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MCaver
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PostSat Mar 16, 2002 8:19 pm 
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Did some nice showshoeing today, first time in a while. Am I the only one that steams like a lumber mill while out in the snow? I stopped to take some pictures and was putting out so much steam I had to stand away from the camera to shoot. You could see the steam in the photos! I even fogged up the lens several time just by standing near it. I shed my fleece and that helped some, but I wasn't even sweating. You'd think I was brewing coffee in my clothes by the heat I was putting out.

So how does everyone dry their gear after a wet day? Clothes usually air dry themselves. Gloves, hats, etc can go in the dryer if safe. But what about shoes? I want to go out again tomorrow but I don't relish the idea of starting out with wet shoes. I suppose I could start a fire just for that. Think I'll try putting them in front of the heater overnight. Ideas? What do you do?
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MCaver
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PostSat Mar 16, 2002 8:27 pm 
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I forgot to mention, I also glissaded down a slope and banged my tailbone on a root. eek.gif  I think my GoreTex pants are coated with teflon.
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polarbear
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PostSat Mar 16, 2002 8:43 pm 
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I wonder if gaiters would help.  My boots get wet mostly from snow getting inside them which my feet melt.

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MCaver
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PostSat Mar 16, 2002 8:57 pm 
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I wore gaiters today and they did help quite a bit, but my shoes are still pretty wet. Maybe I need new shoes.
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Beave
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PostSat Mar 16, 2002 9:47 pm 
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I tear up newspapers and stuff the shoe tight....

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Allison
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PostSat Mar 16, 2002 10:16 pm 
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If they are wet from the outside in, maybe you need to try some snow-seal. If they are wet from the inside out, pull the feetbeds out for one, and then I think they dry a little faster if you put them upside down. I'm guessing those electric ski boot dryers that look like a cylinder w/a cord on it, you stick them inside the boots, that those would work. I think they are less than $20.
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rubberfeets
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PostSat Mar 16, 2002 10:21 pm 
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Hey, you might do a little more research on the old newspapers in boots idea. I seem to recall that isn't recommended any more. Who the heck is that shoe repair guy in Fremont? Brain ain't working -- must be altitude damage. Was he recommending against it?
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lopper
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PostSat Mar 16, 2002 11:05 pm 
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David Page is probably the boot-master you're referring to.

I remember taking my 17-ton Raichle Gallo Montans up to his old shop above the Swallow's Nest to be given new life.  They lasted another decade or so......
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Slide Alder Slayer
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PostSun Mar 17, 2002 10:51 am 
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Mcaver, my wife and I switched from three season insoles to “Isolator Insoles” for winter snowshowing. Insulated insoles made a big difference in reducing condensation in my boots and my feet are a lot warmer.

I was also a big time steamer snowshoeing and had problems fogging my glasses until I switched to just wearing a base layer and a soft shell, mine is the Ibex Ice Fall Jacket. My overheating is substantially reduced, and if I start to get a little colder, I put on the Power Stretch 50 Balaclava from Outdoor Research or a more insulated hat and avoid over layering.

I am certainly not the expert in this area, but this is what has worked for me.
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Snowshoer
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PostSun Mar 17, 2002 8:21 pm 
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After a hundred snowshoe trips, I think I've finally figured out the clothes thing. The key is to stay just slightly cool. That may mean removing and adding clothes numerous times, but the time spent is worth it. Why do people take 100,000 items in their pack, but won't stop and change layers?! After all, taking all the stuff is to ensure comfort. But laziness negates all the effort.

So I wear the thinnest leggings and thinnest short-sleeve shirt. Then add thicker layers to suit. Most of the time on uphill snowshoeing (even at 25 degrees like today) all I wear is the short sleeve and rolled up leggings. Avoid getting hot (that is what summer is for). As soon as I stop I put on clothes one at a time until comfortable. I'll bundle up big time for lunch stops. Companions who wear the same shell layers and fleece are all sweaty when we get to the destination. Then they don't add anything. Then they want to turn back 5 minutes after we get there! Sheesh!
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Dslayer
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PostMon Mar 18, 2002 9:46 am 
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Snowshoer-

Your thinking is basically mine-I don't know about short sleeves in 25 degree weather-but basically when I know I'm going to get a workout-regardless of weather-I wear less clothing and I always bring a dry change with me.  I'm like you-when I get to a destination, I want to hang out a while, often start a fire and have some grub and look around.  

And the worse the weather is-the more likely you'll have  not as many people around which makes a change(s) even more important.

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"The Second Amendment of the Bill of Rights is my concealed weapon permit."-Ted Nugent
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MCaver
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PostMon Mar 18, 2002 11:04 am 
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Thanks for the tips, guys. It definitely gives me something to start with. My shoes dried out nicely in front of a fire, so I wa able to go out Sunday as well and take pictures in the beautiful weather we had up on the North Cascades Highway. My shoes were only damp inside, so the gaiters must have done the job. I think the dampness was just from sweat. I did notice after taking off the fleece on Saturday that I was perfectly comfortable trudging around in a double layer of polypro (one log sleeve, one short sleeve) so I'll probably start off with that next time. The fleece can always go on when I stop for photos.
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Dante
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PostMon Mar 18, 2002 11:13 am 
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What Snowshoer and Dslayer said smile.gif  The "system" I've developed over the years is the lightest base layer I can find and a highly breathable but water resistant shell.  Until recently I used an old Supplex Nylon anorak and pants, but they were pretty burnt up and scraped, so I replaced them with a Montane Featherlite Shell.  

For me the shell slows the evaporative cooling effect long enought for the base layer to get pretty dry before I start to get cold and have to add a layer.

I also really like some goofy looking Coolmax "boxers" I got at a running store.  They're basically tights cut off above the knee.  They're lighter than tights and so far I haven't had any trouble with cold knees.

Drying oots fast at home or in the field can be tricky.  On my last showshoe trip, I took the Gore-Tex Asolos I bought instead of my old leather boots both the boots and my feet stayed drier.  For me internal moisture (sweat) is a bigger problem than external moisture.  I don't think my old leather boots breathed well enough.  I also brought lots of socks.  

Once I got home, the Asolos also dried WAY faster than the old leather boots.  I just rest them upside down over a heater vent.  They usually dry completely over night.
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Timber Cruiser
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PostTue Mar 19, 2002 2:09 pm 
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I'll put in a plug for a Peet Boot Dryer.  I've used them every day of the week when working in the woods and always had dry, odorless boots the next day.  Won't damage leather like quick drying in front of the fire, under the dash heater, or in the oven!

"Made in the USA. Ideal for leather, canvas, rubber, vinyl, cloth plastic and all modern fabrics. Thermal convection drying removes perspiration, wetness and resulting odor from any type of shoe or boot. Plug in, warm air rises naturally to circulate and penetrate soaked shoes."

You can dry gloves on them as well.  If you buy extensions, you can dry taller boots.  Should run about $25-$35

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Forum Index > Trail Talk > Showshoe Blues - Steamin' & Dryin'
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