Forum Index > Food & Grub > frying trout in the high country.
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
Malachai Constant
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jan 2002
Posts: 13931 | TRs
Location: Back Again Like A Bad Penny
Malachai Constant
  Top

Member
PostTue Sep 16, 2003 11:31 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
From BC parks:
Tips in Bear Country

Bears are found throughout B.C., frequently near streams. Black bears and grizzlies have a keen sense of smell, which may attract them to freshly-caught fish, fish guts, spawning grounds and bait such as fish eggs. Here are some simple precautions to help you avoid bear encounters and conflicts:


Clean your fish a good distance away from camp.
Dispose of fish guts by puncturing the bladder and dropping in deep or rushing water, well away from heavily used shoreline areas. Avoid disposal in shallow water or where likely to wash up on the beach, bank or boat launch. Burial or burning is not recommended, and please, do not place in garbage receptacles!
Remember not to wipe your hands on your clothing after cleaning fish or handling fish or bait such as fish eggs.
Bears can be drawn to many types of food - not only fish and bait, but also groceries or garbage. Take precautions both while fishing and at your camp. Keep fish eggs in well sealed and secure containers.
Make your presence known by talking loudly or making noise, particularly along streams and in areas where there is bear sign such as droppings, tracks, or claw or bite marks on trees.
While fishing, if a bear approaches within 50 metres (or 100 m for a female with cubs), reel in your line or cut the line and leave the area immediately
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
-lol-
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 771 | TRs

-lol-
  Top

Member
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 8:38 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Dslayer
Member
Member


Joined: 02 Jan 2002
Posts: 652 | TRs
Location: Home:  Selah  Work: Zillah
Dslayer
  Top

Member
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 10:04 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I'm a foil man myself-pretty easy to pack foil and whatever I'm cooking the fish with-oil/butter, lemon pepper, onions, lemon-whatever.

Along the line of the nutrient story-FWD is throwing dead, spawned out salmon into streams to make up for the fact that salmon, whose deaths used to supply large amounts of nutrients to the streams they died in, are no longer returning in great numbers to those streams.  One of the things that has occurred with this is the inncreased sightings of bald eagles along the Yakima R. basin.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
SeaNat
Member
Member


Joined: 03 Sep 2003
Posts: 63 | TRs
Location: West Seattle
SeaNat
  Top

Member
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 11:04 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
2drx wrote:" a respectful alpine angler will never discard them in lake shallows where they can be seen by others"

Sounds more like an aesthetic thing for you. One man's garbage is another trouts survival. Biologically, high mountain lakes are almost devoid of nutrients and I don't mind feeding the fish a little something as long as it's natural. Since most anglers here throw the guts into deeper or faster flowing waters there is no concern.  Trout are cannibalistic and love there own guts. I've used trout guts for bait and it works great. Just use common sense.
p.s. screw the WDFW! They've done nothing but but manage our fisheries into the toilet for the past 20 years. But that's another forum.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Tom
Admin



Joined: 15 Dec 2001
Posts: 15577 | TRs

Tom
  Top

Admin
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 11:13 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Actully, 2drx was quoting from the WDFW site.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Odonata
Member
Member


Joined: 14 Aug 2002
Posts: 306 | TRs
Location: Hopping to Hell
Odonata
  Top

Member
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 11:26 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
It's always a bit of a bummer to arrive at a camp site and find fish carcasses strewn about in the water. Yes, its happened many times. It's not cool with me to filter water around them. Besides the aesthetics. It is good to know 25 ft of water is OK. I'm sure it takes a while for them to return to the earth.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Backpacker Joe
NWH Joe-Bob



Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 22923 | TRs
Location: Cle Elum
Backpacker Joe
  Top

NWH Joe-Bob
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 11:33 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I just bring up my solar powered micro wave to cook them!




TB winksmile.gif  winksmile.gif  winksmile.gif  winksmile.gif  winksmile.gif  winksmile.gif

--------------
"If destruction be our lot we must ourselves be its author and finisher. As a nation of freemen we must live through all time or die by suicide."

— Abraham Lincoln
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brian Curtis
Trail Blazer/HiLaker



Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 1466 | TRs
Location: Silverdale, WA
Brian Curtis
  Top

Trail Blazer/HiLaker
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 12:05 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Seanat, the WDFW has managed high lakes extremely well over the last 20 years. They have had major problems in other areas, but since high lakes are the topic of this discussion I feel compelled to defend their track record in this area.

Not throwing guts back in shallow water is an aesthetic thing. I hate seeing fish guts people have thrown back in shallow water.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
McPilchuck
Wild Bagger



Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 859 | TRs
Location: near Snohomish, Wa.
McPilchuck
  Top

Wild Bagger
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 12:51 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Until one tries "fish on the coals" without any pan or foil, he will not know  this is the best way to cook trout, big ones especially...ask Glen Lee, Mark Boyle, Steve White, Mike Quinn, including myself...all Trail Blazers.

McPil

--------------
in the granite high-wild alpine land . . .
www.alpinequest.com
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Tom
Admin



Joined: 15 Dec 2001
Posts: 15577 | TRs

Tom
  Top

Admin
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 1:02 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
McPil, so how big are the big ones and how long do you cook them?  Do you turn them over?
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
McPilchuck
Wild Bagger



Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 859 | TRs
Location: near Snohomish, Wa.
McPilchuck
  Top

Wild Bagger
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 1:22 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cooking in the coals:  The fire has to have lots of hot coals built up, no flame, then put the fish on the coal bed, cook on one side almost 15 minutes, then flip it over to its other side.  When it is done, slide it out gently and remove the back bone and serve.  If throughly cooked the bone will peel completly out leaving very few.  Add some seasoning to taste if you wish if you haven't added some in the caviity already during cooking.  The entire process preserves the smoke flavor as well as the juices, as the skin becomes like leather and seals everything in.  The trick is not to flip it until one side (flesh) is completely done.  When you have mastered this way of cooking trout, you will never again take pans or foil along to fry or cook trout, trust me.

Big trout in high lakes are anything over 18 inches IMO...

McPil

--------------
in the granite high-wild alpine land . . .
www.alpinequest.com
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
troutman
Member
Member


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 89 | TRs

troutman
  Top

Member
PostWed Sep 17, 2003 2:30 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Okay, I have a good recipie:

Poached trout pasta pesto
Poach trout in butter, salt, pepper and lemonjuiceand 2 cups of water  in your 1 quart alpine pot. Cut trout in half if they don't fit.
When the meat is cooked, debone and deskin and dehead trout so it is just meat and set aside.

Boil spiral noodles next and drain.

Add trout, pesto sauce (basil and garlic style)
and grated (not shredded) parmesean cheeze.

Serve.

Note- One bag of pasta and one jar of pesto serves two. Two 12" - 14" trout each is plenty for each hiker and each serving.

I use this recipie to save weight and fuel time. Be sure to change the jar to a plastic screwtop container and then put container in a ziplock. Oil can get messy if it leakes.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
SeaNat
Member
Member


Joined: 03 Sep 2003
Posts: 63 | TRs
Location: West Seattle
SeaNat
  Top

Member
PostThu Sep 18, 2003 9:55 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Tom wrote:
Actully, 2drx was quoting from the WDFW site. 

It just sounds to me he's trying to make the point of dump NO guts at all when I see nothing worng with returning to nature what already exists and nature can use a little help in this area. But even the WDFW site to me reads: no shallow water dumping, but deeper or faster water is O.K.

Back to the subject: Since I'm usually pretty hungry after a long day of hiking, a little olive oil and fish/poultry spice does the trick. I have an OPEN COUNTRY set with a non-stick pan. Since high country lakes as a rule don't have very big fish, "pan-size" fits my pan perfectly. Although I saw some huge ones pulled out of Squaw Lake earlier this year, I suppose cooking those in foil over hot coals would work in a pinch.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Dave Weyrick
Member
Member


Joined: 16 Dec 2001
Posts: 305 | TRs
Location: Poulsbo, WA
Dave Weyrick
  Top

Member
PostThu Sep 18, 2003 12:04 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
This rainbow cooked over the coals was delicious.

--------------
If I'd known ya was gonna use bait I wouldn't a brought ya!




Fish in Coals.jpg
Fish in Coals.jpg
 Fish in Coals.jpg (56 KB)
File downloaded or viewed 523 time(s)

Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Dslayer
Member
Member


Joined: 02 Jan 2002
Posts: 652 | TRs
Location: Home:  Selah  Work: Zillah
Dslayer
  Top

Member
PostThu Sep 18, 2003 12:28 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Dangit-that's gone over the line.

I'm sitting here salivating listening to all your descriptions of cooking trout-then you have to post pictures of them!  Trout-anyway you cook them-are my favorite thing in the world to eat.  Just fired some up for dinner last night-but there's nothing as good as cooking and eating them within minutes of catching them.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Food & Grub > frying trout in the high country.
  Happy Birthday btspman, OlyBoots, Waterman, Ruebezahl!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy