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PostSat Sep 06, 2014 8:25 pm 
RandyHiker wrote:
I find it hard to believe that the feds would spend $325m to improve the lives of the Elwha tribe -- unless there were substantial benefits to someone with deep enough pockets to make substantial campaign contributions.

Yeah...that's not really how this went down....

If you're going to make such an accusation, why don't you tell us who you think the big campaign contributor was and to whom?

You won't do that because you can't so why are you just making stuff up?

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PostSat Sep 06, 2014 8:32 pm 
Ski wrote:
I was on the phone talking with ONP's fisheries biologist one day not too terribly long ago when someone walked into his office and dropped a paper on his desk advising him that fish were returning to the river.He was suddenly like a kid under the Christmas tree. Nobody had any idea things would happen so fast.

I would find that a little hard to believe?

Anybody who studies salmon knows that fish will run up the river as far as it needs or wants to the most suitable spawning ground.

A portion of the Salmon will run up and down a river/creek until they find a suitable place.

That's why you find salmon stacked beneath impassable waterfalls.

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RumiDude
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PostSat Sep 06, 2014 9:16 pm 
In related news ...

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20140906/NEWS/140909980/-1/news/updated-8212-after-a-century-fish-return-to-upper-elwha-river

Rumi

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MyFootHurts
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PostSun Sep 07, 2014 8:39 pm 
so when does the hot springs road reopen?

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PostTue Sep 09, 2014 12:57 pm 
RandyHiker,

Your posts are full of so many obvious mistakes that I'm not going to waste time addressing each of them. But feel free to carry on with your misconceptions...and your veiled bigotry.

...the last thing you should want is for me to drink more coffee  biggrin.gif

CTO, I'm fully aware of why the dams were taken out but thanks for your redundancy.

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PostWed Sep 10, 2014 2:34 pm 
Friday, September 05, 2014 4:00 PM

Olympic National Park News Release

Bull Trout Swim Past Glines Canyon; Migratory Fish Return to Upper Elwha River for the First Time in Over a Century

Thanks to a radiotracking program begun this spring, fisheries biologists confirmed yesterday that two radio tagged bull trout have migrated through Glines Canyon and are now upstream of the former Lake Mills in Rica Canyon.

Two other bull trout have also been detected above Glines Canyon, but were not located during the ground survey yesterday.  Biologists will use fixed-wing aircraft to conduct watershed-wide surveys this fall.

“To witness these first fish to migrate above Glines Canyon is both amazing and inspiring,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.  “We always knew the fish would return once the dams were removed – but these four fish passed through Glines Canyon even before the concrete was gone.”

Both of the fish currently in Rica Canyon were tagged earlier this summer at locations below the former Elwha dam site.

The radiotracking program is possible through partnerships with the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington’s National Park Fund, allowing biologists to monitor the movements of radio-tagged salmonids in the Elwha River.

Each fish is equipped with a a uniquely coded radio transmitter that differentiates it from all other tagged fish. Radio signals from the tags are then detected by radio receivers and antennas.  Six telemetry stations were installed between the mouth of the river and just above the Glines Canyon dam site. These stations continually scan for and record data, documenting when individual fish pass by each station.  Biologists also manually track fish between Rica Canyon and the river mouth using handheld radio receivers and antennas

Eighty-seven anadromous fish have been radio-tagged so far.  Of that total, 13 bull trout, 2 winter steelhead, 5 Chinook and one sockeye salmon have been located above the old Elwha dam site.

More details on the migratory bull trout located above Glines Canyon yesterday.

·       **  Fish #167 was captured and radiotagged on May 7 approximately 3.5 miles above the river’s mouth.  Before releasing the fish, biologists recorded its length as 19 inches.  This fish swam through the old Elwha dam site in late July and was detected above Glines Canyon in early August, before the last chunk of the dam was demolished on August 26.

·       ** Fish #200, measuring 20.5 inches, was radio-tagged on June 25 about a mile and a half upstream of the river’s mouth.  This fish swam past the Elwha dam site on July 20 and swam through Glines Canyon on August 24, just before the final blast.

·       **  Bull trout are among the smallest of Pacific salmonids, and are federally listed as a threatened species.

·       **  Rica Canyon is upstream of the former Lake Mills and begins about 2.5 miles above Glines Canyon.

Background and more information about the salmonid radiotracking program and Elwha River Restoration can be found at the Olympic National Park website: http://www.nps.gov/olym/naturescience/damremovalblog.htm

-NPS-

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PostFri Sep 12, 2014 4:38 pm 
Friday, September 12, 2014 3:38 PM

Olympic National Park News Release

Three Chinook Spotted Above Glines Canyon; First Salmon Return to the Upper Elwha in 102 Years

Following an observation by a fisheries biologist and member of the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe of a possible Chinook salmon in the former Lake Mills, two Olympic National Park fisheries staff conducted a snorkel survey of the Elwha River above the old Glines Canyon dam site.

They found three adult Chinook salmon, all between 30 and 36 inches long, in the former Lake Mills, between Windy Arm and Glines Canyon.   Two fish were seen resting near submerged stumps of ancient trees; the third was found in a deep pool in the former Lake Mills.

“When dam removal began three years ago, Chinook salmon were blocked far downstream by the Elwha Dam,” said Olympic National Park Superintendent Sarah Creachbaum.  “Today, we celebrate the return of Chinook to the upper Elwha River for the first time in over a century."

“Thanks to the persistence and hard work of many National Park Service employees, the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe and many other partners, salmon can once again reach the pristine Elwha watershed within Olympic National Park,” said Creachbaum.

In addition to the three Chinook, biologists counted 27 bull trout, nearly 400 rainbow trout and two small sculpin during their survey above Glines Canyon.

The biologists began their snorkel survey in Rica Canyon three miles above the old Glines Canyon dam site.  They then snorkeled downstream through the Canyon, through the former Lake Mills and downstream to a point just above Glines Canyon.

Last week, park biologists confirmed that two radiotagged bull trout had migrated through Glines Canyon and were in Rica Canyon.  The three Chinook observed this week were not radiotagged, but were seen by observers on the riverbank and in the water.

The following day, biologists counted 432 live Chinook in a 1.75 mile section of river just downstream of Glines Canyon, but still above the old Elwha dam site.

Elwha River Restoration is a National Park Service project that includes the largest dam removal in history, restoration of the Elwha River watershed, its native anadromous fisheries and the natural downstream transport of sediment and woody debris.  For more information about this multi-faceted project, people can visit the Olympic National Park website at http://www.nps.gov/olym/naturescience/elwha-ecosystem-restoration.htm.

Attached photo: A member of the Olympic National Park fisheries team snorkels just above the remnants of Glines Canyon Dam.  Three Chinook salmon were sighted during a snorkel survey this week.

--NPS--

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PostFri Sep 12, 2014 5:38 pm 
Ski wrote:
The following day, biologists counted 432 live Chinook in a 1.75 mile section of river just downstream of Glines Canyon, but still above the old Elwha dam site.


up.gif

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PostFri Sep 09, 2016 2:02 pm 
Thursday, September 08, 2016 11:08 PDT

OLYMPIC National Park News Release

Fish Continue to Re-colonize Elwha Watershed

Biologists Document Chinook Salmon, Summer Steelhead and Bull Trout in Upper River

Fisheries biologists monitoring restoration of the Elwha River and ecosystem recently confirmed that adult Chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, steelhead and bull trout have all passed upstream through both the former Elwha and Glines Canyon dam sites to reach the upper Elwha River.

“We are thrilled to see this latest confirmation of the success and value of dam removal,” said Acting Superintendent Rachel Spector. “As restoration proceeds, the benefits continue to mount along the entire river and throughout its entire ecosystem.”

An early August snorkel survey between Rica and Glines Canyons revealed five adult Chinook salmon, one steelhead and ten adult sockeye salmon.  Biologists were even able to watch as two sockeye pairs dug their nests or ‘redds’ near the Boulder Creek confluence within the former Lake Mills.

Later in August, another snorkel survey was conducted between the Hayes River confluence and the Elkhorn Ranger Station along the Elwha River. During this survey, biologists found Chinook, summer steelhead and bull trout, all located upstream of Glines Canyon.

Biologists also use radiotelemetry to track and monitor fish throughout the Elwha. Fish are tagged in the lower river with a small radio transmitter. As fish move through the river, their radio signals are detected by fixed antennae placed along the river banks and by biologists walking or flying above the watershed. Through this process, biologists were able to track an 18-inch bull trout from where it was tagged near the river mouth to a site 29 miles upstream near the confluence of the Goldie River.

The signal also showed that the fish traveled the 16 miles from Glines Canyon to the Goldie confluence in two weeks.

“These observations indicate that last year’s rockfall demolition was effective in improving fish passage through Glines Canyon,” noted Spector.

Last fall, contractors demolished 14 large boulders that were part of a rockfall that occurred sometime between dam construction in the 1920s and the beginning of dam removal in 2011.

Following dam removal, sediment and debris moved downstream and accumulated above the rockfall, creating a barrier to upstream fish passage.

Scientists use a variety of tools to assess Pacific salmon and trout migrations through the former dam sites and canyons including radio telemetry, snorkel surveys, redd surveys and environmental DNA. Later this month, biologists will use redd surveys and environmental DNA to assess Chinook salmon recolonization and spawning throughout 40 miles of the river.

Monitoring ecosystem recovery in the Elwha is a cooperative effort by Olympic National Park, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Geological Survey, NOAA Fisheries, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

In addition to the fish found in the upper river this summer, biologists have observed adult pink, coho and chum salmon, and Pacific lamprey upstream of the former Elwha Dam site.

More information about the world’s largest dam removal and the ongoing restoration of the Elwha River and ecosystem is available at http://go.nps.gov/elwha

www.nps.gov

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostSat Sep 10, 2016 11:23 pm 
Good to here about the pinks.

It'll be interesting to see what happens the next odd year.

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PostSun Sep 11, 2016 9:43 am 
I'm so glad to hear that. It's a success!

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PostTue Sep 13, 2016 6:15 am 
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PostTue Sep 13, 2016 11:28 am 
^ A sticky wicket.

E. Tammy Kim wrote:
"Can anything wild still exist in a Washington river that has been plugged for 100 years?"

Why have the fish been banging their heads against the bottom of the dam for a century?
What dynamic is in play that impels the fish to return to spawning grounds miles upstream from the dam locations?
Are the fish genetically hard-wired to return to their original spawning grounds?

Thanks for the heads up on the article, Gregory. up.gif

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostTue Sep 13, 2016 11:41 am 
Ski wrote:
What dynamic is in play that impels the fish to return to spawning grounds miles upstream from the dam locations?
Are the fish genetically hard-wired to return to their original spawning grounds?

Perhaps it's felt the hatchery fish have no real home other than a tank and the native fish runs are preferred. The Indians need their incomes from potlatch, etc. which they've been denied for years. That was their living off of seafood. They are poor and desperate.

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PostTue Sep 13, 2016 12:01 pm 
Ski wrote:
Are the fish genetically hard-wired to return to their original spawning grounds?

I think this a bit of Disneyish myth.   Salmon have an urge to spawn in suitable creeks and rivers as far up as they can travel and a drawn to the unique scent of the stream where they were hatched.

However now that DNA testing has been used the results indicate that while nearly all of the fish spawn in the creek were hatched, it's not 100% -- a small percentage go up different streams.

If that wasn't the case and salmon would *ONLY* spawn in the stream they were hatched , then salmon would have never colonized more than a single stream -- so some amount of navigational errors are good for the species.

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