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Mike Collins
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Mike Collins
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PostWed Jan 22, 2003 5:36 pm 
Faded Words Revisited
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Those of you who have hiked beyond Monte Cristo to Glacier Basin have passed a fir tree conspicuously cordoned off by a white picket fence. Within the fence, behind a piece of glass, lies a faded piece of paper which is totally illegible. On it were once written words eulogizing James E. Kyes.

James Kyes was born in Everett. He studied at the University of Washington but finished his education at the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, graduating in 1930. He served aboard the carriers Saratoga and Ranger before returning to Annapolis to continue courses in engineering. He was given command of of the destroyer USS Leary which was to patrol and convoy in the North Atlantic during WWII. It was there that Commander Kyes went to assist an aircraft carrier which had been attacked by German submarines. The Leary was hit by two torpedoes, broke in half, and foundered. He noticed his black messboy (that was the term at the time) did not have one. He removed his jacket and gave it to the messboy. James Kyes went down with his ship and the memorial was place honoring his courage. The tree was supposedly planted by James Kyes during his teenage years when he lived with his family in Monte Cristo. Kyes Peak was first summited by him and a group of other people.

A tin-can (destroyer), as he would have called it, was launched on Aug 4, 1945 and sponsored (the navy doesn't christen) by his widowed wife, Mrs. James E. Kyes. It received six battle stars for Korean service. It was decommisioned as a US vessel but sailed with the Taiwanese Navy as a guided missile destroyer at least until 1998.
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Karen
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Karen
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PostThu Jan 23, 2003 3:30 pm 
Kyes Memorial
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Mike,

I enjoyed reading about the Kyes Memorial -- I've also seen it many times over the years. However, I haven't been there for a while and am sorry to hear that the writing is no longer legible. Hmmm. There's another memorial (I think it's called Peabody Rock) up in that same region which is a little harder to find. It's near 76 Creek, upstream from the road through the townsite. I forget the story behind the rock but there is a story. I think it's written up in the Monte Cristo Guide (the one that's out of print) under 76 Basin.

Speaking of 76 Basin, has anyone been up there in recent years? We tried to go several years ago and dead-ended in brush. I know that Rubberlegs has been up there and I understand there is a cabin up there (a new one). It might be the one that I saw for sale.

Here's another photo of the Old Sunset Highway from an old postcard (photographer unknown).

Karen

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stay together, learn the flowers, go light - from Turtle Island, Gary Snyder




Sunset Highway two.JPG
Sunset Highway two.JPG
 Sunset Highway two.JPG (42 KB)
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Gordy Comer
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PostFri Jan 24, 2003 8:04 pm 
Peabody Rock
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Karen, you are correct that Peabody Rock is mentioned in the Harry Majors book.  "The historic trail parallels 76 creek, and soon reaches the slvan setting of Peabody Rock. This huge boulder marks the final resting place of Frank W. Peabody (1854-1930), who in August 1889 along with Joseph Pearsall staked some of the eariest mining claims in the Monte Cristo district. Buried beside him lies the body of his wife, Kittie A. Peabody (1857-1946). Some distance beyond is the site of the Lincohn Mine, marked by a tailings pile from which protrudes an ore-cart rail. The mine entrance has been covered up. "
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Gaius
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PostSun Jan 26, 2003 8:25 pm 
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A while back a person posted the census for the Monte Cristo mining areas during the mining hey-days. I noticed in the 1900 census that there is a large Japanese population in Monte Cristo. I always thought that the population was mainly made up of irish and northern europeans. I re-read the book "Monte Cristo" by Woodhouse looking for a description on the life of a Japanese immigrant in Monte Cristo with no luck. Is there a history book that describes the life of Japanese immigrants in the pacific northwest at the turn of the century? Any information would be helpful.

I do enjoy the Monte Cristo area because of the history. Personal writings and newspaper articles do make it come alive. One writing I thought about as I was hiking up to poodle-dog pass from Mineral City is a newspaper reporter describing miners taking supplies over poddle-dog pass from Mineral City (from Monte Cristo Area by Majors and McCollum): impassable to horses any time of year...big broad backed mountaineers do the packing, through sunshine and storm at 6 cents a pound. An average pack is 75 pounds...At the summit of Silver Lake pass we met a packer who was loading up with about 65 pounds of fresh beef for the supply camp. An equal amount, for which he had to return, was cached in a tree, and a sack of flour, which would necessitate another trip still, was placed on the dry side of a cedar to protect it from the rain till he could make a second trip...A lost dog, suggesting in his coat and general apperance the Eskimo was standing by, wagging his tail in anticipation of the treat in store for him, and when the remainder of the beef pack was lifted into the tree, he squatted below coolly to await the disapperance of the party down the mountain. He was not to be enticed or driven away...

A dollar a day for hauling stuff over the mountain probably wasn't too bad for the time. A beer at the local Monte Cristo establishment was maybe 2 to 3 cents
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Dogpatch
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Dogpatch
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PostMon Nov 17, 2003 2:19 pm 
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Karen wrote:
Found this old photo I took of Monte Cristo. You could still drive there then.


It's great, thanks. It's what I remember from when I was up there as a child--late 50's. Plus there was a little miner's shack with a ghost in the window. Very corny and cool.
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Mine Explorer
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PostFri Jun 09, 2017 10:40 am 
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James E. Kyes has carbide writings in a Monte mine..........epic stuff
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Jimbo
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PostMon Jun 12, 2017 9:04 am 
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Post that Pic..

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Guns only have two enemies; rust and politicians
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Mine Explorer
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PostMon Jun 12, 2017 1:17 pm 
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BA mine graffiti
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Jimbo
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PostThu Jun 15, 2017 6:44 am 
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Nice, not seen that mine.  Seen all the others but that one. POM is the most Bitchin there I think. 76 is well worth the walk to.

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Guns only have two enemies; rust and politicians
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Mine Explorer
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PostThu Jun 15, 2017 10:07 am 
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POM...nice...
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Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Monte Cristo around 1979
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