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Mike Collins
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PostSat May 02, 2020 9:07 am 
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The Northwest Passage by Land is an account of a land journey taken in 1863-64 from Edmonton to Victoria. The author, Lord Milton, writes of a time now gone when buffalo and bear were hunted for food along the way. He also offers glimpses into the culture of the First Nations he encountered during the trek. When writing about the mountain Cree he states, "The moose is a sacred animal, and certain portions of the meat-such as the breast, liver, kidneys, and tongue-must be eaten at once, and the whole consumed at a single meal. Women are not allowed to taste the tongue, and all scraps are burnt, never given to the dogs."
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mike
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PostSat May 02, 2020 11:13 am 
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Mike Collins wrote:
an account of a land journey taken in 1863-64 from Edmonton to Victoria.

Mike, check out "First Man West", Walter Sheppe
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Mike Collins
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PostThu May 07, 2020 2:34 pm 
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Joseph Baker by Robert Wing is a biography about the Senior Lieutenant aboard Vancouver's ship Discovery. Mount Baker is of course named after this man who went on to serve as captain on his own vessels in future years. The author visited the homes of several of the officers involved and brings the lives of the families into the narrative.
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Anne Elk
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PostThu May 07, 2020 8:23 pm 
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Classic Krakauer -  a collection of Jon Krakauer's essays, and Hidden Valley Road - Inside the Mind of an American Family by Robert Kolker, a just-published chronicle about a family with 12 children, 10 of whom suffered from schizophenia.  The link is to the NPR feature on the book.  Available to borrow in electronic form from Seattle Public Library.

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"There are yahoos out there.  Itís why we canít have nice things."  - Tom Mahood
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cdestroyer
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PostFri May 08, 2020 9:24 am 
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just picked up a copy of this one...very interesting


barepaw wrote

"The Coming Plague" by Laurie Garrett is pretty good. Parts may seem dry, especially if you have no medical interest. However, she does a good job of explaining how we're all screwed.
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Mike Collins
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PostFri May 08, 2020 2:45 pm 
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Washington West of the Cascades by Herbert Hunt is a large 3 volume set of historical information about the explorers, First Nations, and pioneers of our state. It was published in 1917 but offers a wealth of knowledge about our state. Unfortunately I only have Volume 1. When discussing Stampede Pass he writes "At ten minutes past noon on May 3, 1888, the shot that let the warm breeze of Puget Sound through the Stampede bore to the eastern side of the Cascades was fired and the mountains had been pierced. The tunnel was 9,850 ft in length." The blasting parties working from simultaneously from both ends for two years were only off by 1/4 inch. The book is much better than watching the continuing tragedy of Covid-19 on the news.
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Mike Collins
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PostTue May 12, 2020 12:30 pm 
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Racks-The Natural History of Antlers and the Animals The Wear Them by David Petersen is a concise book to answer questions like,  Why do animals have antlers? and Why do both sexes of caribou have antlers? You will definitely learn more about the sheds that we sometimes find.
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cdestroyer
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PostThu May 14, 2020 7:13 am 
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"The Coming Plague" by Laurie Garrett


worth posting again
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Mike Collins
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PostThu May 21, 2020 1:59 pm 
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Beyond the Stony Mountains-Nature in the American West from Lewis and Clark to Today by Daniel Botkin traces the famous journey from its beginning until the end at Fort Clatsop. The change in the landscape from 1804 to modern time is discussed along with helpful quotes from the official reports. It is an enjoyable book for those interested in early exploration of the West.
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Mike Collins
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PostFri May 22, 2020 1:28 pm 
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Great River of the West-Essays on the Columbia River is a collection of eight essays edited by William Lang discussing a range of topics that are of interest to those who want to learn more about this important major river. I especially enjoyed the chapter written about the issues of importance for female pioneers. The essays help to investigate the river from different perspectives. The reader will gain a deeper understand of its importance to the First Nations who originally called it home.
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Mike Collins
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PostThu Jun 11, 2020 4:51 pm 
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Valley of the Spirits-The Upper Skagit Indians of Western Washington by June McCormick Collins offers a description of the people, villages, means of subsistence, kinship, shamanism, and the spirit world of the native Skagit people. The information gleaned by the author is dated as her time with those First Nation people was between 1946-1974 but nonetheless is a worthwhile discourse on their heritage.
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Malachai Constant
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PostSat Jun 20, 2020 1:13 pm 
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Bad Blood by John Carreyrou 2018 the story of the Theranos debacle. Combines the themes of hubris, mendacity, patent law, Silicon Valley, and fraud detailing promotion of a defective blood testing device with many famous names involved. I recognized many of the places where the action occurred.

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"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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Kascadia
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PostSun Jun 21, 2020 10:45 am 
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Malachai Constant wrote:
Bad Blood by John Carreyrou 2018 the story of the Theranos debacle. Combines the themes of hubris, mendacity, patent law, Silicon Valley, and fraud detailing promotion of a defective blood testing device with many famous names involved. I recognized many of the places where the action occurred.

This is an excellent documentary on the topic.  We picked it up on Amazon (no HBO).

https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=the+inventor&docid=607990347515561071&mid=55376F95744FF2BF412C55376F95744FF2BF412C&view=detail&FORM=VIREHT

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It is as though I had read a divine text, written into the world itself, not with letters but rather with essential objects, saying:
Man, stretch thy reason hither, so thou mayest comprehend these things. Johannes Kepler
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Malachai Constant
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PostWed Jul 01, 2020 3:09 pm 
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The Testaments, by Margaret Atwood sequel to The Handmaids Tale, interesting but not as paranoia inducing as itís predecessor. More of a thriller than a polemic

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"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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olderthanIusedtobe
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PostWed Aug 05, 2020 7:00 pm 
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I finished a library book that I didn't particularly enjoy just before the shut down.  It sat in my room for 3 months or however long.  I got totally out of the habit of reading, didn't feel like picking up any of the numerous books on my shelf I've read before, most several times.  Finally got a new book from the library, didn't grab me at all and I set it aside.

FINALLY I think I've got my hands on something I'll enjoy.  Robert Jackson Bennett's "Foundryside" was fantastic I thought, read it I guess close to 2 years ago.  Book 2 of the trilogy came out in March or so and I was near the top of the wait list from the library...but then covid happened.  Picked up "Shorefall" today and it's off to a promising start.
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