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polarbear
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PostThu Nov 04, 2004 11:18 pm 
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This Seattle Art Museum lecture looks interesting...

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Between 1774 and 1792, Spain realized nine voyages to the waters of Washington, British Columbia and Alaska. Philippe L. Sieler, Visiting Scholar, University of Southern California, discusses these voyages in the context of changing European political, intellectual and economic trends. Co-sponsored by the Center for Spanish Studies and the Center for West European Studies, at the University of Washington. Free with museum admission.

Spanish Voyages to the Pacific Northwest
Nov 6, 2004
12:45 p.m.
Nordstrom Lecture Hall
link

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...and a window that looks out on Corcovado...  Corcovado Hill
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mike
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PostFri Nov 05, 2004 9:44 am 
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If you are interested in this topic an interesting winter read is "The Voyage of the Sutil and Mexicana 1792, The last Spanish exploration of the Northwest Coast of America'  John kendrick (translator) AC Clark Spokane 1991
These two ships explored the Straits of Juan de Fuca and the San Juan and Gulf islands leaving a legacy of of names that we still use. Told from the journals of the explorers and gives an excellent view of what it looked like around here before the arrival en mass of Europeans.

(this is a History thread)
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touron
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PostThu Dec 02, 2004 8:06 pm 
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I just got back from the Seattle Art Museum exhibit, Spain in the Age of Exploration, which runs through Jan 2.  If you get a chance to see it, go!  Great paintings, ancient maps, suits of armor for kings, suits of armor for little kings to be, religious booklets written in Nahuatl, Spanish drawings of their encounters with PNW natives, and some of the native artifacts they collected, guilded chests, plus there are some side exhibits of Northwest mountain paintings and Renaissance art.  up.gif  up.gif

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Touron is a nougat of Arabic origin made with almonds and honey or sugar, without which it would just not be Christmas in Spain.
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Quark
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PostThu Dec 02, 2004 8:43 pm 
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Yah, Polarbear, I went a few Sundays ago, and sure did enjoy it!  Seeing the old astrolabes & navigation equipment was very cool, too.

Look closely at the paintings - the depiction of cloth is so detailed it looks real (you can also see the damage inbreeded had done, but you don't have to look too closely to see that). My freind Lisa kept going back again and again to look at the tapestry - wonderful and horrific monsters coming out of the sea and crawling onto land to corrupt Mankind - what a beautiful piece!

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"...Other than that, the post was more or less accurate."

Bernardo, NW Hikers' Bureau Chief of Reporting
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Dogpatch
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PostThu Dec 02, 2004 8:47 pm 
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Man oh man. The Spain show at SAM is a beauty. Don't miss it. I'm going back for a second look.
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touron
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PostThu Dec 02, 2004 10:30 pm 
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Those tapestries had to have taken a tremendous amount of time to make (but this isn't the place to start a long tapestry thread hihi.gif ).  Did anyone else play the Masterpiece as a kid?  It looks to be out of print on Hasbro's website, but that was a great game for familiarizing yourself with some famous paintings.  Every once in awhile one of those paintings pops up in a museum or book.  In this case it was one of the Velazquez paintings, or at least I thought it was.  I can't find it online anywhere.  It's the one of the king in the jaunty cowboyish type hat.

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Touron is a nougat of Arabic origin made with almonds and honey or sugar, without which it would just not be Christmas in Spain.
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Alpenstock
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PostWed Dec 22, 2004 10:58 pm 
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Sounds like a great exhibit!  Here’s another exhibit not to miss!  An exhibit of 19th century paintings of pristine American landscapes, including works by Thomas Cole, Asher B. Durand, Frederic E. Church, and Albert Bierstadt are on display at the Tacoma Art Museum, through January 16, 2005. Check out the image at the Tacoma Art Museum website of the painting titled “In the Mountains”, painted in 1867 by Albert Bierstadt (my favorite artist).
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Stones
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PostWed Dec 29, 2004 11:50 pm 
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I went there today with the family.  We took the ST 511 Express bus from Lynnwood Park & Ride and got off right there at 2nd and University.  This sure beats driving and parking in downtown Seattle.

Hurry before this show goes away (last day Jan 3).  The audio players are excellent and even have an audio track for the kids.  Excellent show.

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Let me stand next to your fire
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cheakamus
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PostThu Dec 30, 2004 2:31 pm 
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When I lived in Vancouver (B.C.), the beach below my neighborhood was known as Spanish Banks (between Jericho/Locarno and Wreck Beaches).  I always understood the name derived from the Spanish explorations, and that the cannonballs that neighbors dug up from time to time in their gardens were from the Spanish firing at the Indians from their vessels.  Apparently the Vancouver Museum has quite a collection of these cannonballs (now used mainly as house ballast), which people are always giving them.
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