Forum Index > Full Moon Saloon > What are you reading?
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
olderthanIusedtobe
Member
Member


Joined: 05 Sep 2011
Posts: 5991 | TRs
Location: Shoreline
olderthanIusedtobe
  Top

Member
PostWed Oct 31, 2018 12:34 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Okay, out of 4 Heinlein books I've read, 3 of them contained some kind of group/communal marriage arrangement.  Leads one to believe the author must've actually believed that was a good idea?  He's a creative and imaginative writer, but maybe a loon as well?
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
olderthanIusedtobe
Member
Member


Joined: 05 Sep 2011
Posts: 5991 | TRs
Location: Shoreline
olderthanIusedtobe
  Top

Member
PostWed Nov 21, 2018 3:09 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Given up on several books lately.  Lee Child to the rescue!  The latest Jack Reacher novel is a page turner for sure, gonna plow thru it in a couple days.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Hesman
Member
Member


Joined: 24 Oct 2005
Posts: 691 | TRs

Hesman
  Top

Member
PostWed Nov 21, 2018 3:37 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Avoiding the Sudden Stop by George Heuston. Heuston writes about the climbs he went on as a teenager in Washington in the 1960s.

Currently listening to The Great Quake by Henry Fountain. It is about the March 27, 1964 earthquake in Alaska and what geologists learned from it. Very interesting listen so far. (I’ve been on an audio book binge lately, mostly while driving to and from work, doing chores around the yard/house and walks in the neighborhood.)

Of course I have to throw in a suspense novel for good measure: Shadow Tyrants by Clive Cussler.

--------------
You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time. - Abraham Lincoln
Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened. - Dr. Seuss
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Hesman
Member
Member


Joined: 24 Oct 2005
Posts: 691 | TRs

Hesman
  Top

Member
PostWed Nov 21, 2018 3:42 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
olderthanIusedtobe wrote:
He's a creative and imaginative writer, but maybe a loon as well?

I read that he was a brilliant writer, but a bit of a nut job outside of his writing career.

--------------
You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time. - Abraham Lincoln
Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened. - Dr. Seuss
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
olderthanIusedtobe
Member
Member


Joined: 05 Sep 2011
Posts: 5991 | TRs
Location: Shoreline
olderthanIusedtobe
  Top

Member
PostSun Dec 02, 2018 9:55 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I recently tried working on 3 books simultaneously.  I gave up on 2 of the 3, so that didn't work out very well.  The latest Jack Reacher was entertaining though.

Trying 3 at a time again.  I'm mildly curious about the movie coming out soon "Mortal Engines."  I knew it was based on a book series.  I wasn't really planning on reading it, but it jumped out at me at the library, so I'm giving it a go.  Interesting so far.  Post apocalyptic YA sci fi.  Most of the earth is wrecked and cities have become mobile, rolling around on huge tracks like tanks.  Bigger cities swallow smaller cities whole and cannibalize them for parts and materials.  There is some scheming behind the scenes for a faction to achieve greater power, that's about as far as I've gotten.  By Phillip Reeve.  I figured it was a fairly recent series but the copyright is 2001.

Haven't read anything by this author before--A. J. Banner.  Saw a review in the paper that sounded interesting.  Book is called "After Nightfall."  It's set in Pugetopolis.  Starts at a dinner party with some serious tension between various members of the party.  The next morning one of the guests is found dead at the base of a bluff.  Haven't got far into it yet but assuming everybody will be cast in a suspicious light, won't really know what happened til the end.

Last one is a autobiography/advice book by Anna Faris.  I rarely read biographies/autobiographies, especially about celebs, but I like her and she's a local (Edmonds) before going to Hollywood.  Thought I'd take a flyer on it.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
lookout bob
WTA proponent.....



Joined: 12 Apr 2005
Posts: 2754 | TRs
Location: wta work while in between lookouts
lookout bob
  Top

WTA proponent.....
PostSat Dec 08, 2018 9:04 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Reading John McPhee's latest, "The Patch."   Terrific as always.... up.gif  up.gif  cool.gif

--------------
"Altitude is its own reward"
John Jerome ( from "On Mountains")
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Hesman
Member
Member


Joined: 24 Oct 2005
Posts: 691 | TRs

Hesman
  Top

Member
PostSat Dec 08, 2018 9:32 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Listening to Swan Song by Robert McCammon. Tried reading it years ago but never finished it. (There have been a number of print books I never finished, but found the audio version very engaging.) Found the audio version and have been able to listen to it and at 34 hours and 20 minutes, it has taken over a week to listen to. Got a couple of hours left and should be able to finish it today.

--------------
You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time. - Abraham Lincoln
Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened. - Dr. Seuss
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
zephyr
aka friendly hiker



Joined: 21 Jun 2009
Posts: 1822 | TRs
Location: West Seattle
zephyr
  Top

aka friendly hiker
PostSat Jan 05, 2019 6:55 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
The Parthenon Marbles by Christopher Hitchens, Verso, London, 1987/2008.  The late Christopher Hitchens writes a short, persuasive book on why the marble sculptures taken from the pediment of the Parthenon in Athens, Greece by Lord Elgin should be returned to their native city.  Great review here at Random House.

I also read an excellent little paper back that I found in a used bookstore filled with lavish illustrations.  This goes great with the Hitchens book.  The Search for Ancient Greece by Roland and Francoise Etienne, Abrams Publishers, 1992.  It’s available online from various dealers.  Beautiful paintings and drawings of the early days in the development of archaeology in Greece.  A short review here at GoodReads.  ~z
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
olderthanIusedtobe
Member
Member


Joined: 05 Sep 2011
Posts: 5991 | TRs
Location: Shoreline
olderthanIusedtobe
  Top

Member
PostMon Jan 14, 2019 8:22 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Been on a bit of a cold streak.  Gave up on a few books and struggled to get thru some others.  I loved "Foundryside" by Robert Jackson Bennett.  Read the first book of his Divine Cities trilogy several months ago.  It was okay but I wasn't that into it.  I wasn't necessarily going to return to it, but decided to give it a second chance.  Liking the second book "City of Blades" more than the first.

In brief in the trilogy there were several Divine entities that controlled most of the world, several cities/nations each followed their preferred deity.  An oppressed people who had no divinity of their own managed to kill all of them (or so they thought) and usurp control from their oppressors.  Disturbing hints that there is still some divine presence in the world keep popping up.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
zephyr
aka friendly hiker



Joined: 21 Jun 2009
Posts: 1822 | TRs
Location: West Seattle
zephyr
  Top

aka friendly hiker
PostTue Jan 15, 2019 8:06 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
The Secret Token Myth, Obsession, and the Search for the Lost Colony of Roanoke by Andrew Lawler  Doubleday, 2018.  A little slow at times, but overall a great read to learn about our early Colonial history, the geography and cultural history of the mainly North Carolinian coastal waters, bays, rivers, and islands.  I love maps and this book has lots of them--old and contemporary.  Here's a review on Kirkus.   From the Penguin Books review:   A sweeping account of America’s oldest unsolved mystery, the people racing to unearth its answer, and the sobering truths–about race, gender, and immigration–exposed by the Lost Colony of Roanoke

In 1587, 115 men, women, and children arrived at Roanoke Island on the coast of North Carolina. Chartered by Queen Elizabeth I, their colony was to establish England’s first foothold in the New World. But when the colony’s leader, John White, returned to Roanoke from a resupply mission, his settlers were nowhere to be found. They left behind only a single clue–a “secret token” carved into a tree. Neither White nor any other European laid eyes on the colonists again.


There are more reviews and many links on the author's webpage.  You can really dive deep there.  I found the early history and many descriptions of the various Indians (mainly Algonquians) who lived and thrived there I found fascinating.  ~z
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
olderthanIusedtobe
Member
Member


Joined: 05 Sep 2011
Posts: 5991 | TRs
Location: Shoreline
olderthanIusedtobe
  Top

Member
PostFri Feb 08, 2019 1:43 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I'd seen several glowing reviews of Tomi Adeyemi's "Children of Blood and Bone" so I'm giving it a try.  Okay but nothing great.  I really don't get critics (books, movies, whatever), they just react to things so differently than I do most of the time.  It's fantasy, where magic has been purged from the land by an oppressive ruler, but maybe it can be brought back again.  I'm not even sure if this is YA or not.

So while I'm about halfway thru that and muddling along, I had to finish off Robert Jackson Bennett's Divine Cities trilogy.  Got the third one, City of Miracles, and getting into it right away.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
olderthanIusedtobe
Member
Member


Joined: 05 Sep 2011
Posts: 5991 | TRs
Location: Shoreline
olderthanIusedtobe
  Top

Member
PostWed Feb 13, 2019 12:45 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
olderthanIusedtobe wrote:
I had to finish off Robert Jackson Bennett's Divine Cities trilogy.  Got the third one, City of Miracles, and getting into it right away.

This series just kept getting better.  Very heartily recommend it, but you have to be committed to reading all 3.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Full Moon Saloon > What are you reading?
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy