Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Early Winters Campground
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
Kim Brown
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 5107 | TRs

Kim Brown
  Top

Member
PostMon Oct 12, 2015 4:24 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
(moderator note: discussion split from another topic by request)

The Early Winters campground was a highway construction camp. There are some remains of an old water pump still there.

--------------
" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
fourteen410
Member
Member


Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 1684 | TRs

fourteen410
  Top

Member
PostMon Oct 12, 2015 6:04 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown wrote:
The Early Winters campground was a highway construction camp.

Awesome to know! I love the historical tidbits on this site.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 5107 | TRs

Kim Brown
  Top

Member
PostMon Oct 12, 2015 7:44 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
fourteen410 wrote:
Kim Brown wrote:
The Early Winters campground was a highway construction camp.

Awesome to know! I love the historical tidbits on this site.

I'll pull up the article I wrote for WTA's magazine, which includes the citations on this information. I got a lot of info on the building of the highway from Jeff Adamson, who we all love, as he is the one who gives us the Highway 20 plowing reports each spring. He sent me some old newspaper & magazine articles.

--------------
" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 5107 | TRs

Kim Brown
  Top

Member
PostMon Oct 12, 2015 7:48 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
OK, so I grabbed this link that Mr. Adamson sent me - 1972 collection of articles.

http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/8D705E08-4DA8-425B-97ED-96ACE4E4B21A/0/WashingtonHwys_Sept1972.pdf

and page 8 of WTA's mag here.

http://www.wta.org/hiking-info/magazine/archive/washington-trails-sep-oct-2012-tree-free/view

--------------
" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Snowbrushy
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Jul 2003
Posts: 6680 | TRs
Location: South Sound
Snowbrushy
  Top

Member
PostMon Oct 12, 2015 8:32 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown wrote:
OK, so I grabbed this link that Mr. Adamson sent me - 1972 collection of articles.

Thank you Kim Brown for that report from 1895 about the state wagon road reconnaissance which followed the "old prospector trail." Apparently the original trail was mostly a backpacker trail with ladders. I can see why some minor would want to ditch (cache) heavy gear along the way to the mines.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Malachai Constant
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jan 2002
Posts: 13878 | TRs
Location: Back Again Like A Bad Penny
Malachai Constant
  Top

Member
PostMon Oct 12, 2015 8:36 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
There was quite a rout there then before the dams. Bolts were driven into the canyon walls to support planks, kind of like the Camino del Roy in Spain. It must have been very cool. cool.gif

--------------
"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
puzzlr
Mid Fork Rocks



Joined: 13 Feb 2007
Posts: 6410 | TRs
Location: Stuck in the middle
puzzlr
  Top

Mid Fork Rocks
PostMon Oct 12, 2015 9:19 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Thanks for that link Kim. Great stuff. But who knows what other treasures are buried in the /NR/rdonlyres/ subbasement of the DOT website. Unfortunately, it doesn't allow a directory listing.

--------------
Mid Fork Rocksflickr
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Snowbrushy
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Jul 2003
Posts: 6680 | TRs
Location: South Sound
Snowbrushy
  Top

Member
PostMon Oct 12, 2015 9:34 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
puzzlr wrote:
what other treasures are buried in the /NR/rdonlyres/ subbasement of the DOT website.

Here is the public info about a state auto south Cascade pass that was actually given a state route number but never built. This was originally an alternate of the old Oregon wagon road (Oregon Trail.)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_State_Route_168
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Snowbrushy
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Jul 2003
Posts: 6680 | TRs
Location: South Sound
Snowbrushy
  Top

Member
PostTue Oct 13, 2015 11:31 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown wrote:
The Early Winters campground was a highway construction camp. There are some remains of an old water pump still there.

Early Winters Ski Resort (Defunct) was a prospect taken into account for the decision to build the highway, along with the general economic development of the area - tourism. Gold and silver - the outfitters always follow closely and stick around after the gold rush and provide jobs. But they don't sell bacon. wink.gif
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_State_Route_20
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Snowbrushy
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Jul 2003
Posts: 6680 | TRs
Location: South Sound
Snowbrushy
  Top

Member
PostTue Oct 13, 2015 4:57 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
From the above Wiki article.

"History: What is known today as the North Cascades Highway was originally the corridor used by local Native American tribes as a trading route from Washington's Eastern Plateau country to the Pacific Coast for more than 8,000 years."

The above statement is debatable. The pass used was Cascade Pass. Many canoe were found at the top of Lake Chelan. The Indians didn't have planks and ladders to make a trail over the Skagit Pass. Cascade Pass was easier and involved water travel which was more agreeable. Furthermore, there wasn't much of a trade between west and east. It was more for social reasons of marriage, etc..
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2009
Posts: 5107 | TRs

Kim Brown
  Top

Member
PostTue Oct 13, 2015 7:06 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
You're right about the social aspect of the route. I understand from a conversation I had with a Sauk Suiattle tribal member that the ancestral tribes that now comprise the Sauk Suiattle had relatives east of the crest. I would imagine there was some trade; if nothing else, trading gifts annually.

I enjoy stories about the origins of our modern roads. THe gent who posted about the hunters camp on an old road above highway 20 posted a fine story indeed. Stuff like that is cool.

--------------
" I'm really happy about this! … I have very strong good and horrible memories up there."  – oldgranola, NWH’s outdoors advocate.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Snowbrushy
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Jul 2003
Posts: 6680 | TRs
Location: South Sound
Snowbrushy
  Top

Member
PostWed Oct 14, 2015 10:43 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown wrote:
trading gifts

Potlatch: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potlatch

I personally can't find any history to indicate that the highway 20 route was ever used in it's entirety as a trail or wagon road until the modern period. And that was about access to a "destination ski resort" to compete with resort development at Whistler in BC.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Snowbrushy
Member
Member


Joined: 23 Jul 2003
Posts: 6680 | TRs
Location: South Sound
Snowbrushy
  Top

Member
PostThu Oct 15, 2015 5:37 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Kim Brown wrote:
I enjoy stories about the origins of our modern roads.

This road is built on or along the oldest white trail through what used to be wilderness between Dupont, Wa. and the upper Cowlitz River. Between Fort Nisqually and the large Cowlitz Farm, and a water trail to Fort Vancouver, all of which were run by the British Hudsons Bay Company. American settlers would later use the trail and complain to the government about how muddy it could be.
http://americanroadmagazine.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=955

The Granary in Fort Nisqually.
The Granary in Fort Nisqually.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Pacific NW History > Early Winters Campground
  Happy Birthday Kathleen, eplanajr, Pepper!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy