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RodF
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PostSat Dec 31, 2011 11:03 am 
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Olympic National Forest published a series of Recreational Guides in 1936 (based on maps drawn in 1935).   In 1935, Olympic NF reported it had completed 962 miles of trails, 109 campgrounds, including 90 overnight shelters. 

This trail, campsite and shelter system originated in the 1929 "Olympic Forest Recreation Plan" by USFS regional forest planner Fred W. Cleator, which it was ready to implement when the "New Deal" CCC manpower and WPA funding became available in the 1930s. 

Two years later, in 1938, Olympic National Park would be created from the Mount Olympus National Monument and a substantial part of Olympic National Forest.

Snow Peaks Recreation Area (Northeast Olympics)
Snow Peaks Recreation Area, map
Snow Peaks Recreation Area, map
Snow Peaks Recreation Area, text
Snow Peaks Recreation Area, text

Noteworthy: Lookouts at Mt. Townsend, Mt. Zion, Blue Mtn., Hurricane Hill, Dodger Point.  Dosewallips Road under construction.

Hood Canal Recreation Area (Southeast Olympics)
Hood Canal Recreation Area, map
Hood Canal Recreation Area, map
Hood Canal Recreation Area, text
Hood Canal Recreation Area, text

Noteworthy: Satsop River shelter, possible Vance Creek shelter?,  Anderson Butte and Mt. Jupiter lookouts


Quinault Lake Recreation Area (Southwest Olympics)
Lake Quinault Recreation Area, map
Lake Quinault Recreation Area, map
Lake Quinault, text
Lake Quinault, text

Noteworthy: Harlow Bottom, Three Lakes, Three Prune, Wolf Bar, Francis Creek, Graves Creek Basin, Campbell shelters; Kloochman Rock, Lone Mtn., Cook Creek Tree and Burnt Peak lookouts.
Source: National Archives, Pacific-Alaska Region, Seattle, Record Group 95 USFS Region 6, Box 67, file Olympic Guide Folders 1923-1936.

Quinault Lake Recreation Area, map
Quinault Lake Recreation Area, map
Quinault Lake Recreation Guide
Quinault Lake Recreation Guide

Lake Crescent Recreation Area (Northwest Olympics)
Lake Crescent Recreation Area, map
Lake Crescent Recreation Area, map
Lake Crescent Recreation Area, text
Lake Crescent Recreation Area, text

Noteworthy: Bear Creek shelter (north of Snider RS, now on FS30 road), Hyas shelter on north Snider-Jackson Trail, Kloshe Nanitch and Twin lookouts.  North Fork Sol Duc Trail shown as completed to Boulder Lake (it was never completed after work stopped in 1940).

Olympics Trail Riders Trip

Trail Riders Trip, map
Trail Riders Trip, map
Olympic Trail Riders Trip, text
Olympic Trail Riders Trip, text

Noteworthy: Lake Success shelter, Dose Meadows shelter, Promise Creek Trail and hope (in the text) trail crews will complete a "high route along the base of Mount Seattle" to Lake Beauty.  Also remarkable that this entire route had been improved to stock standards, which it had not been five years earlier... and alas much of it is not today!
(Trail Riders trips were sponsored by American Forestry Association, a national nonprofit which organized large group rides in National Forests across the US.)
Note added May, 2014: improved scans posted for 11x14" prints.
Source: National Archives, Pacific-Alaska Region, Seattle, Record Group 95 USFS Region 6, Box 67, file Olympic Trail Riders

Source of all, except as noted above: National Archives online public access.
All may be viewed or downloaded at this link.

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"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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reststep
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PostSat Dec 31, 2011 4:06 pm 
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Good find Rod.  up.gif

Snow Peaks Recreation Area.

I like it. I think we should bring that name back.

I wish they still ran the Seabeck-Brinnon ferry.  It would put me right in position to go hiking in the Snow Peaks Recreation Area.

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"The mountains are calling and I must go." - John Muir
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Phil
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PostSat Dec 31, 2011 11:15 pm 
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Great maps, thanks for posting!   Southeast Olys had some different things back then.
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RodF
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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 8:31 am 
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Quinault Lake Recreation Guide No. 17 added to the original posting above.  Found it in the National Archives at Sand Point yesterday, along with this interesting map:

Olympic National Forest Recreation Guide No. 24, 1936
1 label
Olympic National Forest Recreation Guide No. 24, 1936

The original image 2088 x 1557 pixels, 1.0 MB, may be viewed or downloaded at full resolution at this link.

It shows an interesting transitional configuration of the Skyline Trail, with the Finley Ridge, Tshletshy Creek, original Elip Creek and the then-new Big Creek Trail (on the route of the "old miner's path" from Irely Lake) all converging at Three Lakes, the Skyline under construction between Lake Beauty and Kimta Peak, and Promise Creek trail (which was always said to be difficult for stock) abandoned from the map.

The entire North Snider-Jackson trail shelter system is depicted: the Hyas, Sitkum, and South Fork Calawah shelters.  Hyas had a telephone and was about 1/2 mile east of the World War II Hyas Peak aircraft spotter lookout and later postwar fire lookout; it would have been used for fire patrols.

This is also one of the very few maps depicting Olympic shelter, a mile east of Olympus Guard Station.  Perhaps the old Lewis cabin was being used as a shelter?  Note added: no, photos show the shelter was a separate structure nearby in Lewis meadow.

Shelters depicted are Lillian, Hayes River, Chicago Camp, Idaho, Lake Angeles, Morse Creek, Deer Park, Camp Colonel, Gray Wolf, Falls, Gold Creek, Silver Creek, Camp Handy, Boulder, Ten Mile (Quilcene), Sink Lake, Gramm Creek?, Dose Meadows, Honeymoon Meadows, Camp Collins, Lower Lena Lake, Bear Creek, Big Log, Nine Stream, Spider Lake, Church Creek, Camp Riley, Neby and Baker Creek on the Middle Fork Satsop River, Canyon, West Fork Satsop, Upper Satsop Lake, East Fork Humptulips, West Fork Humptulips (Pete's Creek), Campbell, Graves Creek, Graves Creek Basin, Belview, Wolf Bar, Francis Creek, Sixteen Mile, Three Lakes, Three Prune, Tshletshy Basin, Sams River, Harlow Bottom, Pelton Creek, Mt. Tom, Happy Four, Olympic, Glacier Meadows, Fifteen Mile, Hyak, Twenty-One Mile, South Fork Calawah, Sitkum, Hyas, Bear Creek, Canyon Creek, Soleduck Park, Heart Lake, Boulder Lake... a total of 62 shelters.  If we add those also depicted in the other 1936 Recreation Guides (River (Dungeness), Roy Cr. cabin, Tunnel Creek, Dose Forks, Five Mile, Ten Mile (Duckabush), upper Duckabush, Elk Lake, Flapjack Lakes, Vance Creek?, Flapjack (Bogachiel). Deer Lake) that's 74 of the 90 which Olympic NF reported it had built by 1935.  Most of remainder were probably located near ranger stations or automobile campgrounds, so weren't separately depicted.

Source: National Archives, Pacific-Alaska Region, Seattle, RG-95 USFS Region 6, Box 56, file Recreation Guide Maps 1936.

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 12:30 pm 
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Harlow Bottom?

sure it isn't Bob Creek?

(I can't focus on the image when I try to blow it up.)

is that a trail going up to Lake Dilly? or just the drainage?

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RodF
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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 1:58 pm 
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Ski wrote:
Harlow Bottom?
sure it isn't Bob Creek?

Couldn't tell from this map, but look at the Quinault Recreation Guide No. 17 in the original posting above, and it shows Harlow Bottom shelter by name.  It also shows the full length of the Sams River trail, and the older  Sams River shelter at Camp Phillips.

Ski wrote:
is that a trail going up to Lake Dilly? or just the drainage?

Just the drainage.

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 2:53 pm 
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okay... that's odd... the Harlow brothers hunted elk in that area, and somewhere I recall mention of some "structure" erected there... my understanding was that the Bob Creek shelter was not a NFS or NPS built structure, and was erected much later...

here it is:

"The last place up the river that was inhabited at that time was a cabin where Bob McKee batched. It was two miles by trail above the Streaters' and a little above Spruce Bottom and across from where the Smith Place (homesteaded about 1924 by George Shaube) now stands. Later Earl Pettit built a cabin way up at Harlow Creek, where he trapped."
(Reminiscences of Harry J. Kittredge, homesteader on the Queets River as told to John M. Kauffmann, seasonal park ranger, November 1956)

(from another NPS document:)
"NOTE: Earl Pettit builds cabin at Harlow Creek after 1920's."

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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trestle
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PostFri Jan 06, 2012 6:45 pm 
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Thanks for posting these Rod. Snow Peaks is a great name, wish we could keep it somehow.

A quick glance notes the "Forest Plantations" next to the Quilcene River amongst the many other items already pointed out.

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PostSat Jan 07, 2012 8:29 pm 
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re: 1935 USGS Mount Olympus 15 minute topo:

The Jeffers Glacier is shown as "University Glacier"
From "Gods & Goblins - A Field Guide to Place Names in Olympic National Park" (© 1984 Smitty Parratt):
"It is possible that Jeffers Glacier was previously called University Glacier. Roy Muncaster (see Muncaster Mountain) and another unnamed University of Washington student expored the upper Queets Valley in 1914, ascending Mt. Olympus via the glacier. A year later, when Muncaster was traveling to Europe on the Lusitania the ship was sunk by a German U-Boat. The glacier may have been named for his alma mater. Confusion persists, however, as to whether University Glacier was the earlier name for Jeffers Glacier or for a spider-shaped glacial mass at the head of the West Fork of Paull Creek."

Saghalie Creek is shown as Sahale Creek
per Parratt, "Saghale" and "Sahale" are alternate spellings.

It would appear that Parratt never saw the 1935 map before his work went to print.

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostSun Jan 08, 2012 11:10 pm 
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Wonderful. Thanks for the maps.

The UW Digital Library has some great photos on file of the Trail Riders trip into the Olympics taken by Ashael Curtis with one being made into a "noteworthy" post card of Mt Duckabush.

Earl Pettit's cabin was indeed up Harlow Creek and one could find some remains in the 70's (Old crosscut saw and a melted clock!). It wasn't that far up and is marked on the older Metsker Maps for Jefferson County.
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RodF
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PostMon Jan 09, 2012 5:49 am 
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Note also that in these 1935 maps, the upper Queets Trail is shown crossing to the south bank of the Queets River, at a point about 2 miles above Harlow Bottom shelter!  It continues another 5 to 7 miles upriver, crossing Pelton Creek (shown) (and it would also cross Alta and Hee Hee Creeks, although not shown on the map) on the south and east bank.  This is the only map I've seen which shows the trail crossing to the south bank.

This appears to confirm what Ski wrote me in an e-mail:
ski wrote:
According to Gary Patton, and "Fred" (whose real name I never knew), there were remnants of "trail" on the SOUTH bank of the Queets between Alta and Kilkelly. Patton told me in 1989 that there were signs at Alta and Kilkelly Rapids. "Fred" claimed to have followed remants of "trail" down the south bank between Kilkelly and Alta while coming down from Lake Beauty. Patton also claimed to have found remnants of some "structure" up there along the south bank between Alta and Kilkelly. (metal stove pipe, metal remnants, cut wood).

So.... yeah.. I believe there might well be some "mystery" trail up there. I've never found it, but then I was trying to bushwhack up the south bank above Alta and ended up WAY the heck up on the ridge (several hundred feet above the river) working my way around blowdown.

The river meanders in its flood plain, and may have moved from one side of the valley to the other over the past 75 years.  The "current" 1990 USGS topo shows at RM 43.5 the river hard up against the base of a very steep mountainside on the east bank, with an abandoned meander.  It the river occupied this meander in the 1930s, it may have allowed a trail to continue on the east bank up to Kilkelly?

The 1930 USFS Olympic National Forest map shows the trail ending near Bob Creek (RM 36).

Jim Taplin's 1932 "Olympic Trail Guide" map (kindly posted online by Mace) shows the Queets Trail entirely on the north bank, extending past Pelton Shelter (depicted with a "T." indicating it is equipped with a telephone for fire reporting) and ending just past Kilkelly, across from "Hee Hee" (now Hee Haw) Creek, ~RM 46.

Unfortunately, the USGS Historic Map Collection does not have the 1935 Mount Christie quad online yet.  The USGS maps are more reliable than these.

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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PostMon Jan 09, 2012 1:15 pm 
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Quote:
The river meanders in its flood plain, and may have moved from one side of the valley to the other over the past 75 years.  The "current" 1990 USGS topo shows at RM 43.5 the river hard up against the base of a very steep mountainside on the east bank, with an abandoned meander.  It the river occupied this meander in the 1930s, it may have allowed a trail to continue on the east bank up to Kilkelly?

RM42-RM43
1 label
RM42-RM43

It's not "very steep". It's straight up and down. That is exactly the spot I was referring to in my quote above. Per Patton and "Fred", the trail was higher up on the ridge. Maybe I didn't get up high enough above Hee Hee.
I ended up on the ridge just east of what would be RM 43.5 - right where all those little brown lines get really close to each other.
smile.gif

I haven't seen the 1935 map of the portion you're talking about (between Harlow and Alta), but I have heard (somewhere) the trail was on the south bank there. (edit: that should be on the Bob Creek topo)

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostMon Jan 09, 2012 2:07 pm 
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Quote:
[Jim Taplin's 1932 "Olympic Trail Guide" map (kindly posted online by Mace) shows the Queets Trail entirely on the north bank, extending past Pelton Shelter (depicted with a "T." indicating it is equipped with a telephone for fire reporting) and ending just past Kilkelly, across from "Hee Hee" (now Hee Haw) Creek, ~RM 46.

okay, but if you look carefully at that map, you'll note it's way off insofar as exactly where the river is between Pelton and Saghalie... not even close... so it's kind of difficult to really make sense of it.

but: your statement right there now explains why I've found telephone insulators on trees way up the valley... I had previously thought the phone system only went up to Smith Place.

edit:
and the trail did go up past Pelton Creek Shelter... several hundred yards, as I recall, before you came to the "End of Trail" sign. from there it was a well-beaten path out to the gravel bar opposite the mouth of Alta.

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostTue Jul 09, 2013 1:08 pm 
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From: skimohawk@

To: Samuel

Subject: Re: upper, upper queets trail?

Date: Tue, 09 Jul 2013 15:58:45 -0400-Display Full headers

Hello Sam.
Nice to hear from you.
I've tried several times to find remnant of "trail" above Alta on the south bank. Wandered around up a bit past Hee Hee Creek looking for a piece of cut log or an orange tag. Dead-ended on a near-vertical slope about half a mile up from Hee Hee, about 200-300 feet above the river. Couldn't navigate over the 6-foot diameter blowdowns jackstrawed all over the hillside with a pack. Backtracked back down to Alta.
There's another source, Gary Patton (whom I first met up there in 1989) who reported "trail"above Alta on the south bank, as well as remnants of some sort of structure.

I somehow got your name mixed up, and thought you were "Fred".
There never was any "Fred". You are Sam.

I've asked the trails supervisor up at ONP about this, and went so far as to drive up to PA to look at an old archival map he found, but neither of us could find anything which indicated there may have been any "trail" along the south bank.

Rod Farlee of Sequim (RodF on nwhikers) dug up some old maps which show trail along the south bank, continuing up past Pelton and Alta.
Please take a look at THIS http://www.nwhikers.net/forums/viewtopic.php?p=772832#772832 post on nwhikers.net.
I might have some old emails which might shed further light on this, but I believe the content of the above-cited post is about all we really know.

If you're planning on going up above Pelton, bear in mind most of those who've been able to get up farther have worked up the north bank. Mike MacFerrin (gobluehiker on nwhikers.net) said he stayed well back from the river and made good time up the north bank.

Every time I went up the north bank I pretty much stayed in the river, fording about every 300 feet, and hit a dead-end about midway between HeeHee and Kilkelly. Had I been farther back further progress might have been possible. The whole floodplain was jammed with blowdown and logjams down near the river. Hauling a pack up through that maze was damn near impossible.

As for "anything else of note": as far as we know, the road is open to the campground. I talked to Lee at Kalaloch yesterday on the phone. So far no reports on the trail. But then, the river's running at 1700 cfs right now, so there's still too much water in the ditch. USGS graph looks like it'll be down to about 1200 in about a week if the weather pattern holds steady.
There's going to be a hell of a tangle up about 4.5 miles, just as you come up that bench below Spruce Bottom. Big Hemlock split right on the trail- photo of it in one of my trip reports from last fall.

Crew worked the trail up to just shy of Paradise last summer. Put in new footbridges. Looks like ONP plans to abandon the trail above Paradise. My understanding is that the river must be forded at Paradise, then traverse up the middle of the channel a ways, and regain the trail above that. But then, there never really was much "trail" above that point- it's mostly just staying parallel to the channel back in the alder flats to Pelton.

One more note: at the end of the road, the river cut the bank back and there's a 20-foot vertical drop. Walk about 200 feet down the Sams Loop trail, cut off to the left, and break out on the gravel bar there to get down to the ford.

Best ford last few years has been about a hundred yards upstream from the mouth of Sams. Look for a big snag hanging out over the south bank (above that big boulder pool.)

I'm taking the liberty of posting this on nwhikers. Maybe we'll get some feedback from Gary or Mike or Rod or???

Again, nice to hear from you.

Brian

>   Hi Ski,
>
> I've run into you a few times in the Queets, in 1993 as I tried to find the tshleshy trail, again in 2002 on the main queets itself. Sometime in the past 5-7 years I emailed you about remnants of an old trail I found in 1994 up the slope aways above Alta creek on the Queets, that seemed to lead down from the rapids area. I'm planning a trip to the upper Queets in August, and was wondering if you ever went up there yourself looking for it?
>
>  Anything else of note happening in the Queets valley these days?
>
>   Sam

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostSun Jul 21, 2013 1:08 am 
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* edited for brevity * another little piece of a puzzle? *

Date: Sat, 20 Jul 2013 18:37:30 -0400
Subject: Re: upper, upper queets trail?
From: Sam
To: skimohawk@

Hi Brian,

Thanks for the wealth of info. The trail I found in 94 was def. on the east bank of the river, above Alta, upslope a few hundred feet. I found it after coming downriver from hee haw, at the point where the bottomland is pinched out by rapids. There were numerous cut logs, and my thoughts were that this was something official. It dropped down off the slopes and disappeared in an alder flat abit above alta. It may be nearly impossible to find going upriver, best to look around the rapids, where it may be located in a natural egress away from the pinched bottomlands. I'm still intrigued that you mentioned hearing tell of sign in that area from somebody in the past.

Sam

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* east bank at Alta is south bank of Queets

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Olympic NF 1935-1936 Recreation Guides
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