Forum Index > Trail Talk > Name That Plant
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
The Angry Hiker
SAR Blacklistee



Joined: 13 Jun 2008
Posts: 2890 | TRs
Location: Kentwila
The Angry Hiker
  Top

SAR Blacklistee
PostMon Jun 04, 2012 11:30 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Well, I don't have very many plant allergies, but just being in the vicinity of those things gets my eyes burning. They're blooming like crazy around the Green River right now. Someone went along and uprooted a ton of it and tossed it all on the ground. That seems a little pointless, unless they have a problem with mistaking it for parsnip and eating it.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Mike Collins
Member
Member


Joined: 18 Dec 2001
Posts: 2835 | TRs

Mike Collins
  Top

Member
PostMon Jun 04, 2012 12:17 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cow parsnip, poison hemlock, and water hemlock are all in the carrot family, Apiaceae. This family all have their white flowers on umbels (like umbrellas). Some of the members are edible and others like poison and water hemlock are deadly poisonous. Confusion between them has caused death before  http://journals.lww.com/transplantjournal/Abstract/2003/09150/Successful_transplantation_of_donor_organs_from_a.26.aspx and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1306130/pdf/westjmed00177-0043.pdf  Without education and scrutiny tragedies will happen again. I have seen patches of cow parsnips and poison hemlock growing together so someone who isn't paying attention to each plant would end up dead. Prompt emergency response can avoid the anticipated death by respiratory paralysis from poison hemlock. http://journals.lww.com/pec-online/Abstract/2009/11000/Poison_Hemlock_Induced_Respiratory_Failure_in_a.11.aspx

King County recommends eradication of poison hemlock but does not require it on their noxious weeds list; http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/animalsAndPlants/noxious-weeds/laws/non-designated.aspx
I do not know why King County has included the deadly poison hemlock on the same list as the ox-eye daisy but that is government for you.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
tigermn
Member
Member


Joined: 10 Jul 2007
Posts: 9248 | TRs
Location: There...
tigermn
  Top

Member
PostMon Jun 04, 2012 12:57 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Ok that just gives me another reason to remain a carnivore...  lol.gif

--------------
My flickr photo site.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
puzzlr
Mid Fork Rocks



Joined: 13 Feb 2007
Posts: 6840 | TRs
Location: Stuck in the middle
puzzlr
  Top

Mid Fork Rocks
PostSat Sep 26, 2015 1:08 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I've been doing some invasive weed picking at the Dingford trailhead, mostly for Herb Robert. But I'd like to also learn what native plants like to grow out into the open sunny area there. Here are three of them that I'd like help identifying. It will be easier next spring when they are flowering, but can anyone help now? I'm impatient.
Dingford trailhead plant
Dingford trailhead plant
Dingford trailhead plant
Dingford trailhead plant
Salmonberry at the Dingford trailhead
Salmonberry at the Dingford trailhead

--------------
Mid Fork Rocks flickr
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brockton
Member
Member


Joined: 02 Aug 2012
Posts: 242 | TRs
Location: West Seattle
Brockton
  Top

Member
PostSat Sep 26, 2015 1:32 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I don't know about the first one.  Kinnikinnick?

The second one looks like plantain from the look of the leaves and the flower/seed stalk.  I believe that's a non-native weed.

The third one is definitely not thimbleberry, which has simple palmate leaves, like a maple leaf.  It looks like it could be salmonberry, with the two lower leaflets making the shape of butterfly wings.  (That's something I heard about identifying salmonberry.)
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
hatchetation
Member
Member


Joined: 11 Jun 2017
Posts: 28 | TRs
Location: Seattle
hatchetation
  Top

Member
PostWed Oct 03, 2018 4:40 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Found these conifer-ish creeping vine things on the trail up to Pratt balcony. There was no woody stem like a young sapling. Just a vine coming out of the ground. Very soft. Weird habit - never seen anything like em.

My best guesses are probably terrible - polytrichum? Cryptomeria japonica?

Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Wastral
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Sep 2006
Posts: 199 | TRs

Wastral
  Top

Member
PostWed Oct 03, 2018 5:02 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
puzzlr wrote:
I've been doing some invasive weed picking at the Dingford trailhead, mostly for Herb Robert. But I'd like to also learn what native plants like to grow out into the open sunny area there. Here are three of them that I'd like help identifying. It will be easier next spring when they are flowering, but can anyone help now? I'm impatient.
Dingford trailhead plant
Dingford trailhead plant
Dingford trailhead plant
Dingford trailhead plant
Salmonberry at the Dingford trailhead
Salmonberry at the Dingford trailhead

1) Creeping Snowberry if fuzzy(can't see well enough), otherwise could be a compact form of Cranberry
2) Common Plantain
3) SalmonBerry

--------------
Slap Slap; 10 bugs dead, Blip Blop; Stumble Fall; Curse and Get up and Do it all Over Again; Reaching High For the Sky a Mile High; Topping Out Atop a Peak; Priceless
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Wastral
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Sep 2006
Posts: 199 | TRs

Wastral
  Top

Member
PostWed Oct 03, 2018 5:04 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
hatchetation wrote:
Found these conifer-ish creeping vine things on the trail up to Pratt balcony. There was no woody stem like a young sapling. Just a vine coming out of the ground. Very soft. Weird habit - never seen anything like em.

My best guesses are probably terrible - polytrichum? Cryptomeria japonica?


Pacific Yew is my bet where it has more sunlight than normal.  Can look different depending on how much light it gets.  If in VERY deep shade it will be VERY dark green leaved and very sprawling, open form.  If in more light, the new growth, then a much brighter green and compact form.

--------------
Slap Slap; 10 bugs dead, Blip Blop; Stumble Fall; Curse and Get up and Do it all Over Again; Reaching High For the Sky a Mile High; Topping Out Atop a Peak; Priceless
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 5552 | TRs

gb
  Top

Member
PostThu Oct 04, 2018 7:48 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
hatchetation wrote:
Found these conifer-ish creeping vine things on the trail up to Pratt balcony. There was no woody stem like a young sapling. Just a vine coming out of the ground. Very soft. Weird habit - never seen anything like em.

My best guesses are probably terrible - polytrichum? Cryptomeria japonica?


Lycopodium. A type of club moss. Match the species at the Burke WTU image collection. http://biology.burke.washington.edu/herbarium/imagecollection/browse.php?Genus=Lycopodium&Classification=Vascular%20Plants&BrowseBy=Genus&OrderBy=SciName&Display=Descriptions&BeginsWith=L
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
brewermd
Member
Member


Joined: 02 Jun 2008
Posts: 68 | TRs

brewermd
  Top

Member
PostThu Oct 04, 2018 9:15 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
There is an app called inaturalist that would help with these ids.  The way it works is that you take a picture and upload into inaturalist and it ids it from a large data bank of pictures that has been accumulating over several years. Works quite with plants and insects but lacks a little in mushrooms.  The North Cascades Park people promote the app during their bioblitz activities.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
robertjoy
Member
Member


Joined: 25 Sep 2011
Posts: 107 | TRs

robertjoy
  Top

Member
PostThu Oct 04, 2018 9:55 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
from your link:  conium maculatum.   google search shows foliage as VERY different from the leaf pattern in question.  commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Conium_maculatum_2.jpg

--------------
Mosquitoes refuse to bite me,
purely out of respect.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
hatchetation
Member
Member


Joined: 11 Jun 2017
Posts: 28 | TRs
Location: Seattle
hatchetation
  Top

Member
PostThu Oct 04, 2018 1:05 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb wrote:
hatchetation wrote:


Lycopodium. A type of club moss. Match the species at the Burke WTU image collection.

Ahhh! I think that's it. Lycopodium annotinum perhaps. Thanks! That Burke site is awesome, haven't seen it before. Lead to the pnwherbaria.org entry, with this specimen image.

Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb
Member
Member


Joined: 01 Jul 2010
Posts: 5552 | TRs

gb
  Top

Member
PostThu Oct 04, 2018 2:56 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
hatchetation wrote:
gb wrote:
hatchetation wrote:


Lycopodium. A type of club moss. Match the species at the Burke WTU image collection.

Ahhh! I think that's it. Lycopodium annotinum perhaps. Thanks! That Burke site is awesome, haven't seen it before. Lead to the pnwherbaria.org entry, with this specimen image.


That is it. I thought you might be better served by doing a bit of investigating on your own. Although most of the images show the club moss to be upright, I've mostly seen it prostrate.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Sculpin
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Apr 2015
Posts: 840 | TRs

Sculpin
  Top

Member
PostFri Oct 05, 2018 7:56 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
gb wrote:
Lycopodium. A type of club moss.

A very humble group of plants these days, it was not always so.  Wikipedia says:

"During the Carboniferous Period, tree-like Lycopodiophyta (such as Lepidodendron) formed huge forests that dominated the landscape."

They are among the most primitive of vascular plants and have continuously occupied the earth since the Silurian.  In my experience they are rather uncommon around here.

The Smithsonian has some very impressive Lycopod fossil tree trunks.

--------------
Between every two pines is a doorway to the new world. - John Muir
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
nordique
Member
Member


Joined: 04 May 2008
Posts: 1085 | TRs

nordique
  Top

Member
PostMon Oct 08, 2018 6:51 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Thank you, Sculpin!

MANY decades ago, my high school football team was named the Sculpins.  And 'Myoxocephalus octodecemspinosus' won me several college biology fieldtrip quizzes!
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
   All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Trail Talk > Name That Plant
  Happy Birthday mtnwkr, Gav088!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy