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graywolf
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PostFri May 07, 2021 10:31 am 
Malachai Constant wrote:
Yes as a politician in Gallup he was on extremely good terms with all of the First Nations people and they invited up into many of their homes. This included pueblos which do not normally allow white visitors. They have an extremely dry sense of humor and a lot of insight. Gallop held a gathering or all tribes and parade at the fairgrounds in those days. I really liked the sand paintings which are quite similar to the Tibetan ones. Impermanence is part of the art.

What a great personal history to be able to tap into - fascinating.

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Kim Brown
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PostSat May 08, 2021 10:47 am 
Wow, zephyr & Mal - your sure got me interested in reading about Chaco Canyon!

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" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
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Malachai Constant
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PostSat May 08, 2021 11:57 am 
There is one petroglyphs which is claimed to be Haley’s Comet of 1066 the same one featured in the Bayeux taplsserie. Who knows?

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"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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lookout bob
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PostTue May 25, 2021 11:36 am 
"Rock Me On The Water"  by Ronald Brownstein.  A poignant read so far about "the year Los Angeles transformed movies, Music, television and politics.  I'm enjoying the first few chapters a lot about the rise of Jackson Brown, Linda Ronstadt, the Eagles, Jane Fonda, Jack Nicholson, Warren Beatty, and a host of others.  Great read so far.... cool.gif  up.gif

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"Altitude is its own reward"
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Kim Brown
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PostSun Jun 13, 2021 10:24 pm 
Zephyr & Malachai;

I just finished the book on Chaco Canyon. i feel embarrassed that I didn't know about this! At. All!

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" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
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zephyr
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PostMon Jun 14, 2021 9:40 am 
Kim Brown wrote:
I just finished the book on Chaco Canyon.

Awesome.    Some great stories in that little book.  I had never known about that giant slab (Leaning Rock or ?) which stood there the entire time of the occupation and didn't fall until 1941.  It looked rather ominous in some of the photos.  ~z

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InFlight
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PostMon Jun 14, 2021 10:30 am 
The Log from the Sea of Cortez, - John Steinbeck, 1939

One quote that I liked...

"To name a thing has always been to make it familiar and therefore less dangerous to us. "Tree" the abstract may harbor some evil until it has a name, but once having a name one can cope with it."

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“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately...”  ― Henry David Thoreau
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Kim Brown
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PostMon Jun 14, 2021 1:16 pm 
zephyr wrote:
Kim Brown wrote:
I just finished the book on Chaco Canyon.

Awesome.    Some great stories in that little book.  I had never known about that giant slab (Leaning Rock or ?) which stood there the entire time of the occupation and didn't fall until 1941.  It looked rather ominous in some of the photos.  ~z

Terrible Rock.

There's also one named Strange, Leaning Rock.

I'm still blown away by the rich history of the place and the detailed, incredible architecture and the variety of bricks they made!

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" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
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Kim Brown
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PostTue Jun 15, 2021 10:15 am 
InFlight wrote:
The Log from the Sea of Cortez, - John Steinbeck, 1939

One quote that I liked...

"To name a thing has always been to make it familiar and therefore less dangerous to us. "Tree" the abstract may harbor some evil until it has a name, but once having a name one can cope with it."

Among my favorite authors. The Log from the Sea of Cortez has some beautiful text; descriptions! Isn't that the which is dedicated to "Ed Ricketts, who knows why, or should." I love that.

I read Cannery Row, Sweet Thursday, and Tortilla Flat every year, seems like.

If you haven't read Short Reign of Pippi IV, do. It's hilarious, though some of it goes over my head because I am not familiar with the politics of the time. It would be even more hilarious if I did.

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" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
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grannyhiker
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PostWed Jun 16, 2021 9:36 am 
Recently read:
Thaddeus Stevens: Civil War Revolutionary, Fighter for Racial Justice, by Bruce Levine.  About a man who was not only ahead of his time but in many ways ahead of our time, too.

Currently reading a detour from my usual area of interest, the American Civil War:
The Red Prince:  John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, by Helen Carr.  I've been collecting DVDs of Shakespeare's plays, and of course John of Gaunt has a prominent role in Richard II.  (He dies in Act II, but of course his descendants, starting with Henry IV, had a pivotal role in English history down through the Stuart kings and queens and beyond.) So far, I'm really enjoying this well-written biography.

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May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.--E.Abbey
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reststep
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PostWed Jun 16, 2021 9:50 am 
Kim Brown wrote:
Among my favorite authors.

Been awhile since I have read Steinbeck but I liked "Travels with Charley:In Search of America"

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"The mountains are calling and I must go." - John Muir
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Kim Brown
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PostWed Jun 16, 2021 10:49 am 
Book It Repertory did Travels with Charley on stage. Charley was a guy dressed in a poodle costume.

Several times on this site I had mentioned that Steinbeck writes about dripping or running water sounding like human voices. He does that in Travels with Charley his first night in the camper during the rain. I love that.

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" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
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olderthanIusedtobe
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PostWed Jun 16, 2021 3:17 pm 
A little bit into "Death on the Nile."  I read one of Christie's earliest Poirot novels a while ago.  It didn't do much for me, but I thought I'd try one of the more well known stories.  It's early, but it's not grabbing me.  Setting all the characters up, but mostly it's snooty British society people gossiping about other people.

I am looking forward to the upcoming latest theatrical version.  It's already been pushed back from '20 to '21 to now '22.  It might not ever get released at this rate.  It's got a nice ensemble cast, but I'm most excited about Emma Mackey, who I discovered on a Netflix series and now I'm obsessed with.

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olderthanIusedtobe
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PostThu Jun 17, 2021 2:03 pm 
Death on the Nile is picking up a bit.  Moving the setting from England to Egypt has helped, as well as several of the principal characters interacting w/ Poirot.



I'm a bit confused about some of the casting choices for the upcoming film.  Gal Gadot is a lovely woman, but the character she is portraying is only 20 in the novel.  She doesn't come close to passing for 20, and the character's age is actually fairly important because she's an heiress who hasn't come into her full inheritance yet.  Emma Mackey and Gadot's characters are supposed to be contemporaries, and there is an 11 year age difference between the 2 actresses.  Hollywood math...one of the dumbest things in the world.

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olderthanIusedtobe
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PostSat Jun 19, 2021 6:01 pm 
I think I can conclude I prefer Sherlock Holmes stories to Hercule Poirot, but a very wide margin.

I pushed thru it because it's a library book and I wanted to return it before I have to go out of town.  It got very convoluted, there were about a dozen red herrings, but it turns out the very first thought I had early in the book proved to be correct.  I never read "Murder on the Orient Express," but saw the recent film version.  Some similarities, you gather a group of people in a confined area, pretty much everybody has a motive to be the killer, throw it in a blender.

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