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PNW4Life
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PostTue Mar 31, 2009 4:17 pm 
Garland Mineral Springs
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Although people have many fond memories of Garland, I believe they need to remember that it is still private property and that trespassing is not prohibited.  You would not appreciate it if people wandered all over your property would you?  Please obtain proper approval before visiting Garland's grounds.  There are reasons "Private Property" signs have been posted and as well as there is a reason that a gate is guarding the entrance.
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DebS
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PostWed Apr 22, 2009 11:26 am 
Researching Garland
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Hello,
I'm a University of Washington student working with a group on a  primary research project for Snohomish County. We're going to be studying the Garland Mineral Springs/Starr Hot Springs history, and I found this topic.

My group is hoping we'll be able to get some first hand information from you  about the history of the site.  I'll be sending PMs to folks on this thread, but also wanted to invite you to contact me, if you would like to participate by sharing what you know.

Thanks in advance!
Deb
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Zipper
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PostFri Apr 24, 2009 8:59 am 
Starr Hot Springs
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I recently received an article from Cameron Sharpe and he gave me permission to share it with the group.  The article deals with the beginnings of the springs before it was renamed Garland.  Here is that article:

The Story of My Infirmity and the Permanent Cure by the use of the Waters of the Starr Hot Springs, near Index, Washington.
Carrie Starr Weismann.

In the year 1870, I was living in the State of New York, and became afflicted with a swelling of my right knee.  I was taken to Watertown, New York, to Dr. Spencer, at that time a noted surgeon. Dr. Spencer said it was tubercular, and there was nothing to do but to have the leg amputated.

I did not want to submit to such an operation, so went to consult another doctor, a Dr. Brown.  At first he seemed to help me. I had to walk on crutches at that time about 18-months, and could not seem to recover full use of my leg.  In the year 1884, I went to Omaha to consult with Dr. Lee, who was one of the surgeons who was called to Buffalo, N.Y. to work on President McKinley when he was shot.  Dr. Lee told me that the outcome sooner or later must, in his opinion, be an amputation.

In 1887 I married Dr. J.N. Starr or Chicago, and he took me to Dr. Murphy and Dr. Fonger in Chicago.  They both told Dr. Starr that that if he would take me to Puget Sound on the West Coast, where there was no frost, a complete change of air, water and food could be had, that I might improve.  We came to Snohomish in the year 1888 in August.  But, the change did not seem to improve my condition, and Dr. Starr had about decided to take me back to Chicago.

In a conversation with an Englishman one day, who had come in from the woods near the place now called Index, Washington, the Englishman told the doctor about the wonderful springs in the valley of the North Fork of the Skykomish River.  He related that the springs were so charged with gas that a bottle would not hold the water.  He also said he had been in Baden Baden, Germany, and he thought the water of these springs were much better than the water at Baden Baden.

Dr. Starr then found a guide, took a pack train and started for these springs.  This was in the year 1889, in the month of March. After locating the springs and staying there a few days, building cabins and preparing to take me in, Dr. Starr returned to Snohomish and told me he had found the spring and a cure for my knee.  (Note: Age 37).  In May 1889, he made preparations to take me to the springs.  I went on horseback, as there was nothing from Sultan to the spring but a mountain trail, and a very poor one at that.

The first night, we stopped in Sultan at Mr. Inman’s and the next stop was at or near Index at the Englishman’s.  I found  his wife a very charming woman.  I could not go farther on account of my knee being so painful.  In our party with others, we had brought a maid.  Dr. Starr left me and the maid at the Englishman’s and he, with the rest of the party went on to the spring with the pack train.  In a few days, I was able to travel the rest of the way to the springs, and on reaching the springs and not finding the comforts of life, I was not so well pleased, and I decided that I would not bathe in the water.  But, as time went on, and my knee got much worse, I finally decided to bathe in the water.  I took two baths every day for three weeks.  At the end of the three weeks, I had no swelling in my knee at all, but was still very weak.  It was then August, and time for me to go back to Snohomish, so I returned with the pack train.

In the Summer of 1890, Dr. Starr had things much more comfortable at the springs, and I went there and stayed a good share of the Summer.  I enjoyed my stay there very much.  I bathed in the springs a great deal, and was greatly improved.  I soon was fully recovered from my infirmity, and the Doctor proceeded immediately to secure title to the lands on which is located these wonderful springs.  We secured the grant, which was signed by Grover Cleveland as President of the United States in May 1896, and have owned it ever since.

Since that time, I have never felt anything of the lame knee, and now at the age of 84 years, I am exceptionally well, weighing a little less than 200 pounds and enjoying extremely my home at Wilber, Washington, with my present husband, Mr. Weismann, Dr. Starr, having died some years ago.  While I am still able to do so, I am glad to tell of my complete cure at what is now known as the Starr Hot Springs that others who may hereafter be afflicted in some way may also be able to receive their cure in the same way.
Carrie Starr Weismann
March 6, 1928 In the 1930s, the springs were renamed Garland Mineral Springs

That's the end of the story!   -Fred (Zipper)
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trellboy
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PostMon Jul 13, 2009 8:24 pm 
permission to visit Garland
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I'm planning a hiking trip with a friend through the North Fork Skykomish valley. Can someone help me with info on who to ask for permission to visit Garland Mineral Springs?
Thanks!
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SkyDeb
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PostWed Mar 03, 2010 7:54 pm 
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I just read this entire thread, and I am hoping all of you have posted are still around. Is there any new news on Garland? Has any one visited up there recently? Are there still people trying to live there? Has it been sold or is it still up for sale? Does anyone know who to call for permission now? I lived down the road from Garland over 30 years ago, and without a doubt, it was the most important learning time of my life. Living in such pristeen surroundings made me who I am today. I sure would like to see this thread picked up again.
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trestle
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PostMon Mar 22, 2010 9:37 am 
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Thanks to all for a stroll through time.  up.gif
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heartingalena
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PostSat May 22, 2010 10:25 pm 
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I have enjoyed reading the posts that have been made over the last couple of years.

The flood that washed out the Index Galena Rd from the Index side has kept me from visiting the area.  There is just something special about that area.  When you need to get away from the world for an hour or 2 that is where I would go.

Reading the posts about the memories of the Galena Mineral Springs is better than watching TV!  The reason being that these are real people who have experienced the imprint of other people in their lives.  People connecting with people.

We cannot recreate this place with structures but maybe the spot can be preserved so that connections between people can still happen here.

I haven't ventured from the Beckler River side a/c I am usually in the area by myself.  Maybe this summer we will have time for my husband and I to take an adventure and see the sites from that direction!  I sure miss the area.
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troublesomemountain
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PostThu Aug 12, 2010 5:06 am 
A 2010 Trip To Garland
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First of all, I have to say that this has been by far one of the most interesting threads I have ever had the good fortune to stumble across online. In fact, I joined this forum specifically to respond to this thread. This look back into the history of this place and this area is amazing, especially since I'd never heard of it until this weekend.

See, this weekend, I was charged with throwing a dear friend a bachelor party. And since our group of friends doesn't exactly consist of the typical bachelor party types, we decided to explore the forest service roads extending off Highway 2.

We took Beckler Road about 9 miles up, before taking another FS road east and finding a good spot to camp for the night. And then we all fell in love with the area. We started poring over the map we had taken and found Garland Mineral Springs. We wanted to check it out, but didn't have time on this trip.

After coming back down the mountain, I did some research, found this thread, and decided to return in about a month to see if anything is still there. We will be taking Beckler Road again, as we learned the Index-Galena Road is still washed out as of Summer 2010, and will attempt to find Garland the back way. According to three separate maps we've researched, and the info provided by all the users in this thread, it should get us there without a problem.

Provided we can actually get onto the property, we plan on looking around and taking some pictures, which I now plan on sharing here. Any word on the status of who owns this place as of 2010? We certainly don't want to intrude, but all of us are really fascinated by this place's history. Not sure what the draw is for us, but we are all intrigued.

If anyone has any info, tips, or ideas for going up there, I'd love to hear them. And for those of you curious as to its current condition, I'll post when we return about how it looks these days, and post any pictures I can.

Thanks again to Cliff and Fred, and all the other people who contributed to this thread. The stories about this place are a great read. Even if we can't actually make it there for some reason, it's great to know about this part of the Cascades' history.

Matt
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Zipper
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PostSat Nov 27, 2010 2:25 am 
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It has been sometime since I've visited this thread.  It is heartening to see that people are still interested in the history of Garland and continue to keep the thread alive.

In answer to the inquiries about Garland's ownership, it is still owned by the Shape and Mooney families.  They don't mind people visiting the property.  Just be respectful and leave it the way you found it.  If you would like to contact Cameron Sharpe, his email address is SharpeC@Cox.net.

Here is a little more history of Garland supplied by Cameron:

Garland:

Discovered by native American Indians who observed that animals drank the mineral water and rubbed injuries in the mineral mud.  When the natives rubbed the mineral mud on injured body parts, they found very rapid healing.   During the mid 1930s, Dr. Starr and his associates filed mineral claims and built the Garland Mineral Springs resort.  Lumber for construction was obtained from the property, and substantial cribbing was installed along critical river bank areas. 



Construction included: Gravel road (probably from Galena area to Garland), 3-story lodge with basement  (4,000 s.f. per floor w/ food service facilities and 22 guest rooms), permanent development of 5-mineral springs (two of which provide 25-million gallons of high quality mineral water annually), 40 x 100 mineral water swimming pool, bath house with soaking tubs, 21 guest cabins, hydroelectric power, camping, horse, and recreation facilities.  During WWII, the site was taken over by the U.S. Army as a secret training base.  After WWII it was purchased by Real Estate investor Ralph Taylor of Wenatchee, WA.  The distance, travel times, and



In 1953, the site was purchased by Rev. Cameron Sharpe, his wife Medora, and her sister Laura Mae Mooney, widow of the late U.S.A.F Capt. Raymond Mooney. The Sharpe and Mooney  families, (with the help of several dedicated assistants, including the Seifert family), operated the site as conference center and camp for youth. None of the previous operations, nor the conference/youth camp were economically viable. 



In  November 1959, a 1,000 year high flood flushed huge amounts of  debris from the upstream watershed, creating enormous log jams, and river diversions.  This began a catastrophic sequence of river “braiding,” where successive log jams divert the river to erode opposite banks, dropping hundreds of old growth trees into the river.  This creates more braiding, soil erosion, additional downstream braiding and pollution of the Puget Sound. In addition to the loss of thousands of old growth trees and soil. The Braiding continually disturbs fish spawning habitats as the river shifts back and forth each year, destroying more old growth trees, land, roads and bridges and silting the rivers and Sound.  Several rivers in Western Washington and Oregon were similarly effected during the 1959 floods, but not all watersheds. Some fisheries people feel that low intensity efforts with “engineered log jams,” might help the rivers maintain a more consistent course, preventing the loss of old growth forest and land while providing more stable “fish friendly” spawning grounds.



After the November 1959 flood, the Sharpe/Mooney families cleaned up the debris and re-opened.  In January 1961, a fire destroyed the historic lodge.  With the lodge gone, the facility became increasingly difficult to operate, and the families moved to the Sultan Valley, where they lived the remainder of their lives.  Rev. Sharpe assembled construction materials for several years, planning to rebuild, but vandalism, theft, and the lack of financial resources prevented further development.

                            Fred (Zipper)
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GeoHiker
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PostSat Nov 27, 2010 3:23 am 
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Fred, thank you for keeping this thread alive.  It's one of the more fascinating threads on NWH.  I enjoy hearing about the history of Garland and visit that area often to hike and camp.  Keep it alive!.... up.gif

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You call some place paradise, kiss it goodbye......Eagles
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Zipper
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PostSat Nov 27, 2010 6:54 am 
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GeoHiker, thank you for your kind words.  As I sit here thinking of my time at Garland, I remember, I must have been 13, I was introduced to Snipe hunting.  I think the others were all seasoned hunters, so I was chosen to wait in the woods with a gunny sack held open on the ground.  The others all left to supposedly chase the snipes into my direction and the open gunny sack.  I don't remember if they left me with a flashlight or not.  It was pitch-black and it was scary being out there all alone.  Anyways, after much time, they began to become concerned when I didn't return.  So, they decided they had better go see what had happened to me.  When they finally found me, I was obediently holding the gunny sack,  waiting for the snipes to appear.  I never did realize I had been duped until they finally told me the truth.  It was actually fun growing up at Garland.  We didn't have TV or radio.  We sometimes didn't even have a newspaper to read, but we were never bored.  There was always something to do!!
Fred (Zipper)
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lady camper
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PostMon Mar 21, 2011 10:03 am 
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My daddy used to take me trail riding in the hills back in the mid-70's (when I was a teenager). I remember seeing Garland Hot Springs yet for the life of me, I thought we accessed it via the Mountain Loop Highway through Monte Cristo. Back then, the road to Monte Cristo wasn't gated off at the Loop. Am I correct in thinking that it could be accessed via Monte Cristo? I also remember hippies living at Garland and they wanted NO ONE to come onto that property ie one biker type guy sat squarely out front with a shotgun in his lap and a glare on his face. Clearly they had 'something' to guard. That was the final time daddy ever took me trail riding out to Garland! Anyone else have similar memories?
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Schroder
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PostMon Mar 21, 2011 10:51 am 
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No, you couldn't access Garland from Monte Cristo.
What you describe sounds like Garland near the end of its days.
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Bronco
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PostTue Apr 12, 2011 5:02 pm 
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It's my recolection that Monte Cristo was initially accessed via Silver Creek from the Galena area.  Is it possible that this route was still accessible by horse in the 70's?  Does anyone know what the current status of this route is? Kind of an interesting question.
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Schroder
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PostTue Apr 12, 2011 5:24 pm 
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Look for Poodledog Pass and Mineral City threads. There are many of them.
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