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Bedivere
Why Do Witches Burn?



Joined: 25 Jul 2008
Posts: 7464 | TRs | Pics
Location: The Hermitage
Bedivere
Why Do Witches Burn?
PostSun Aug 24, 2008 8:57 pm 
Only one picture and no time to writeup a full report for now.  It's late, work starts early, and there's a fair amount of post-processing to be done.  More to come.


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wildernessed
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wildernessed
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PostMon Aug 25, 2008 7:37 am 
Nice, I can't wait to see your pics. Nice shot of Red, Chiwawa, Fortress, and Glacier. up.gif  up.gif

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Bedivere
Why Do Witches Burn?



Joined: 25 Jul 2008
Posts: 7464 | TRs | Pics
Location: The Hermitage
Bedivere
Why Do Witches Burn?
PostMon Aug 25, 2008 9:44 pm 
Thanks!

So, this is going to be an installment TR, one day for each new post, beginning with Friday today.  Just don't have time to do it all at once.

First, a couple dumb details - I just recently took the plunge into digital photography and this is only the second hiking trip I've been on with my new camera (well, new to me), a Nikon D200.  It's taking some getting used to.  One important thing I discovered on this trip is having the color mode and saturation cranked all the way up as recommended on Ken Rockwell's site works pretty good until you put a polarizer on the end of the lens.  Adding the polarizer just makes the greens overpowering in most shots.  Grass and trees look almost like neon,  and even mid-tones in normal shots take on a greenish cast.  I've had to retouch most of these photos in Photoshop to tone the greens down to something that looks close to natural.  Also, shot everything in RAW format and Nikon's crappy conversion software takes FOREVER to write the files out as a .tif file so my ancient copy of Photoshop can open them.  This is all contributing to how long it's taking to get the photos done and uploaded.  This will also be the last TR I post using Photobucket.  I hate how you cannot sort the pictures by filename and how it restricts you to a maximum 800 pixel width photo.  Looks like flickr is the next best option, but any other suggestions/recommendations for free photo hosting appreciated.

Okay, that out of the way, let the TR begin.

With a two day weather window for Friday and Saturday, I set out with the goal of climbing both Mt. Fernow and Seven Fingered Jack from a base camp at the small, unnamed lake at approximately 7400 feet on the West shoulder of SFJ. Sunday would be returning to the car, so I wasn't too concerned with whether it would be raining or not.  As you will see in tomorrow's update, climbing SFJ didn't happen, but today I'll simply chronicle Friday's journey to setup said base camp.

Jack and I arrived at the Phelps Creek trailhead at about 11 AM and got in line...

Holy cow there are a lot of cars!
Holy cow there are a lot of cars!

The storm of the previous two days, with it's low snow levels definitely left it's mark.

Fresh snow on SFJ and Maude.
Fresh snow on SFJ and Maude.

On the way up the trail I simply couldn't resist documenting this.  The forests are going to be very different in the near future.

So long mid-elevation East slope forests, it was nice knowing you.
So long mid-elevation East slope forests, it was nice knowing you.

I banged out the 3.5 miles or so to the Leroy Basin trail in right about 1hr 10min.  Stopped for a breather and a water refill and talked to Bob and Tim, two fellas joining the wagon train up into the basin.  They really liked Jack and he seemed to take a shine to them.  Said they'd be climbing SFJ and Maude over the weekend so figured I'd probably run into them again, but never did.

falls and cairn on lower Leroy Basin trail.
falls and cairn on lower Leroy Basin trail.
I just like the colors and patterns in this shot.
I just like the colors and patterns in this shot.
High peaks holding fresh snow still at 2PM.
High peaks holding fresh snow still at 2PM.

Oh, and did I mention the mosquitoes?  No?  Well, that's because there weren't any!  Hallelujah!  After reading all the accounts of the horrid dessication suffered by numerous hikers on this board over the last week, I was fully expecting to be choking on clouds of the little pests, but they were simply not an issue.  I got two mosquito bites the entire trip, and never put on any bug spray.  Seeing as I'm the kind of person who's usually surrounded by a cloud of them while the people standing next to me go relatively un-harrassed, that's saying something.

Anyway, gloating over...

At about 2:30 from the car; "The Seven Fingers of Jack" or, "Seven Fingered Jack Rears it's Pointy Head."
At about 2:30 from the car; "The Seven Fingers of Jack" or, "Seven Fingered Jack Rears it's Pointy Head."
Jack searching for chipmunks while I take a lunch break in the upper basin.
Jack searching for chipmunks while I take a lunch break in the upper basin.
Looking up at the first pitch of three that would take me up to the ridgeline at 7600 ft.
Looking up at the first pitch of three that would take me up to the ridgeline at 7600 ft.
Looking back down on upper Leroy Basin.
Looking back down on upper Leroy Basin.
I just really like Larches.
I just really like Larches.
Cool rock buttresses on the SW shoulder of SFJ.
Cool rock buttresses on the SW shoulder of SFJ.
After a lot of sweating, the ridgeline is finally in sight.  My route would take me over the ridge just above the snowpatch in the upper left, just to the left of where the shadow begins.
After a lot of sweating, the ridgeline is finally in sight.  My route would take me over the ridge just above the snowpatch in the upper left, just to the left of where the shadow begins.
This is just one of those things that makes me go "hmmmm."  Obviously the smaller rock slid down snow and was deposited on top of the larger one as the snow melted away.  But, how long ago?  Did it happen last winter, or 50 winters ago?
This is just one of those things that makes me go "hmmmm."  Obviously the smaller rock slid down snow and was deposited on top of the larger one as the snow melted away.  But, how long ago?  Did it happen last winter, or 50 winters ago?
Those guys had a very scenic camp spot. Ran into two of their party atop Mt. Fernow on Saturday.
Those guys had a very scenic camp spot. Ran into two of their party atop Mt. Fernow on Saturday.
Cresting the ridge, this was the first view of "my" little lake.  Not horseshoe shaped at all like the USGS map shows it.
Cresting the ridge, this was the first view of "my" little lake.  Not horseshoe shaped at all like the USGS map shows it.
Jack glissading down the steep snow patch to the lake.  He was having a ball, had amazing control on that steep, hard snow.  I would have been biting my nails as I crossed it if I wasn't afraid to take my hands off my ski poles.
Jack glissading down the steep snow patch to the lake.  He was having a ball, had amazing control on that steep, hard snow.  I would have been biting my nails as I crossed it if I wasn't afraid to take my hands off my ski poles.

Here I demonstrate restraint and do not post the first of many pics of Glacier Peak I took on this trip...  Don't worry, the ones you will see are better anyway.

The reward for a long day's toil.  Thanks Jack!
The reward for a long day's toil.  Thanks Jack!
Jack's too tuckered out to care much about having his new boots on.
Jack's too tuckered out to care much about having his new boots on.
The setting sun on my little camp.
The setting sun on my little camp.
Mt. Rainier in the last of the light.
Mt. Rainier in the last of the light.
Neat reflection.  Dang, I really need a wider angle lens.
Neat reflection.  Dang, I really need a wider angle lens.
G'night mister sun.
G'night mister sun.
Obligatory tent shot.
Obligatory tent shot.
More neat reflections.
More neat reflections.

Well, that's that.  It got dark, I tried to take some star shots, none of them came out, I went to bed.  More tomorrow!

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Movenhike
\m/..mmmmetal\m/



Joined: 16 Apr 2007
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Movenhike
\m/..mmmmetal\m/
PostMon Aug 25, 2008 11:16 pm 
Nice

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Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot



Joined: 29 Jan 2007
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Matt
Tea, Earl Grey, Hot
PostMon Aug 25, 2008 11:24 pm 
Great little tarn you found.  Looking forward to the rest of the report.

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“As beacons mountains burned at evening.” J.R.R. Tolkien
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puzzlr
Mid Fork Rocks



Joined: 13 Feb 2007
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puzzlr
Mid Fork Rocks
PostWed Aug 27, 2008 2:01 am 
Waiting to see more! The photos are looking good after your processing.

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peltoms
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peltoms
Member
PostWed Aug 27, 2008 3:16 am 
Good sunset shot and the shot of peaks holding new snow. biggrin.gif

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MikeBeebe
Seeking the Ur



Joined: 05 Aug 2008
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MikeBeebe
Seeking the Ur
PostWed Aug 27, 2008 8:17 am 
I sympathize with your .tif -> PS issue; I'm still using a copy of 5 and RAW processing didn't start until 6. However, I've had a lot of luck with Picasa 2, which is Google's free photo processing software. It's not PS, but it's good for quick fixes and handles RAW natively.

http://picasa.google.com/

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Bedivere
Why Do Witches Burn?



Joined: 25 Jul 2008
Posts: 7464 | TRs | Pics
Location: The Hermitage
Bedivere
Why Do Witches Burn?
PostWed Aug 27, 2008 10:32 pm 
Thanks for the comments everyone!

As for it being a Tarn vs. a lake, has the distinction been debated around here?  In my book that was a lake.  Too deep and big to be a Tarn, but what do I know?  To paraphrase what someone said recently in another trip report, I've seen smaller and uglier pools of water referred to as lakes.

I'm using a copy of Photoshop 5.5 that I acquired back when I worked at Adobe Systems.  It handles RAW files, but the Nikon Raw is a proprietary format and the files all have a .NEF extension.  If you change them to .RAW Photoshop will open them but the file is nothing but gray streaks.

I was just too tired to finish this yesterday.  Kept falling asleep at the keyboard, literally...

So, to finish this off, finally:

Saturday morning dawned bright & mostly clear.  I overslept but that didn't make any difference to the outcome of the day.

Buck Mt. in the morning.
Buck Mt. in the morning.
Buck to Chiwawa, and everything in between.
Buck to Chiwawa, and everything in between.

At this point I had a decision to make.  I was still thinking I would be able to climb both peaks in a day. After all, Fernow is only about a mile as the crow flies from my camp.  How long could it take to drop 400 feet then regain 2000 feet in what would probably work out to about two miles by the time the angle of the slope and the variations from a straight line were added in?

So, which peak would I tackle first?  My logic said tackle the most difficult and unkown choice first - Fernow.  That way if I wasn't able to get back in time to get to SFJ, no biggie.  SFJ is easy enough from Leroy basin, I'll just come back some weekend and get it then.  This proved to be the right decision, as that mile to Fernow turned out to be quite a bit more of a challenge than I anticipated.

Looking down the chute you take to get down from the lake.  You have to go around the base of the cliffs at the right of this pic, about a 400 ft. elevation loss.
Looking down the chute you take to get down from the lake.  You have to go around the base of the cliffs at the right of this pic, about a 400 ft. elevation loss.

That initial chute set the stage for the rest of the day - very loose and steep.  I was hoping for lots of fields of big boulders.  Steep fields of 1-4 ft. diameter boulders are actually fairly friendly.  The boulders don't move around much and you're not constantly fighting to keep your footing from slipping and sliding out from under you.  Unfortunately, the terrain was almost all steep, loose scree and that's slow and tiring work.  Combine that with not-so-smart route choices that kept me on the steeper slopes a good part of the way up, and things ended up taking a lot longer and burning a lot more calories than I anticipated.

Jack crossing a small area of nice, stable boulders.
Jack crossing a small area of nice, stable boulders.
From the base of the rock outcropping the middle part of the route was plainly visible.
From the base of the rock outcropping the middle part of the route was plainly visible.

What you can't see in that picture and I never took any pics of it was the large bowl/basin behind that pyramid shaped moraine which constitutes the head of the Big Creek valley.  I thought it would be wise to maintain as much elevation as possible, so traversed around the edge of the basin to my right in the above pic rather than drop to the bottom and go straight across.  That was a bad choice, it cost a lot of time and energy. Would have been far less work to just go straight across and back up, so that's the way I came back.

The bottom of the basin and the cool looking little glacial melt pond.  If the glaciers had done just a bit more scouring there'd be a nice lake here.
The bottom of the basin and the cool looking little glacial melt pond.  If the glaciers had done just a bit more scouring there'd be a nice lake here.
The ubiquitous Glacier Peak.  The lighting was just too good not to take this pic...
The ubiquitous Glacier Peak.  The lighting was just too good not to take this pic...
Looking back down into the basin from the other side, above a nice flat shelf that had a nice stream and some snow in it, and probably a good place to camp, too.
Looking back down into the basin from the other side, above a nice flat shelf that had a nice stream and some snow in it, and probably a good place to camp, too.
Eye candy along the way.
Eye candy along the way.
Looking up through the shelf area.  Climbing up through this took some energy but the slope was steeper and looser farther to the left.
Looking up through the shelf area.  Climbing up through this took some energy but the slope was steeper and looser farther to the left.
A film of pretty, sparkly green crystals.  I wonder what that mineral is?
A film of pretty, sparkly green crystals.  I wonder what that mineral is?

Once above the steep area in the picture with the route outline there is a relatively level shelf.  Relatively.  There's a broad snow field in the bottom of this shelf but did I take that route like the other folks who climbed Fernow that day?  No, of course not.   Again, my brain was stuck in "gain altitude, maintain altitude, do NOT lose altitude" mode so I traversed along the steep slope on the East side of this flat area.  Another dumb, time consuming move.

One of the many crazy rock spires and needles in the area.
One of the many crazy rock spires and needles in the area.
The view to the North from about the 8600 ft. level on the Fernow's West side.  Lake 6466 in the lower left with Dumbbell Mt. above it, and a peekaboo view of Mt. Baker in the distance.
The view to the North from about the 8600 ft. level on the Fernow's West side.  Lake 6466 in the lower left with Dumbbell Mt. above it, and a peekaboo view of Mt. Baker in the distance.

Finally, about 4.5 hours after leaving camp I made the summit.  Just as I was preparing to ascend the last, steep pitch on the summit block two guys who I'd run into the day before on the way up to my camp were coming down.  They were part of the party camped on that scenic knob above Leroy Basin.  They said the other party members had opted to climb SFJ that day instead.

View to the East from the summit - Maude and the remains of the Entiat glacier.
View to the East from the summit - Maude and the remains of the Entiat glacier.
Looking down the Entiat valley.  The fire of a year or two ago really did a number on the trees.
Looking down the Entiat valley.  The fire of a year or two ago really did a number on the trees.
Looking North across Dumbbell Mt. and Bonanza Peak to a distant Mt. Baker and Mt. Shuksan.  What's that big peak in the middle?
1 label
Looking North across Dumbbell Mt. and Bonanza Peak to a distant Mt. Baker and Mt. Shuksan.  What's that big peak in the middle?

You may notice from the above pics that quite a few high clouds had rolled in.  I was concerned that this was the leading edge of the front predicted to come in on Sunday and that it was coming in ahead of schedule. Still, nothing really threatening on the horizon so figured I'd make it back to camp before it rained.

While relaxing and eating lunch on the summit, I heard rocks falling just below and looked over the edge to see a fellow climbing up, only about 40 feet below.  His name was Franklin and I'd seen him with a female companion and a Golden Retriever in the morning as they traversed across the slope above "my" lake.  Apparently his companion had elected not to summit the Mt. and remained on the snow field below.  They had come by what sounded like a very difficult route and despite having a head start on me, I beat Franklin to the top by a good half hour.  He said they'd had to belay the dog across some really steep sections...

Franklin gladly agreed to take this picture of me & Jack on the summit.
Franklin gladly agreed to take this picture of me & Jack on the summit.

For those who may be curious, Jack had no trouble at all with any part of the route except the last pitch to the summit.  There were three moves that required too much extension for him, he just couldn't reach. That and this was only the second time I'd asked him to climb anything really steep and the first time he'd been on a trip of this length.  However, all I had to do was get his front paws up to where they needed to be then give him a boost from behind and he climbed right up those sections.  He had no problems down-climbing anything.  Was a little hesitant to head straight down the steepest sections but all I had to do was stand at the bottom and encourage him and he came right down them like a glossy black Mt. goat.  I also took his boots off for this section as he obviously got better traction without them.

Cool bright red lichen on the summit of Fernow.  That rock looks like some kind of alien head with a lichen goatee and comb-over.
Cool bright red lichen on the summit of Fernow.  That rock looks like some kind of alien head with a lichen goatee and comb-over.

I may not always make the best route decsions, but I like to think I can learn from my mistakes.  I took the easier and more direct routes on the way back.

Jack looking down the big snowfield on the West side of Fernow.
Jack looking down the big snowfield on the West side of Fernow.
Summit spires of Fernow covered in colorful lichens.
Summit spires of Fernow covered in colorful lichens.
High above the head of Big Creek valley, the little glacial pond and the big pyramid shaped Moraines could be seen. I took the route across the bottom of the basin this time and checked out the pond.
High above the head of Big Creek valley, the little glacial pond and the big pyramid shaped Moraines could be seen. I took the route across the bottom of the basin this time and checked out the pond.
On the way down through the heather steps area I saw this patch of low growing blueberries that were already turning color.
On the way down through the heather steps area I saw this patch of low growing blueberries that were already turning color.
Yellow flowers near the bottom of the Big Creek basin.
Yellow flowers near the bottom of the Big Creek basin.
The remnants of the glacier at the head of the Big Creek valley.
The remnants of the glacier at the head of the Big Creek valley.
Glacial melt pond.  Turquoise water in the middle, green algae around the edges.
Glacial melt pond.  Turquoise water in the middle, green algae around the edges.
Jack takes a breather next to a long ago once-used fire pit.  Why would anyone build a fire pit here?  There's not a comfortable place to sit or lay down anywhere within 500 feet of here.
Jack takes a breather next to a long ago once-used fire pit.  Why would anyone build a fire pit here?  There's not a comfortable place to sit or lay down anywhere within 500 feet of here.
Shadows tell a story.
Shadows tell a story.

I made one more bad route choice at this point.  Rather than going around the South side of the largest pyramidal moraine and gaining the flat ground on the other side, I went around the North side which was a more direct line to the base of the cliffs that I needed to get around.  I'd read a description of the route that said "No crossing of the morain is required" and wondered why that would be a bad thing.  Well, I found out.  That moraine is a very hard, very compacted, very slippery conglomeration of sand and gravel with very steep sides.  It took a lot of effort to not slip and slide down it with every step.

Finally, though, I made it to the other side, gained some relatively flat ground that consisted of large boulders and made good time to the base of the cliffs where I noticed that Jack had lost one of his boots.  I retraced my route back to the edge of the moraine but never found it.  Oh well, hopefully it fell down some crack between boulders and no one will ever see it again.

As I approached my camp, finally, 9.5 hours after leaving it, the sun was getting close to setting, making for two more good pictures.

Glacier Peak, again...
Glacier Peak, again...
...and last light on Rainier.
...and last light on Rainier.

After drinking my last beer, eating a hot meal (Mountain House Rice & Chicken is pretty good), I slept like a rock.  The next morning I contemplated climbing SFJ on my way out, but the approaching clouds and rain in the not too distance convinced me my best bet was to just pack up and get out.

Rainier with some kind of funky triple lenticular action.
Rainier with some kind of funky triple lenticular action.
A pic of the crazy rock formations just above the lake.
A pic of the crazy rock formations just above the lake.
Rain approaching.
Rain approaching.
Jack on the climb to the ridge.  Despite him accompanying me yesterday, he was just as full of energy as always this day.
Jack on the climb to the ridge.  Despite him accompanying me yesterday, he was just as full of energy as always this day.
The typical balloon.  Yep, the *balloon* is biodegradeable.  But what about the ribbon and the plastic bracelet it's tied to?
The typical balloon.  Yep, the *balloon* is biodegradeable.  But what about the ribbon and the plastic bracelet it's tied to?
This is why Jack's pack, despite being used only twice, is falling apart at the seams.
This is why Jack's pack, despite being used only twice, is falling apart at the seams.

And that's the end of the photgraphic evidence.  I beat it down out of Leroy basin in record time, using my ski poles like ski poles I hopped and flew over obstacles and let gravity do it's thing.  It took me 4 hours to get from the Leroy Basin/Phelps creek trailhead up to the ridge on Friday, it took under 2 hours to get back down.  At the trail intersection I stopped to wash off the sweat and dust in the creek and marvelled at the steady stream of people marching back to the trailhead, most of them with young children from toddlers to 10 year olds in tow.  Spider Meadow must've been an absolute zoo the last couple of days, I felt sorry for the resident marmots.

My goal at this point was to beat the 1:10 it had taken me to get from the car to this point, and I did it handily.  Back at the car in 0:58, passing people every few minutes, and meeting quite a few people heading in including more groups with small children.  Hey, haven't you folks checked the weather report, or even looked at the sky?

Because of my rapid pace I was once again steaming hot by the time I reached my car so I drove down the road 'til I found a side road that led down to near a secluded spot on the Chiwawa river.  A log jam with an obliging sand bar afforded me a nice, if brief swim in the chilly waters.  Just as I was getting out of the river the rain started.

And that, as they say, is that unless you really want to hear about the drive home...   shakehead.gif

Thanks for reading, hope you enjoyed it, comments welcome!    biggrin.gif   cool.gif  cheers.gif

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wildernessed
viewbagger



Joined: 31 Oct 2004
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wildernessed
viewbagger
PostThu Aug 28, 2008 7:04 am 
up.gif Great TR and pics, I've seen the routes coming in from that way, but not a TR on that approach.

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GaliWalker
Have camera will use



Joined: 10 Dec 2007
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GaliWalker
Have camera will use
PostThu Aug 28, 2008 8:53 am 
Extremely enjoyable report and (despite your issues with conversion) some really lovely shots.

I also have to say that Jack is one handsome dog.

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'Gali'Walker => 'Mountain-pass' walker
bobbi: "...don't you ever forget your camera!"
Photography: flickr.com/photos/shahiddurrani
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seattlehikertoo
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seattlehikertoo
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PostThu Aug 28, 2008 9:14 pm 
Simply spectacular! There really isn't any other way to say it up.gif

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AttemPT
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AttemPT
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PostFri Aug 29, 2008 8:44 pm 
Love baggin a peak with my dog. Thanks for the extensive TR.

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CRoberts
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CRoberts
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PostSat Oct 10, 2009 9:00 pm 
Hey...I think I saw you two on my way down from Maude that same weekend...I had the aussie pup on the way out...

Thanks for the TR...I plan on going back up a couple weekends from now to go for 7FJ and Fernow this time around.

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Layback
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Layback
Mariner's Fanatic!!!
PostSat Oct 10, 2009 9:50 pm 
Good stuff Willie.  The D200 seems to be treating you great.   up.gif

FWIW I really like LightRoom for jpeg conversion and quick and dirty edits.  It's relatively cheap compared to PS and it's a great workflow tool.

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