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elderbob
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PostTue Oct 23, 2012 4:39 pm 
http://www.windsox.us/1940_ONP_Map/1940_ONP_Map.html

Map and text sent to me by RodF

Interesting that it shows the old telephone lines.  RodF included list of shelters and lookouts at that time.

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Ski
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PostTue Oct 23, 2012 5:45 pm 
Rod:

-this one is showing a trail up to where Petit's cabin would have been.

-I cannot make out what it is written just to the left of where that trail to Petit's cabin branches off the main trail. elevation number? (514?)

-note your earlier (1936?) map showed the trail going over to the south bank just above Paradise Creek, this one shows it on the north bank to Pelton, then going over to the south bank just above Pelton and continuing up along the south bank up to the mouth of Hee Hee. (which is the way it was described to me by G. Patton in 1989)

-there's a falls worthy of note on Hee Haw? really?

-that mysterious one-mile piece of trail up above Service Falls isn't shown on this one.

-no "phone line dots" shown in the valley. I know the phone line went up to Smith Place, and I've found insulators on trees farther up the valley. of course, that would all have been well after 1940.

quite the find.
thank you, Rod and Elder Bob!

smile.gif

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RodF
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PostTue Oct 23, 2012 6:25 pm 
Ski wrote:
-I cannot make out what it is written just to the left of where that trail to Petit's cabin branches off the main trail. elevation number? (514?)

Yes, elevation 514.  The trail up Harlow Creek ends at a square box (cabin) marked PETIT, the Petit cabin also depicted on the Metsker map (which I'll post later).

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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PostTue Oct 23, 2012 8:31 pm 
you emailed me that Metsker map. I'm only seeing a blur there where you're seeing "PETIT".... when I try to enlarge the image with "zoom" it just gets fuzzier.
like Donovan suggested, I guess I'll have to invest in a GPS one of these days.

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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RodF
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PostTue Oct 23, 2012 9:18 pm 
No, right on the 1940 Olympic NP map Bob posted above, if you click on it to get the full resolution version, the cabin up Harlow Creek is labelled PETIT.

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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PostTue Oct 23, 2012 9:26 pm 
I believe you! maybe my eyeballs are going bad. at this end it's really blurry... like I said: I could barely make out the "514". the "Petit" notation is barely legible here at my end, but I got the general idea.... now the only problem is figuring out which one of those drainages is Harlow!
smile.gif

(*crazy part of it is: both Carl and Larry helped me on this one a few years ago, but I'll be damned if I can remember!)

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostWed Oct 24, 2012 11:33 am 
1898 map of western Jefferson County showing locations of original homesteads

(click the "maps" tab above for more treasures.)

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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RodF
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PostThu Oct 25, 2012 1:49 pm 
Ski wrote:
-no "phone line dots" shown in the valley. I know the phone line went up to Smith Place, and I've found insulators on trees farther up the valley. of course, that would all have been well after 1940.

For background, the 1930 Olympic National Forest map reads, on the reverse under "Forest Improvements", "The Forest Service has built 958 miles of trail, 613 miles of telephone line, and 18 trail shelters within the forest for administration, protection, and recreation."  It shows the Queets telephone line extending to Bob Creek shelter, plus a branch up to Kloochman Rock lookout.

Overhead phone line probably wasn't installed after 1940.  The phone line up the Queets either was missed from this map, or may already have been unmaintained?  The following is from the "Olympic Backcountry Study", NPS, January 1960, pages 22 to 24 (ONP archives OLYM-463).

Quote:
Communications

When the National Park Service took over from the Forest Service in 1938, phone lines (#9 overhead wire) were strung up most all watersheds, usually ending at road end ranger stations.  At certain shelters along the way phones were placed for emergency use.  However, one could call from Hoh Ranger Station to Port Angeles via Bogachiel Peak, Soleduck Ranger Station, north side of Lake Crescent, along Highway 101 to Little River, and over Little River Road to Port Angeles.  During the war years most of these lines were maintained primarily by help from the army who paid for servicing the Air Warning Stations.  However, this help ended in June of 1944.  The lines were then maintained by a few (3) rangers and their summer help.  In the late 1940's lack of interest in our back country plus lack of trained personnel started the downfall of our phone lines.  By February of 1953, only two (2) lines remained.  One 21 miles up the Elwha from Elwha Ranger Station to Hayes River and one 8-3/4 miles up the Hoh River from Hoh Ranger Station to Olympus Ranger Station.  These two lines have been maintained by trail personnel to the present date.

During the summer of 1956, a mountain climber died on Mount Olympus.  That fall a neoprene coated wire was laid on the ground from Olympus Ranger Station to Glacier Meadows with one extra phone to Elk Lake.  Nine miles of line were laid in six days by three men or two man days per mile.  This line has worked out very well.  Except for putting upu stronger wire over the snow slide areas in 1957, very little maintenance has been required.

This is the history of phone lines in Olympic National Park.  Most of the wire strung around the Park has been rolled up and disposed of.

One reason for letting the phone lines go was the increasing use of radio.  It was thought that radios would take the place of phone lines in the back country.  Because of (1) the high cost of installing and protecting any emergency radio installation in the back country, (2) the ability of every person to use telephones, (3) the cheapness of laying and maintaining an insulated ground wire, (4) the simple maintenance requirements of a telephone as against a radio (with a few instructions a field man can trace down and repair telephones but a radio not working would require trained personnel or a new radio), and (5) the need of back country emergency communications for fire or saving of lives, the committee recommends that ground (#17 neoprene coated wire) lines and phones be put in the following locations.

Graves Creek R.S. to Enchanted Valley, phones at Graves Creek R.S., O'Neil Creek, Enchanted Valley, distance 13 miles
Soleduck R. S. to Bogachiel Peak, phones at Soleduck R.S., Soleduck Falls, Deer Lake, Round Lake, Bogachiel Peak, 11 miles
Hayes River to Low Divide, phones at Chicago Camp, Low Divide, 11 miles
Deer Park to Three Forks, 5 miles
Dosewallips R.S. to Dose Meadows, phones at Dosewallips R.S., Dose Forks, Camp Marion or Bear Camp, Dose Meadows, 12 miles
Dose Forks to Anderson Pass Shelter, phones at Diamond Meadows, Anderson Pass, 9 miles
End Skokomish Road to Upper Duckabush, phones at Camp Pleasant, Nine Stream, Home Sweet Home, Upper Duckabush, 12 miles
Total = 22 phones, 73 miles

In addition, the existing #9 overhead wire should be replaced with the ground wire.  This would mean 30 more miles plus phones at Lillian and Mary's Falls on the Elwha and at Happy Four on the Hoh.  Thus, the grand total would be 25 phones and 103 miles of phone line.

The above phones and lines are recommended because of their location in areas of high travel or central locations to handle travel in several areas.  The phones and lines are easy to maintain once installed.

I don't know whether the Park ever laid all these ground lines.

The Thomas ceramic telephone insulators can still be spotted on many trails today.  Their color is one clue as to their age - the originals are white, while post-WWII ones are brown - to make them less prone to being spotted and shot at by vandals, according to retired Park maintenance supervisor Dave Colthorp.

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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RodF
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PostFri Nov 16, 2012 4:12 pm 
More on Olympic NP communications, excerpted from an interview of Jack Nattinger by Jacilee Wray in 2000.

Quote:
JW:  And so what did you do as a seasonal ranger in ’40?

JN:  In ’40? Same thing.  I mean you know, contact people that were coming through.  We kept the phone lines up in those days and we opened the trail.  Well we were there to open trail.  Actually we were opening trail in ’41 when the lightning struck and fixing phone lines.  That was part of your job when you first went to work.

JW:  How far did the phones go?  All the way?

JN:  Oh boy, the phones were all over.

JW:  To Chicago camp?

JN:  Oh they went clear up to the Low Divide and down to North Fork in the guard station.  In those days I can remember – well even in the, well when I came back in ’44 – I can remember calling from Olympic guard station to the chief ranger’s office here you see.

JW:  And were they like you crank it a certain number of times, so they would know who it was for?

JN:  Well, yeah they could ring you a certain number of rings.  But you just cranked it to get through to the operator in Port Angeles.

JW:  Oh and they’d connect you.  Did you have radios too?

JN:  Yeah, but they are not handy like they are now. They’d have these Silvertone, they’d call them Silvertone radios.   They weighed fifty pounds, and one of my first jobs when I got up there in ’38, when I was working with the trail crew on the Hoh River, we were staying in Olympus.  And so Charlie Lewis packed in from up the Hoh, he packed in  a Silvertone radio for Bogachiel Peak.  So another fellow and I carried the Silvertone radio up to Bogachiel Peak.  So they had radio contact too but they also had the telephone...

JW:  So was there a regular fire station at Bogachiel Peak, fire look out just like Dodger Point?

JN:  Yeah there was a lookout just like Dodger Point.  And they had it at Hurricane, at Deer Park. 

Jack Nat also resupplied and maintained the phone lines to the Aircraft Warning Service spotters at Hurricane Hill and Dodger Point lookouts and Low Divide Chalet in WWII.  Spotters were also stationed at Pyramid Peak, Kloochman Rock, Geodetic Hill and several sites on the coast, all with telephone lines for reporting.

Which would you rather pack - a portable telephone handset and climbing spikes, or an unreliable 50 pound radio?   smile.gif

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"of all the paths you take in life, make sure a few of them are dirt" - John Muir
"the wild is not the opposite of cultivated.  It is the opposite of the captivated” - Vandana Shiva
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