Forum Index > Trail Talk > Hiker Safety, tips, close calls, lessons learned
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
wiki summary
 
This wiki post can be edited by any member
Member





wiki summary
 
This wiki post can be edited by any member
PostWed Dec 13, 2006 1:21 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Any member can edit this post

What is the point of this post?


Wiki summmary last edited by ratherbhiking on Tue Jul 08, 2014 10:10 pm (this post can be edited by any member)
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Trailhead
PCT Class of 2012



Joined: 25 Jul 2007
Posts: 390 | TRs
Location: PDX
Trailhead
PCT Class of 2012
PostWed Jan 02, 2013 5:02 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
wolffie wrote:
Unrelated:  Oct. 2012, a PCT through-hiker lost the trail under snow, wandered into a deep ravine he couldn't get out of, spent 10 days  awaiting a rescue that never came, finally managed to extricate himself in desperation by backtracking.  He had neither map nor compass.

Oh no, your not going to rehash that again?  HYOH!

Bouncer
PCT hiker
Class of 2012
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
markh752
Snoozing on a rock!



Joined: 03 Dec 2011
Posts: 841 | TRs

markh752
Snoozing on a rock!
PostSat Jan 26, 2013 3:33 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
The Angry Hiker wrote:
Trekking poles are not appropriate EQ for glissading, folks.

I caught some a-holes glissading with trekking poles this summer!  huh.gif


moon.gif
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
The Angry Hiker
SAR Blacklistee



Joined: 13 Jun 2008
Posts: 2891 | TRs
Location: Kentwila
The Angry Hiker
SAR Blacklistee
PostMon Feb 25, 2013 10:24 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I wish I had taken a photo of that lady of no particular nationality tumbling down the glissade chute with her trekking poles flailing around.

We had just seen them coming down the scramble in a manner that was making some climbers in the vicinity cringe, so the odds were in favor of someone getting a helicopter ride down the mountain.  But luckily, no one was hurt.

"Crazy Tourists Of No Particular Nationality on Del Campo
"Crazy Tourists Of No Particular Nationality on Del Campo
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
limpyweta
Member
Member


Joined: 03 Apr 2010
Posts: 71 | TRs
Location: Seattle
limpyweta
Member
PostThu Mar 21, 2013 6:22 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
-unlike what I read in this thread, photographic tripods, from Costco to Manfrotto, will break if used as a walking stick, especially when river crossing

much more rare things, but important:

-Some game trails are more apparent than others, but there's some one shouldn't camp on.

-Some dogs eat Poison Hemlock, and some people, grown adults, eat Indian Hellebore, both can be lethal. Do not ever trust just a field guide of flora or fungi, if in doubt, report it. The Poison Control Center's resources are great.

--------------
http://islandboundmedia.ca/current/current-videos.htm

Alec, flickr.com/photos/limpyweta
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
coldrain108
Thundering Herd



Joined: 05 Aug 2010
Posts: 1291 | TRs
Location: somewhere over the rainbow
coldrain108
Thundering Herd
PostFri Apr 19, 2013 5:06 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
wolffie wrote:
I have seen a real live self-arrest done right in a deadly place:  eyeblink-fast, he landed pick-first and didn't slide an inch.  I think that's how it has to be.

I had to do this once.  I was expecting it so I was ready.  That is reallly the trick, expecting the slip to come...which we all should be if crossing hard steep snow - expecting the slip that is.  Its when you think it isn't going to happen that you let your guard down.

It was while hiking up to White Pass from Sloan Creek enroute to Glacier Peak(which we bagged).  The trail crosses several steep gullies and one was snow filled.  There was a tromp path across it but the snow was rock hard.  I put one foot on it and stopped immediately when I realized how hard it was and what the result would be if I slipped, I retreated and grabbed the axe out of my pack.  About halfway across, whooooops.  I landed immediately on the axe, pick first,  Stopped me w/o moving at all, just like it should.

My one and only real life saving arrest.  Used the axe other times like when glissading and going a bit too fast, but that is just a roll-over and stop procedure.

--------------
"The world will not be destroyed by those who do evil, but by those who watch and do nothing"  - Albert Einstein
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Tvashtar
Tvashtalker



Joined: 22 Aug 2005
Posts: 1227 | TRs
Location: The 11th Dimension
Tvashtar
Tvashtalker
PostFri Apr 26, 2013 7:05 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Trekking poles work fine for glissading in softer snow.  Hold them together as you would an ice axe to brake.   

You can also glissade tripod style on your feet by holding your poles together, leaning slightly on your trekking poles to control your speed and maintain stability.   

In the right spring corn conditions you can just ski on your boots.  Remove your pole leashes; if you go down, toss one pole and use the other to self arrest.

Self arresting with a ski pole

Or just purchase a Whippet. 

An ice axe is overkill and unnecessary weight on most hikes involving some snow travel.   Poles will do the job just fine.

--------------
"We are, all of us, in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars." - Oscar Wilde
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Stefan-K
Member
Member


Joined: 10 Aug 2009
Posts: 468 | TRs
Location: seattle
Stefan-K
Member
PostTue May 21, 2013 11:07 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
yep.

Poles are a great tool, but you got to know how to use them--and be prepared to use them correctly.

Slugman delineates how to use them properly for controlling a sitting glissade. Hold them the same way you would an ice axe: tip back, handle forward, tucked close, with one hand towards the middle of the pole as fulcrum and control for amount of pressure (drag/resistance) exerted on the snow.

For self arrest, as tvash points out, make sure you're not using your straps, because your hands will have to be prepared to drop to the bottom of your pole. Use two hands on one pole, using one hand to leverage pole upright or even angling towards the slope to maximize resistance and bite. Keep your pole as close to your body as you can to maximize weight transference, i.e. drag/resistance.

Mostly though, as pointed out, mental preparation is key to quick deployment.

Here's proof that it works:

Kendall ridge, W. side - 04.13.2013
Kendall ridge, W. side - 04.13.2013

slightly different conditions (slab, avi), but same principles as mentioned above in action.  You can see my ski tracks entering on the right hand side of the photo. I stopped under the rock not feeling good about conditions and contemplating the next move. Next move was decided for me as the snow gave out from under me. Without thinking too much about it my hands dropped and I dug in with my pole. Stopped myself within 5 ft.  You can see the drag mark in the snow lower right of center in the photo.


I also keep my poles in mind when in glacier situations, prepared to flip them horizontal should I happen to break through. Never had to use this one and hope I never do. smile.gif

I'm sure there's other uses for poles as well... as long as you keep it creative. don't succumb to dogma...
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Malachai Constant
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jan 2002
Posts: 13639 | TRs
Location: Back Again Like A Bad Penny
Malachai Constant
Member
PostTue May 21, 2013 2:53 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I also used two poles parallel held in two hands like a kayak paddle for sitting glissades  hockeygrin.gif

--------------
"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Critter
Woodland Creature



Joined: 25 Aug 2012
Posts: 1223 | TRs
Location: Hoodsport, WA
Critter
Woodland Creature
PostSat May 25, 2013 8:05 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
This was a close call.  I hope this video works and isn't huge.  It looks better in HD but it might lag.

--------------
www.critterstylebackpacking.net
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
wolffie
Member
Member


Joined: 14 Jul 2008
Posts: 2514 | TRs
Location: Seattle
wolffie
Member
PostWed Jun 26, 2013 5:18 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Put yourself in the position of the SAR people when your family first reports you missing, and how handy it will be if your safety contact has an email AND a hardcopy of your detailed plan, including everything they'll want to know, plus PLans B, C, & D.

--------------
Some people have better things to do with their lives than walking the dog.   Some don't.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Maverick02
Member
Member


Joined: 30 Oct 2013
Posts: 3 | TRs

Maverick02
Member
PostThu Oct 31, 2013 5:21 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
NWHikers,

I am a moderator from High Sierra Topix and spreading the word about
our New Search & Rescue HST Reconn Form which is named after Larry
Conn a member and friend of ours who died last year in the Sierra Nevada.
Hope you will use it and distribute it between fellow hikers so we can
possible save lives in the future.
http://highsierratopix.com/community/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=10192
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
hiker1
Member
Member


Joined: 29 Aug 2009
Posts: 1624 | TRs
Location: West Coast
hiker1
Member
PostWed Nov 06, 2013 1:06 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Vancouver man stabbed while hiking on Grouse Mountain

North Vancouver RCMP are seeking a suspect after a man was attacked while hiking on Grouse Mountain on Tuesday.

Police responded to a call after a 53-year-old Vancouver man was stabbed by an unknown assailant as the two men crossed paths about halfway up the B.C. Mountaineering Club Trail, which runs adjacent to the Grouse Grind trail.

------------------

Edit/Update Nov. 13

Grouse Mountain stabbing suspect arrested in North Vancouver


--------------
falling leaves / hide the path / so quietly
~John Bailey, "Autumn," a haiku year, 2001, as posted on oldgreypoet.com
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
wolffie
Member
Member


Joined: 14 Jul 2008
Posts: 2514 | TRs
Location: Seattle
wolffie
Member
PostThu Apr 03, 2014 3:35 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
ALCOHOL STOVE SAFETY
I just watched a nifty stove demo video
DANGEROUS FUEL HANDLING!  Open pouring from fuel bottle near a burning stove.  As lab safety officer, I would freak if I saw anybody doing that in the lab.  The unmarked flammable bottle is also a major safety violation -- you know what's in your fuel bottle, but it should be idiot-and-child-proofed; if there's ever a kid in your house, it will find your gear pantry.

Very nasty accident in Seattle Puclic Schools chemistry lab once -- 3rd degree burns -- teacher poured alcohol from a bottle into a watch glass in which the invisible flame was still burning.  POOF!!
It occurs to me that similar situations could occur with alcohol backpacking gear.  Alcohol flames can be INVISIBLE -- I've seen video of a  racetrack pit crewman on fire -- jumping around, aflame, no flame visible (alcohol-fueled turbine car?).
What I fear most is an unnoticed leak from a white gas stove, soaking the soil underneath, then POOF.
Boiling water is less glamorous but very dangerous -- leading hazard in academic labs -- I know of 2 nasty camping water burns requiring evacaution of children, one a helivac.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
hiker1
Member
Member


Joined: 29 Aug 2009
Posts: 1624 | TRs
Location: West Coast
hiker1
Member
PostThu Apr 03, 2014 9:03 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
wolffie wrote:
ALCOHOL STOVE SAFETY

Once when backpacking on Vermont's Long Trail, staying overnight at one of the nifty shelters, I was getting my old Svea stove ready to use. It was evening and there's little light in these cabins, so I lit one of the candles left there by other hikers.
I took off the stove's cap to put in more fuel, but couldn't see how much fuel was left in there, so brought over the candle to check it out. Just as I was getting the candle real close to the hole, it finally dawned on me that this might be a bad thing to do. So very slowly I moved the candle away from the stove and breathed a big sigh of relief. If I had not done this, I probably would not be around to write this post.

--------------
falling leaves / hide the path / so quietly
~John Bailey, "Autumn," a haiku year, 2001, as posted on oldgreypoet.com
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
like2thruhike
Member
Member


Joined: 28 May 2009
Posts: 1288 | TRs
Location: Seattle
like2thruhike
Member
PostSun Jul 13, 2014 10:42 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kahtoola microspikes and ice axe saved my beacon on ascending and descending steep snow free hard duff on Union Saturday. Crazy how solid that stuff can get and how boots just slide off it.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Trail Talk > Hiker Safety, tips, close calls, lessons learned
  Happy Birthday Dslayer!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy