest Service regulations became increasingly difficult and prevented us from keeping the river under control.

After the 1,000 year high in 1959, the river began braiding back and forth, taking mature old growth trees out on one side, then the other.  Each year, 10 to 20 % of the salmon eggs are stranded, which appears to be a significant contributor to declining stocks.  I am told that 4 or 5 of the major salmon spawning streams in the N.W. are suffering severe loss of eggs as a result of braiding.  Not all N.W. rivers are similarly effected.  Recent discussions with Fisheries indicated that there will probably be several years of study, followed by state and federal funding for a multi-million dollar restoration project to keep a consistent salmon spawning ground.

It appears that some official don't like rip rap on banks, and gabions are not often allowed as the fish fins can become trapped in them.  Fisheries does like what they call "fish friendly" banks made from logs and stumps that provide shelter for the fish.

The section of the N. Fork of the Skykomish River that runs through Garland contains hundreds of thousands of board feet of this log debris piled up in the braids throughout the channel.  Dragging them to the banks and tying them in with cables would provide dirt cheap, fish friendly embankments that would do three things. First, it would provide a stable channel for the salmon to hatch.  Second, it would stop the braiding.  Third, it would protect the valuable mineral springs that are being decimated by the flooding.

The 1,000 year high water was determined by the presence of several remaining stumps near the river that are older than that.  I also did a brief survey of the Garland property with an internationally-known hydrologist, discussing the braiding and flood issues.  He advised that the topsoil depth showed at least 600 years of buildup prior to the 1959 flood.  He further found that the riverbed level at the upper end of the Garland area has been raised at least 4' as a result of the braiding and slower velocity caused by the river spreading.  This is contributing rapidly to the destruction of the world class mineral springs.

In recent years, about 10 acres of the prime Garland land has been lost to the braiding.  The river has now taken out the lodge foundation, the 100' swimming pool, the picturesque cabin #1 and is now filling in all of the mineral springs.  Are the mineral springs valuable ?

Recent discoveries by two Arizona State University scientists have found that mineral water and mineral mud from deep springs like Garland have some chemical combination that kills MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus).  MRSA is a devastating problem invading hospitals around the world. We had known for some time that the Garland Mineral Mud had some spectacular healing qualities, but did not know why.  The 25-million gallons of mineral water produced annually, just might be of some benefit to society........  If we can save it.

Well, so much for today's history lesson.  Fred: You were there and saw all of this first hand.  It was quite a neat place.  Looks like God has other plans for it now.  Although Garland was very special, God lets us serve wherever we are.  The place is not as important as what we do.  See ya.

Cameron Sharpe
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Klapton
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Klapton
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PostThu Jul 31, 2008 10:28 am 
Re: Facts About Garland
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Zipper wrote:
The 1,000 year high flood of 1959 and the lodge burning in 61, spelled the beginning of the end for Garland as we knew it.  The lodge had given Garland a special character that no longer exists.  In subsequent years, fisheries and Forest Service regulations became increasingly difficult and prevented us from keeping the river under control.

After the 1,000 year high in 1959, the river began braiding back and forth, taking mature old growth trees out on one side, then the other.  Each year, 10 to 20 % of the salmon eggs are stranded, which appears to be a significant contributor to declining stocks.  I am told that 4 or 5 of the major salmon spawning streams in the N.W. are suffering severe loss of eggs as a result of braiding.  Not all N.W. rivers are similarly effected.  Recent discussions with Fisheries indicated that there will probably be several years of study, followed by state and federal funding for a multi-million dollar restoration project to keep a consistent salmon spawning ground.

It appears that some official don't like rip rap on banks, and gabions are not often allowed as the fish fins can become trapped in them.  Fisheries does like what they call "fish friendly" banks made from logs and stumps that provide shelter for the fish.

The section of the N. Fork of the Skykomish River that runs through Garland contains hundreds of thousands of board feet of this log debris piled up in the braids throughout the channel.  Dragging them to the banks and tying them in with cables would provide dirt cheap, fish friendly embankments that would do three things. First, it would provide a stable channel for the salmon to hatch.  Second, it would stop the braiding.  Third, it would protect the valuable mineral springs that are being decimated by the flooding.

It's a shame that government regulation and bureaucracy are keeping anyone from preventing such losses.  I wonder what the fines / penalties would be for simply doing it anyway, without Big Brother's permission?

Quote:

The 1,000 year high water was determined by the presence of several remaining stumps near the river that are older than that.  I also did a brief survey of the Garland property with an internationally-known hydrologist, discussing the braiding and flood issues.  He advised that the topsoil depth showed at least 600 years of buildup prior to the 1959 flood.  He further found that the riverbed level at the upper end of the Garland area has been raised at least 4' as a result of the braiding and slower velocity caused by the river spreading.  This is contributing rapidly to the destruction of the world class mineral springs.

In recent years, about 10 acres of the prime Garland land has been lost to the braiding.  The river has now taken out the lodge foundation, the 100' swimming pool, the picturesque cabin #1 and is now filling in all of the mineral springs.  Are the mineral springs valuable ?

I wonder how much / what portions of the property are above that 1,000 year flood level (if any)?  If so, it could be possible to build a home or caretaker's residence there.  Small butt-and-pass log cabins could be built to withstand flooding on other parts of the property, as long as the river isn't likely to migrate there (or one could get away with putting some controls on it).  If they are built 14' x 14' without kitchens or bathrooms, they could even be built without permits.  Each one could have a small solar panel - battery setup to support some lighting (put the battery in a lockbox up in the loft to be floodproof).  Build a simple bathouse in a flood-free spot.

This would make for a wonderful base camp for hikers / campers headed into Wild Sky.  If I could afford to buy it and build it, I would offer use of the cabins for free, and accept donations from people who wanted to give something for their use / upkeep.  I would make an offer based on what I get from selling my current home next year, but I suspect the amount would be far less than the real value of such an amazing property.

/sigh...

It wouldn't be nearly as amazing as the old days.  But it would be a place for future generations to enjoy the beauty of nature and build memories to pass along.
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GeoHiker
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PostTue Feb 24, 2009 11:52 pm 
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Here's an update on what's happening at Garland from a couple days ago.  It doesn't look like anyone has been in there since the big floods of several years ago that took out the river cabins.  Everything looked to be trashed in total abandonment.  Shame this is such a cool area with so much fascinating history.

Washed out road and exit spring.
Washed out road and exit spring.
Garland Mineral Springs
Garland Mineral Springs
Garland Mineral Springs
Garland Mineral Springs
Old bathhouse.
Old bathhouse.
What's left of the river cabins.
What's left of the river cabins.
Garland Resort Cabins
Garland Resort Cabins
Garland Minerals
Garland Minerals
Garland Mineral Springs 2/09
Garland Mineral Springs 2/09
Garland Springs
Garland Springs
N Frk Sky River
N Frk Sky River

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You call some place paradise, kiss it goodbye......Eagles
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Zipper
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Zipper
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PostWed Feb 25, 2009 8:56 am 
Reply to Garland Update
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Geohiker, thanks for the update.  So sad, but great pictures.  frown.gif  I noticed you got a picture of part of the foundation of the pool or lodge.  The last flood must have uncovered it.  When I was there in 2003, I didn't see any foundations.  Is it possible to drive into Garland by taking the upper road at San Juan Campground and then coming in from the north (Jack Pass road)?  How did you get in to take the pictures?  Isn't the road out in places coming out of Index?
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tigermn
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PostWed Feb 25, 2009 9:54 am 
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Yea I was also curious, how far were you able to drive/how far did you have to walk to get back there?

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GeoHiker
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PostWed Feb 25, 2009 1:53 pm 
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Yes, the road is washed out coming in from the Index side and the estimated repairs are still 2-3 years out.  You can reach that area coming over Jacks Pass on the Beckler River Rd, FS 65.  That road just opened on Friday after being plowed out by the state, so you can drive to the closed gate about 1/4 mile from Garland.  The road is in excellent shape.   up.gif

With the lowering of snow levels I wouldn't expect there to be too much attention on keeping the Beckler plowed out until the state gets a break, so the good road window may have been short lived.

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You call some place paradise, kiss it goodbye......Eagles
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AR
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PostWed Feb 25, 2009 9:46 pm 
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Wow, great walk through time that Garland was.   up.gif
Moving forward it would seem to me the more simple the better.  Getting the powers that be to shore up the river(as mentioned).  Getting a volunteer force to remove the old shacks and remains that should be cleaned up.  Cleaning and securing the mineral springs with natural pathways and rock surroundings of the springs.
A volunteer crew could keep the area in good shape with one or two visits a year (barring our every few year-thousand year flood).

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...wait...are we just going to hang here or go hiking?
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peltoms
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PostSat Feb 28, 2009 5:32 am 
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Definitely a place worth saving.  What is the water temperature?
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Zipper
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PostSat Feb 28, 2009 8:14 am 
Temperature of Springs
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The temperature of the Springs are a consistent 68 degrees Fahrenheit year around.  Of course, the 3rd spring (soda) is colder. The 3rd spring being drinking water cold.  The carbonated spring (#4) is up the road  , a short walk.  It was covered over by a landslide in the late 50's  However, with GPS and man's new marvels, it could be located and uncovered for use again. It was good mixed with Kool-Aid

With the river running rampant through the property, water slides could be installed without too much money and it could become Garland Mineral Springs Northwest Water Park.:0tongue.gif
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Zipper
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PostTue Mar 03, 2009 11:10 am 
Garland Flood of 1959
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I emailed Jon Sharpe and was remembering incidents during the Garland Flood of 1959.  I thought the group might be interested in those memories.  The memories follow:

Thanks Jon.  You're not off the "hot seat" yet.  There will be more questions later.  We need to get together and pick each others' memories of the Garland years.  The years have gone by....50+ now.  Some details become fuzzy and in some cases forgotten.  I was there less than 2 years in total.  You, Janis, Barbie, and Ray were there pretty much the whole time.  You have many, many memories that must not be lost.  Cammie , sorry, I still think of him as that name, wasn't there the entire time, but probably has more memories in the aspects of the ones that have gone on.  He has memories of a more technical nature, I believe.  Jon, you were 9 at the time of the flood.  You must have vivid memories of that night and the clean-up later.  I remember that we did a lot of praying as the flood roared all around us and as we heard the sounds of animals crying as they were swept down the torrents.  I remember hearing logs and debris hitting the lodge.  I remember an old man being trapped in the laundry room because the flood waters had risen so fast, in the basement, that the doors could not be opened.  We broke the window in the door and pulled him through to safety,  We all then scampered up the basement steps, into the coffee shop,. with the flood waters at our heels.  I remember opening and breaking the chain on the window, at the top of the stairs, to give the flood waters a path out.  The water stopped about 6 inches from the ceiling of the basement.  I remember your dad walking the pool fence, to get to the road, to turn the DC power off ,coming from the generator plant on Troublesome Mountain.  I remember us walking the property prior to the flood and all seemed to be OK, but as we stood near the basement stairs, we looked northeast as a wall of water headed our way.  We scurried down the stairs and up the stairs to the coffee shop....stopping to rescue the old man.  I remember that cabins 24 and 25 were knocked from their foundations and washed 50 or 100 feet toward the lodge.  I remember that there was a family living in 1109.  I can't remember their name.  How about a little help....anyone remember their name? (NOTE: Cammie remembered.  Their names were Holters)  They weren't affected, except for being without power when Mr. Sharpe turned it off.  They also were not able to  get to the lodge until the water receded.  As I remember, the flood lasted all night and most of the next day.  It may have lasted longer.  Any help?  I also remember that like a week later, we had the river hit us again.  It waited just long enough for us all  to pitch in and clean the mud out of the basement.....a wheelbarrow load at a time.  I remember placing boards over the basement stairs making a ramp.  We tied a rope onto the wheelbarrow.  We would tug on the rope, while James Woolsey piloted the wheelbarrow.  He was a wirery type of guy.  Perfect for the job.  I remember Mr. Sharpe walking out to get us help.  He was really a tough guy!  No wonder he lived to be the ripe old age he attained (92).  I also remember finding our cat on top of the furnace.  He had managed to hold his head above the water.  He survived. I know this is all in one paragraph.  I guess I got carried away with my memories of the flood.

BTW does anyone remember the names of the teachers at Index in 1954-55?  What ever happened to the Biggerstaffs?  I remember that they lived in Sultan.  How about the old guy, that lived in Index, and smoked the cigar?  Does anyone remember the Carters (Winkle)?

I'm going to CC Cammie, Janis,and Ray.

Enuf 4 now,

FRED
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