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zephyr
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PostSun Apr 04, 2021 11:02 am 
neek wrote:
Good discussion for another thread perhaps, as I don't want to derail this long-standing one.

Yes.  Please and Thank you.  wink.gif    ~z

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olderthanIusedtobe
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PostFri Apr 09, 2021 7:33 am 
olderthanIusedtobe wrote:
I'm on another losing streak with books.  Currently attempting "The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak.  I thought very highly of the movie adaptation.  The jury is out on the book.  I'm about 100 pages in.  It's very episodic.  There is basically no plot to speak of, at least not so far.  Considering I'm about 1/4 of the way thru, I expected it to start moving in some direction by now.

Well, after 130 or 140 pages I pulled the plug.  Story was going absolutely nowhere still.  Prose and characters weren't interesting enough to keep plugging away.



Finally got my hands on something that I'm enjoying.  "Radiant Angel" by Nelson DeMille.  I've read several of his books, hadn't thought about him in years.  A couple stand alone, and a couple with the recurring character John Corey (like this one).  He's not quite Jack Reacher, but a kind of in the same vein.  Tough guy, good cop/investigator who has issues w/ authority and sometimes doesn't play well with others, but gets the job done and thwarts the ne'er do wells.

In this one he's in what's supposed to be a low key government job, tailing diplomats and keeping tabs on them.  A Russian who is not a diplomat at all, previously a high ranking official w/ the rebranded KGB, is in NYC and looking to do some very bad things.

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zephyr
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PostTue Apr 13, 2021 11:42 am 
América: The Epic Story of Spanish North America, 1493-1898, Bloomsbury Publishing, New York, 2019.  Just completed reading this book over the past three weeks.  We don't often hear about what happened in detail during the Spanish exploration and conquest of much of North America since Columbus's "discovery" of the New World.  They swept through the South, Southwest, West and Southeast within decades of subjugating the West Indies and Central/South America.  Who knew that in their push into the American Southwest, they took contingents of both Aztec and Tlaxcalan warriors to bolster their ranks.  They sailed as far north as Vancouver Island and established an outpost in Nootka Sound for a time.

Here are some reviews:   Bloomsbury, Goodreads, and Kirkus. The book jacket design features Frederick Remington's  painting of Francisco Coronado's expedition march through the Southwest.  At the Seattle Public Library.    ~z


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graywolf
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PostTue Apr 13, 2021 12:00 pm 
The Gene by Siddhartha Mukherjee.  Fascinating book by someone with a great writing style.  Just recently finished The Laws of Medicine and The Emperor of all Maladies (Pulitzer Prize winner) by the same author.

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graywolf
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PostTue Apr 13, 2021 12:03 pm 
zephyr wrote:
América: The Epic Story of Spanish North America, 1493-1898, Bloomsbury Publishing, New York, 2019.  Just completed reading this book over the past three weeks.  We don't often hear about what happened in detail during the Spanish exploration and conquest of much of North America since Columbus's "discovery" of the New World.  They swept through the South, Southwest, West and Southeast within decades of subjugating the West Indies and Central/South America.  Who knew that in their push into the American Southwest, they took contingents of both Aztec and Tlaxcalan warriors to bolster their ranks.  They sailed as far north as Vancouver Island and established an outpost in Nootka Sound for a time.

Here are some reviews:   Bloomsbury, Goodreads, and Kirkus. The book jacket design features Frederick Remington's  painting of Francisco Coronado's expedition march through the Southwest.  At the Seattle Public Library.    ~z


You might find The Pueblo Revolt by David Roberts interesting.  It's about the Native American uprising against the Spanish.

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mike
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PostTue Apr 13, 2021 6:05 pm 
Of local interest.


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zephyr
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PostTue Apr 13, 2021 7:55 pm 
graywolf wrote:
You might find The Pueblo Revolt by David Roberts interesting.  It's about the Native American uprising against the Spanish.

Yes, it is interesting--very interesting.  Goodwin covers it quite well.  I also read about the uprising in Charles Mann's 1493.  I can't remember when I first learned about the Pueblo revolt in 1680, but it has always fascinated me that these people resisted strongly and were successful for a time.  As were the Maya down in the Guatemala highlands.

Thanks for the referral to Roberts book on the subject.  I will check it out.  ~z

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zephyr
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PostSun Apr 25, 2021 6:08 pm 
Thanks for the heads up.  I just finished reading David Roberts' The Pueblo Revolt:  The Secret Rebellion That Drove the Spaniards Out of the Southwest, Simon and Schuster, New York, 2004.  The Pueblo peoples are comprised of dozens of groups that share "common agricultural, material, and religious practices."  Their languages are from four different language families.  The Puebloans had been dominated by the Spanish for over 80 years until 1680 when they managed to force them out of New Mexico for at least a dozen years.

The author gathered his research from archives and collaborations with other historians, archeologists, and tribal members.  He spent a lot of time on location hiking, exploring, and camping in the ruins and historical sites.  Here's the GoodReads review.  There are many descriptions of pitched battles in villages or atop mesas, or even in Santa Fe between the Spanish, their allies, and the various Puebloan communities.  It's hard to understand the determination of the Spanish to dominate these people and their meager resources in this harsh environment.  Religious zeal was part of this story.  The Puebloans also had to deal with raids and wars from the Utes, the Navajos, and the Apaches.  Then at some point the Commanches arrived and fought them all.  It was a tough period.  ~z

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Mike Collins
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PostSun Apr 25, 2021 6:29 pm 
Food Plants of Coastal First Peoples by Nancy Turner describes over 100 plants which are traditionally harvested and eaten by the First Peoples on the coasts of Washington and British Columbia. She shares a wealth of information as she is a leading authority on ethnobotany in the Northwest. I plan on adding a few more foods for my gathering activities from what I learned.

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Brian R
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PostWed Apr 28, 2021 9:56 pm 
Always worth a re-read, and so relevant now: The Road to Serfdom, by Hayek. Just finished The Deep Dark, by Gregg Olsen--silver mining accident near Wallace Idaho in the 1970s. Really enjoyed it.

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zephyr
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PostThu May 06, 2021 9:49 pm 
Chaco Canyon by Robert and Florence Lister, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 1981, 1997.  I had a friend who recently explored a bit of New Mexico a couple of weeks ago.  He went to Chaco Culture National Historical Park.  I picked up this book from the library to learn about the culture.  A review can be found here.  The book reads well and is loaded with old photographs, maps, and drawings.  Chaco Canyon is located in northwestern New Mexico.  It's the site of numerous ancient pueblos long abandoned.  I think I have more of an understanding of the Anazazi now after reading this book.  The authors were a husband and wife archaeologist team who also explored and worked at Mesa Verde and other sites in the Four Corners area.

Per WikipediaBetween AD 900 and 1150, Chaco Canyon was a major center of culture for the Ancestral Puebloans.[a] Chacoans quarried sandstone blocks and hauled timber from great distances, assembling fifteen major complexes that remained the largest buildings ever built in North America until the 19th century.


The pic below is of Pueblo Bonito, the largest and most populated town.  (Note the large stack of rubble in the rear.  This is where a huge section of cliff spalled off and fell onto the site in 1941.)       ~z

.

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Malachai Constant
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PostThu May 06, 2021 11:21 pm 
We have been there several times and have explored the ruins and trails. My uncle was mayor and sheriff in Gallup, NM. I first visited in the 1950’s as a child and have been fascinated ever since. There is no great mystery as to where the inhabitants went if you speak with the present inhabitants of the First Nations pueblos the clans trace back to the original locations in the area. BTW Anasazi is a Dene (Navaho) term meaning old enemies or similar although they arrived long after the sites were abandoned. When I first visited the ground was covered with potsherds left by white “pot hunters” including many so called “archaeologists who carted the intact pots to Europe.

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zephyr
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PostFri May 07, 2021 9:36 am 
Malachai Constant wrote:
My uncle was mayor and sheriff in Gallup, NM. I first visited in the 1950’s as a child and have been fascinated ever since.

That's some pretty amazing childhood experience, Malachai.  I think you would really enjoy reading this one.  It talks a lot about the early days of excavation and preservation.  There was a trading post established that attracted Navajos from surrounding areas.  ~z

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Malachai Constant
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PostFri May 07, 2021 9:49 am 
Yes as a politician in Gallup he was on extremely good terms with all of the First Nations people and they invited up into many of their homes. This included pueblos which do not normally allow white visitors. They have an extremely dry sense of humor and a lot of insight. Gallop held a gathering or all tribes and parade at the fairgrounds in those days. I really liked the sand paintings which are quite similar to the Tibetan ones. Impermanence is part of the art.

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graywolf
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PostFri May 07, 2021 10:30 am 
zephyr wrote:
Chaco Canyon by Robert and Florence Lister, University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque, 1981, 1997.  I had a friend who recently explored a bit of New Mexico a couple of weeks ago.  He went to Chaco Culture National Historical Park.  I picked up this book from the library to learn about the culture.  A review can be found here.  The book reads well and is loaded with old photographs, maps, and drawings.  Chaco Canyon is located in northwestern New Mexico.  It's the site of numerous ancient pueblos long abandoned.  I think I have more of an understanding of the Anazazi now after reading this book.  The authors were a husband and wife archaeologist team who also explored and worked at Mesa Verde and other sites in the Four Corners area.

Per WikipediaBetween AD 900 and 1150, Chaco Canyon was a major center of culture for the Ancestral Puebloans.[a] Chacoans quarried sandstone blocks and hauled timber from great distances, assembling fifteen major complexes that remained the largest buildings ever built in North America until the 19th century.


The pic below is of Pueblo Bonito, the largest and most populated town.  (Note the large stack of rubble in the rear.  This is where a huge section of cliff spalled off and fell onto the site in 1941.)       ~z

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Okay, I'm putting that one on my list.  I've read "The Chaco Meridian" which was fascinating, but is also controversial.  Chaco Canyon fascinates me - haven't been there yet, but it is very high on my priority list of places to visit.

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