Forum Index > Gear Talk > MTB talk.... Front suspension or rigid?
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Brucester
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PostFri Nov 27, 2015 8:47 pm 
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I ride on the road some. Not super far, but far enough.

I've been liking gravel roads and some off road with my rigid bike.

I do ride my 26'er with the Fox fork more on trails. Maybe that's my answer?

I've been looking at 29'ers and wondering if I should go rigid. I am 48 and like cushy. Makes for softer endo's. lol.gif

The added weight and cushion vs connection to the earth and Advil.

Old dirt riders, your thoughts?
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JEGeorge
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PostFri Nov 27, 2015 8:56 pm 
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IMO with all the new technology being put into MTB's and such I would go for one.  Take the following with a grain of salt as I ride a 650b FS but If it were me, I would.  On mine, the front shock can be locked to almost rigid or unlocked for those technical/bumpy sections.  Tends to cut down on the after ride tingle in the arms  lol.gif If you ended up not liking the shock, you could easily sell it with enough to afford a higer end rigid.

Curious to see others thoughts.
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Jaberwock
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PostFri Nov 27, 2015 10:14 pm 
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I use a rigid 29 for logging roads and rolling trails, best bike I've owned. Picked it up on Craigslist for $250, not bad.

I hate running into bikes on trails while I'm walking so I try not to take it on trails that are used by walkers/hikers.  Just logging road ride it to walking spots and stash the bike in the ferns.

I rode it pretty aggressively when I first got it (SST etc. on Galbraith in Bham) but after seeing how much that rigid fork bends and flexes I've started using this bike only on logging roads and mellow trails.  Great bike though, still not sure what brand it is...

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Old Not Bold Hiker



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PostFri Nov 27, 2015 10:35 pm 
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I remember riding mtn bikes with rigid forks.... In the 80's.
Macho it out and you can have ripped up back of your hands and crippling arthritis down the line like I now have.

Get a front shock, with lockout feature for pavement.

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Brucester
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PostSat Nov 28, 2015 1:28 am 
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Cool bike jabber! 250 is sweet!

I get it boot up. Thanx. up.gif

I always appreciate your straight up insight and advice.

After years of being a laborer, believe me my 48 year old hands hear ya too!
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jared_j
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PostSat Nov 28, 2015 7:15 pm 
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Riding a rigid fork on an Mtb (even if it's mellow stuff) is like telemark skiing.  A willful rejection of technology advancement, and usually something enjoyed by folks who are very experienced and in need of a new challenge.  Kinda like tying one arm behind your back.
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Old Not Bold Hiker



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PostSat Nov 28, 2015 8:56 pm 
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I have been taking my restored early 90's full-rigid Specialized Rock Hopper down to Bend Oregon on our visits this past summer. I don't have to worry about it on the long drive hanging off the car. Fun for riding the smoother easier trails of that area. Lots of high bling bikes not sure what to make of the old geezer on the antique.

My good bike is an Ellsworth with 5" travel front and back.

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Brucester
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PostSat Nov 28, 2015 9:53 pm 
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Ellsworth made in the USA. up.gif

I had a Epiphany, I got a buzz riding that one, fancy bike, sold it. Never felt secure storing it..... Creaky rear suspension. My only FS bike.
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Malachai Constant
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PostSat Nov 28, 2015 10:15 pm 
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I have a FS Cannondale and used it to great advantage in Canada where the trails are pretty technical. I have used it on the downhill trails at Whistler but it is not as burley as a DH bike for big drops. Around here I usually lock up the rear to prevent bio pacing. I used to have a ridged MTB but sold it to someone here for a commuter for less than th components were worth. It always made my hands numb. Lynda has a hard tail with a front suspension and it works fine for most trails around here. If it feels good do it. wink.gif

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"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
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DigitalJanitor
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PostSat Nov 28, 2015 10:18 pm 
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I just got a new fork for my Ibis Mojo after spending multiple years and thousands of miles riding the original into pasta. Aftermarket fork prices are breathtaking! But man does she ride better now, lol....

We're all fortunate to live in an age of reliable and effective suspension engineering, especially as we get older. You CAN ride just about anything with a solid fork- we all did back in the day after all- but our observation is that it will take more time to cover the same ground, be harder on your body, and wear you out more at the end of the day.

The only bike I'd readily consider for fully rigid these days would be a fat bike, but that's at least in part because it would be used for marginal snow and possibly some sand, not as a main and/or back country ride.

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Cyclopath
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PostMon Nov 30, 2015 10:46 am 
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I'd want to borrow or rent a few personally, and see for myself what I prefer.  I don't have much MTB experience but I've always put in a lot of road miles.  I descend more confidently with a rigid or locked out fork because the bike moves the way I expect it to.  I'm sure if I put in more time on a suspension fork it would get to be more familiar.
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Brucester
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PostSun Dec 29, 2019 1:44 pm 
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I found this Transition Covert on eBay a few months ago.

Was thinking why stop at just front suspension and went for it.

Crazy fun geometry and suspension travel. The tires are so thin though.  lol.gif Maybe I can find some 2.6 inchers and see if they'll fit?!

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Cyclopath
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PostSun Dec 29, 2019 4:17 pm 
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Sexy!

That might be the smallest chainring I've ever seen.
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DigitalJanitor
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PostMon Dec 30, 2019 11:50 am 
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Oh I've had some 20t chainrings back in the day and loved em, lol.

Transition makes some really good bikes. Not the lightest, but friends have been pounding the crap out of em for years in the woods and they hold up well. If you have problems or questions the company is responsive.  up.gif

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Forum Index > Gear Talk > MTB talk.... Front suspension or rigid?
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