Forum Index > Full Moon Saloon > First total solar eclipse since 1979 in US mainland; Aug, 21, 2017
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
RichP
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jul 2006
Posts: 4148 | TRs
Location: Seattle
RichP
Member
PostMon Jan 02, 2017 9:43 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I witnessed one on the east coast on March 7, 1970 and still remember to this day the sound of birds and other animals that were going crazy when day turned into night at an odd time.

Quote:
On Aug. 21, the moon will completely blot out the sun for observers in 12 states, from Oregon to South Carolina, in the first total solar eclipse visible from the United States mainland since 1979. The rest of North America, and parts of South America, Africa and Europe, will be treated to a partial eclipse.


http://www.space.com/35171-great-american-solar-eclipse-coming-in-2017.html

--------------
Without obsession, life is nothing. John Waters
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
kbatku
Questionable hiker



Joined: 17 Sep 2007
Posts: 3203 | TRs
Location: Yaquima
kbatku
Questionable hiker
PostMon Jan 02, 2017 12:05 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I watched the 1979 one from a Grayhound bus - this one should be a bit classier for me, though motels in the area (Oregon anyway) are already booked.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Malachai Constant
Member
Member


Joined: 13 Jan 2002
Posts: 13639 | TRs
Location: Back Again Like A Bad Penny
Malachai Constant
Member
PostMon Jan 02, 2017 5:35 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I watched the 79 one from the Vashon Harper ferry it was not total here but got pretty dark and birds got excited.

--------------
"You do not laugh when you look at the mountains, or when you look at the sea." Lafcadio Hearn
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Grannyhiker
Member
Member


Joined: 29 Jul 2006
Posts: 3106 | TRs
Location: Gateway to the Columbia Gorge
Grannyhiker
Member
PostMon Jan 02, 2017 8:38 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Should you plan to drive down to Oregon to watch this one:  All hotel/motel rooms and other lodging in the path of totality, even those as primitive as the cabins at Olallie Lake (just north of Mt. Jefferson) have been fully booked for years by various travel agencies and brokers.  Reservable state park campsites in the totality path were fully booked within a few minutes of when they first opened up (at midnight).  I expect the same will happen to reservable sites in National Forest campgrounds when reservations open in February, although I do plan to try.  ODOT expects considerable traffic jams the morning of the eclipse.  I suspect that parking spots may be at a premium. There will be a big eclipse party at the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem and another over at Madras (supposedly the best place in the world to view the eclipse, so probably the most crowded).

The 1979 eclipse was visible (sort of, because it was getting quite cloudy and the sun was completely obscured just after the end of totality) from my home in (at that time) Moses Lake, so I guess I can't complain if I miss this one.  It is a spectacular sight, though, and I'd love for my grandchildren to see it.

I understand that some local climbers plan to do their eclipse viewing from the summit of Mt. Jefferson.  I hope there will be enough space up there!

--------------
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.--E.Abbey
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Justus S.
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Nov 2004
Posts: 1171 | TRs
Location: WA
Justus S.
Member
PostTue Jan 03, 2017 10:48 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Borah in Idaho looks to be a spot to see it too... Tetons on WY.  Pretty cool high mtn spots to be.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Toni
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Sep 2007
Posts: 788 | TRs
Location: Issaquah
Toni
Member
PostTue Jan 03, 2017 11:22 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Heading to Bend, the traffic getting there might be a headache!

--------------
Let's not run out of Chocolate.........
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Grannyhiker
Member
Member


Joined: 29 Jul 2006
Posts: 3106 | TRs
Location: Gateway to the Columbia Gorge
Grannyhiker
Member
PostWed Jan 04, 2017 2:15 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Bend is south of the path of totality; you'll see only a partial eclipse there.  Sisters is just on the edge (totality will last only a few seconds).  Madras is right in the middle, which is why (in additiion to its weather) it's considered the best place to watch.  There are lots of maps online.  If you drive north from Bend the day of the eclipse, you'll probably be eclipse-watching in the midst of a traffic jam!

--------------
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.--E.Abbey
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Toni
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Sep 2007
Posts: 788 | TRs
Location: Issaquah
Toni
Member
PostWed Jan 04, 2017 2:55 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Grannyhiker wrote:
  If you drive north from Bend the day of the eclipse, you'll probably be eclipse-watching in the midst of a traffic jam!

Yes, driving 97 from Yakima down and back. Staying w relatives in Bend but leaving really early am morning of, join the masses.

--------------
Let's not run out of Chocolate.........
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Grannyhiker
Member
Member


Joined: 29 Jul 2006
Posts: 3106 | TRs
Location: Gateway to the Columbia Gorge
Grannyhiker
Member
PostWed Jan 04, 2017 2:59 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
At least you'll have a place to stay!  If I can't snag a campsite in the totality area, I'll be driving from my home just east of Portland starting at (or before) the crack of dawn, probably on US 26.  I wonder how much the Warm Springs Tribes will charge for parking?

Maps:
Communities in Oregon
Great American Eclipse

--------------
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.--E.Abbey
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Toni
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Sep 2007
Posts: 788 | TRs
Location: Issaquah
Toni
Member
PostWed Jan 04, 2017 9:59 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Thanks Grannyhiker for the info on Eclipse and Maps. And Good luck getting a place to stay or just winging it by getting up early. I suspect lot's of folks will be getting up at 3-4 am and parking in  the best place they can along side of road...hmmm? for the 2 min. plus viewing.  state patrol will be buzzing I'm sure. But it'll be an adventure to witness something that won't come around again in my lifetime!

--------------
Let's not run out of Chocolate.........
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Grannyhiker
Member
Member


Joined: 29 Jul 2006
Posts: 3106 | TRs
Location: Gateway to the Columbia Gorge
Grannyhiker
Member
PostWed Jan 04, 2017 10:46 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Actually, things start to happen once the eclipse gets to about 80-85% of totality.  It's fascinating--birds think night is coming.  At about 95% a cool breeze hit (of course this was February, in the Columbia Basin, with clouds coming in, so maybe the reduced sunlight had nothing to do with it).  The Bailey's Beads just before totality are truly exciting (they are also visible when totality ends).  We need to be sure we're parked and watching at least 20 minutes before totality hits.  Trying to watch the eclipse while driving is probably not a great idea. biggrin.gif

Do be sure to have high quality eclipse glasses or welder's goggles.  You can very quickly burn a lovely blind spot in your retinas without them!  Back in '79 we used multiple layers of exposed film, but in today's age of digital cameras, that's no longer an option.  My late ex-husband watched a solar eclipse as a youngster and got blind spots.  Fortunately it wasn't a serious burn and his retinas recovered after a week or so--he was lucky.

I plan to go over that way and scout around next spring or summer for places to park.  Another option is to backpack in to, say, Park Ridge, but if, as I expect, I have family with me, that's not an option.  Unless my current health improves, it won't be an option for me, either.

--------------
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.--E.Abbey
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
moonspots
Happy Curmudgeon



Joined: 03 Feb 2007
Posts: 1743 | TRs
Location: North Dakota
moonspots
Happy Curmudgeon
PostThu Jan 05, 2017 9:18 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Toni wrote:
And Good luck getting a place to stay or just winging it by getting up early.

Yeah, I had that idea also, but doubt that it would work out as planned. Originally I thought that watching from Misery Ridge at Smith Rock State Park would be the best idea (and it would have been if it were just me, but with wife, son and grandkids along, not such a good idea), so we've changed locations. I checked motels at the coast, and the one(s) that are not already full want somewhere between $500-600/night!

To update, we (my brother and I) had secured one @$230/night, then when he went to put CC on file the other day, the rate had changed to $800/night with a 5 night minimum! moon.gif  rant.gif

So we declined, and he found a cabin owned by a friend of a client that's available.  up.gif  I also secured a motel in Eugene for 3 nights as a backup. I sure hope this is worth it. If for no other reason, I can re-stock my supply of Ninkasi!  up.gif  drink.gif

--------------
"Out, OUT you demons of Stupidity"! - St Dogbert, patron Saint of Technology
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Wazzu_camper
Go Cougs!



Joined: 06 Feb 2008
Posts: 543 | TRs
Location: Woodinville
Wazzu_camper
Go Cougs!
PostFri Mar 03, 2017 12:13 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I'm planning a trip into the Winds. I imagine the trail heads even there will be a mob scene though.

--------------
www.madcampers.com
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Visit poster's website Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat
Member
Member


Joined: 17 Dec 2001
Posts: 10157 | TRs
Location: Lyle, WA
MtnGoat
Member
PostTue Mar 14, 2017 9:50 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
A few notes..

-  People outside the astro community don't understand that eclipse viewing is practically a religion for a lot of people and they will be coming out of the woodwork from around the world, like me they have been planning for this (and others) for decades. It started being a deal on the casual internets in the last few months...it has a been a deal in the astro community for decades and trust me, they've outplanned you.( And me, most likely. wink.gif) Do not think it's like a few more people than usual for a meteor shower or something. This is orders of magnitude different.

- Do not underestimate the traffic. A truly massive number of people will descend upon the Madras area since it has the best chance of being clear in the US and I'm pretty sure the traffic will be biblical, both in and out....if you're planning a drive and return on that day it's pretty risky in terms of making it on time, IMO. In 1979 the little known Goldendale and Horse Heaven hills areas had a very high traffic volume. I was there and there were people parked everywhere in the middle of nowhere, and that was with super poor weather forecasts.

-  I expect this one to be way more crowded. 11 miles from the path, 19 minutes to go and you're in a 15 mile jam because of a flat tire in Shaniko after the 2 hours for the wreck on 84..you're screwed. IMO the drive down on the day of, even if you leave early, is by far the riskiest option. The sun and moon stop for no one...you can't make the wedding, work will have to do without...wink.gif

- Totality is around 10:20 or so in Madras, and the partial eclipse begins about an hour earlier.

- If you want to see the corona you *must* be in the path of totality. 90% total doesn't cut it, 99% total does not cut it. You *MUST* be in the path. If you're stuck in traffic outside it, all you get is a better than usual partial eclipse. No stars, no corona.

- The closer to the centerline you get, the longer the total phase. For the full 2 min and a couple seconds, you must be within about ten miles of the centerline.

- Beware of spending so much time and energy on photos and digital toys that you miss out on uncluttered experience of the total phase...it is only two minutes long.

- Our plan is to avoid the chaos coming and going by making it a multiday car camp. I'm scouting dispersed sites along the centerline and E of the Cascade Crest this spring in preparation.

- build a pinhole viewer with the kids, a box, some tape and foil. instructions abound on the interwebs. Also, any small scope or binos can be adapted with solar film you just rubberband it over the lenses. The *only* time it is safe to view the sun with direct vision is during the totality phase.

--------------
Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Brockton
Member
Member


Joined: 02 Aug 2012
Posts: 203 | TRs
Location: West Seattle
Brockton
Member
PostWed Mar 15, 2017 9:52 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
MtnGoat wrote:
Do not underestimate the traffic.

Thanks for the reality check.  I have no idea what to expect but I fear that the worst my imagination can come up with for Central Oregon traffic that day won't be enough to prepare me.  I don't know where yet we're going to stay the night before but at least we've blocked off the days before and after.

Sleep in our car seats the night before?  Sure!  Hellish day-long traffic jam afterwards?  Why not?
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Full Moon Saloon > First total solar eclipse since 1979 in US mainland; Aug, 21, 2017
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy