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DarkHelmet
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PostTue May 05, 2015 9:14 am 
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Wild Aurora
Wild Aurora

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patrick-sloan.com
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David K
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PostTue Jun 16, 2015 8:33 pm 
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Spider Glaicer June 2015-
Spider Glaicer June 2015-

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If you watch Jaws backwards its the touching story of a giant shark who pukes up so many people the town is forced to build a beach.
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Jackal
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PostSun Aug 16, 2015 9:07 am 
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Took students on a 3 day campout to the Olympic Penninsula. We thought we'd be the only ones on this hillside field looking at the Perseids and there were two other groups laying in the dark silence. (those are my students in the pics btw -- we weren't invasive on the others)

Stargazing1
Stargazing1
Stargazing2
Stargazing2

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jackmcleodphoto.com
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Jim Dockery
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PostTue Aug 18, 2015 11:25 am 
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Jackal, Nice work getting those kids out under the stars - I'm sure they'll never forget it up.gif  up.gif

Mt. Baker from Skyline Divide
Mt. Baker from Skyline Divide
Mt. Baker from Skyline Divide
Mt. Baker from Skyline Divide

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Bedivere
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PostTue Aug 18, 2015 10:16 pm 
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From a couple weeks ago at a lonely lake in the Pasayten:

DSC_6538-1 by Will Baker, on Flickr

DSC_6514-1-3 by Will Baker, on Flickr

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Jackal
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PostThu Aug 20, 2015 7:35 am 
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Pilchuck mid-July.

Pilchuck Starry Night!
Pilchuck Starry Night!

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jackmcleodphoto.com
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Jackal
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PostThu Aug 20, 2015 8:41 am 
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Mt Baker

Baker&Colman-MilkyWay
Baker&Colman-MilkyWay

I had a Milky Way challenge I wonder if any of you have figured out. I took 6 vertical shots in a row to make a panorama. Here are three of them.


When put together the image was fractured because the Milky Way is at different angles in each of the six pictures -- not an arc. The only way I could effectively merge the images to get the arc was like this:

Baker-MilkyWay-pan
Baker-MilkyWay-pan

Anyone know what the solution is? Take a whole lot more images than 6?

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Jim Dockery
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PostMon Sep 14, 2015 8:30 am 
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Jackal, if you have Photoshop you could try warping that image to pull it down into a more normal view, but that would be tough. All things being equal more shots with lots of overlap is better, but pano software has a very hard time with night sky images in any case (of course the stars are moving in each shot).

When I started taking these I couldn't figure out what the faint glow behind Shuksan could be, but when I checked the first shot in the camera I was very happy to find the aurora!

Shuksan Dusk
Shuksan Dusk
Shuksan Aurora
Shuksan Aurora
Shuksan Aurora
Shuksan Aurora
Shuksan Aurora
Shuksan Aurora
Shuksan Aurora
Shuksan Aurora
Shuksan Aurora
Shuksan Aurora

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kite
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PostMon Sep 14, 2015 9:43 am 
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Jim amazing captures smile.gif

up.gif  up.gif  up.gif  up.gif
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mike
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PostMon Sep 14, 2015 11:11 am 
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Jackal wrote:
Anyone know what the solution is? Take a whole lot more images than 6?

looks like you did the stitch with PS and use a Mac. No more shots should be required if you got enough overlap to get control points.  What you need to try is different projections. I would try "cylindrical" first. But I'm not familiar with what is available either with new PS nor with MacOS. I use hugin. give the Mac version a try.
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Jackal
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PostTue Sep 15, 2015 4:45 am 
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Jim, what a prize to capture the aurora. Those are sweet shots.

Jim and Mike, thanks for the star pano tips. I tried different projections but have concluded there just needs to be more overlap, hence more pictures. I used a 14mm lens so wouldn't want to go any wider. I'll try Hugin though.

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Jim Dockery
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PostMon Oct 19, 2015 12:39 pm 
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A bit of luck with this one - one of many in a late night - early morning time-lapse from the top of Pugh. I thought the moon would ruin my star pictures, but instead it provided interest.

Moon over Glacier Pk.
Moon over Glacier Pk.

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gb
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PostMon Oct 19, 2015 1:15 pm 
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Jackal wrote:
Mt Baker

Baker&Colman-MilkyWay
Baker&Colman-MilkyWay

I had a Milky Way challenge I wonder if any of you have figured out. I took 6 vertical shots in a row to make a panorama. Here are three of them.


When put together the image was fractured because the Milky Way is at different angles in each of the six pictures -- not an arc. The only way I could effectively merge the images to get the arc was like this:

Baker-MilkyWay-pan
Baker-MilkyWay-pan

Anyone know what the solution is? Take a whole lot more images than 6?

I've gotten somewhat into shooting MW/Northern Light images this summer. What I've learned is that the way those with the best images do it is to use a Star Tracker - there are light weight options out there like the Vixen Polarie. Just google Star Tracker B&H and you can get prices and specs as well as reviews.

The images are combined in Photoshop or in Deep Star Tracker and then a second landscape image is combined with the Milky Way collage in Photoshop. The best website demonstrating this is Clarkvision.

I'll certainly try this next summer but whether I will do it often while backpacking is another question. You need a sturdy tripod, two ballheads, and the Star Tracker. This kind of defeats the purpose of going with lighter camera gear in the first place. I have the Olympus EM-1, 24-80 zoom, the Panasonic 70-200 zoom, and the F1.8 16mm Olympus FE. The FE is by far the best in shooting the MW. With the FE, which is very light, I need a tripod that stands at least a couple feet off the ground because of the FOV; With the other lenses I can get by just an 8 oz tripod - so the difference in weight ends up becoming substantial.
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Jackal
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PostTue Oct 20, 2015 4:43 am 
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Jim, nice exposure and lineup of the Big Dipper, moon, Venus, Jupiter and GPeak. The cloud haze, moon and your timing made for a beautiful effect.

GB, I'm intrigued with sky trackers not just for Milky Way but other objects too. I'm guessing as those become more common in people's kits we'll see a another level and different subject matter in photos being posted. They're not a backpacker's dream item, but could easily change what's possible at drive-up or short-hike locations. I made barn-door tracker a couple summers ago but didn't have much luck with it.

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Jim Dockery
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PostTue Oct 27, 2015 8:51 am 
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Check out the largest picture ever made of the Milky Way. From DPReview:

"Researches from German university Ruhr-Universitat Bochum spent half a decade creating the largest astronomical image created to date, a 46-gigapixel image of the Milky Way, which is now available via an interactive online viewer. The image is made up of 46 billion pixels, and the file weighs in at a hefty 194GB in size. The individual photos were taken at the Cerro Armazones Observatory in Chile in an effort to document objects of 'variable brightness' in our galaxy. Images were recorded night after night, studying 268 sections of sky to look for objects dimming and brightening over time, signaling the presence of a planet moving in front of a star, for example.

In total, the finalized 46-gigapixel image has a resolution of 855,000 x 54,000, and according to the space survey's lead Moritz Hackstein 22,000 Full HD TV screens would be required to display it at its full resolution. The online viewer includes controls for panning and zooming, as well as JPEG quality controls and color adjusters. The image's coordinates are also displayed."

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