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Steve
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Steve
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PostTue Apr 21, 2020 9:55 am 
So far this year The Gulag Archipelago Vol I - III unabridged, The Happiness Hypothesis, The Way I Heard it and now In The First Circle
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Mike Collins
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PostTue Apr 21, 2020 1:25 pm 
McLoughlin and Old Oregon by Eva Emery Dye is historical fiction with a copyright date of 1900. The book recounts the years when John McGlouglin was the chief factor at Fort Vancouver. She offers due homage to the man who gained respect from trappers, the First Nations, and early settlers of Oregon by his benevolence to all.  The author herself settled in Oregon City and was a leader in the women's suffrage movement which thankfully came to fruition.
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Mike Collins
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PostThu Apr 23, 2020 8:47 am 
Remaining at home has given me added time for reading about the history involved with westward expansion. Incidents of Travel and Adventure in the Far West with Col. Fremont's Last Expedition by S.N. Carvalho provides an eye witness account to one such episode. Carvalho accompanied Fremont on an expedition from St. Louis westward to California in the winter of 1853. The text allows the reader to enter a world where buffalo still amassed in the many thousands and the First Nations still controlled their homelands.
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Mike Collins
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PostSat Apr 25, 2020 1:22 pm 
Arctic Labyrinth by Glyn Williams reviews a half-dozen of the numerous failed and sometimes tragic voyages that were made in pursuit of the elusive dream of finding the Northwest Passage. One such expedition by John Ross was "...stocked with fourteen tons of canned meat, soup and vegetables and 3 1/2 tons of tobacco and 4,500 gallons of over-proof rum." The book delves into journals, diaries, and official records in offering a narrative showing both the strength of human fortitude and also the weakness of chasing delusions.
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grannyhiker
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PostSat Apr 25, 2020 1:36 pm 
I'm almost through the second volume of Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall trilogy, Bring Up the Bodies.  While her writing is excellent, I hope I can make it through the last volume, the recently published The Mirror and the Light, without becoming too depressed.  I should have realized that any fiction taking place during the reign of Henry VIII is going to have lots and lots of beheadings!
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grannyhiker
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PostSat Apr 25, 2020 1:38 pm 
I'm almost through the second volume of Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall trilogy, Bring Up the Bodies.  While her writing is excellent, I hope I can make it through the last volume, the recently published The Mirror and the Light, without becoming too depressed.  I should have realized that any fiction taking place during the reign of Henry VIII is going to have lots and lots of beheadings!
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Kim Brown
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PostSat Apr 25, 2020 2:58 pm 
I haven't read it (yet), but check out a new book about the fight to save Miner's Ridge, titled An Open Pit Visible from the Moon by Adam Sowards, who I understand was on the initial Advisory Council of the PNT. Also I understand a local former USFS employee had a hand in some of the research on the book.

It's new, full price on Amazon and of course the Kindle version is available.
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Washakie
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PostMon Apr 27, 2020 1:38 pm 
Mother Night, again.
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Malachai Constant
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Malachai Constant
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PostMon Apr 27, 2020 1:39 pm 
Be careful with what you pretend to be.
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Washakie
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PostMon Apr 27, 2020 1:52 pm 
You understand.

Many do not.
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Mike Collins
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PostThu Apr 30, 2020 12:45 pm 
The Race to the White Continent by Alan Gurney relives the rivalries of the exploring parties to Antarctica for the French, British, and United States. But exploration meant the ships hulls banged against ice floes before their retreat to more friendly warm waters. The author gleaned much of his narrative from ship's logs and letters offering a glimpse into the life of sailors during the 1830s as an added benefit to the reading.
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Mike Collins
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Mike Collins
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PostSat May 02, 2020 9:07 am 
The Northwest Passage by Land is an account of a land journey taken in 1863-64 from Edmonton to Victoria. The author, Lord Milton, writes of a time now gone when buffalo and bear were hunted for food along the way. He also offers glimpses into the culture of the First Nations he encountered during the trek. When writing about the mountain Cree he states, "The moose is a sacred animal, and certain portions of the meat-such as the breast, liver, kidneys, and tongue-must be eaten at once, and the whole consumed at a single meal. Women are not allowed to taste the tongue, and all scraps are burnt, never given to the dogs."
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mike
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PostSat May 02, 2020 11:13 am 
Mike Collins wrote:
an account of a land journey taken in 1863-64 from Edmonton to Victoria.

Mike, check out "First Man West", Walter Sheppe
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Mike Collins
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PostThu May 07, 2020 2:34 pm 
Joseph Baker by Robert Wing is a biography about the Senior Lieutenant aboard Vancouver's ship Discovery. Mount Baker is of course named after this man who went on to serve as captain on his own vessels in future years. The author visited the homes of several of the officers involved and brings the lives of the families into the narrative.
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Anne Elk
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Anne Elk
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PostThu May 07, 2020 8:23 pm 
Classic Krakauer -  a collection of Jon Krakauer's essays, and Hidden Valley Road - Inside the Mind of an American Family by Robert Kolker, a just-published chronicle about a family with 12 children, 10 of whom suffered from schizophenia.  The link is to the NPR feature on the book.  Available to borrow in electronic form from Seattle Public Library.
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