Forum Index > Gear Talk > IRC tubeless road bike tires are real nice
Previous :: Next Topic  
Author Message
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 2501 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
  Top

Faster than light
PostSun Nov 05, 2017 6:27 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
There aren't that many choices if you want a 28 mm tubeless road tire.  The go to is Schwalbe Pro One, which is outstanding on pavement but cuts too easily on dirt and gravel.

IRC is a Japanese tire company.  I didn't know anybody who'd tried them, but their Formula Pro Tubeless looked good on paper.  I've been using them for about a month - 400 miles.  About 50 of that has been on dirt roads:  Harts Pass, Blewett area, Amabilis, etc.  They haven't given me anything to complain about.  Excellent grip in all conditions.  Great ride quality.  No issues running tubeless, I keep 60 to 80 psi in them.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
iron
getting old



Joined: 10 Aug 2008
Posts: 6139 | TRs
Location: kenmore
iron
  Top

getting old
PostMon Nov 06, 2017 11:45 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
do you need a special rim size for 28 tubeless? i've run 23 tubeless on my wheels, but got lazy after the tire wore all the way through and just replaced with 28 tubed tires.

--------------
man, you go through life, you try to be nice to people, you struggle to resist the urge to punch 'em in the face, and for what?

--- moe sizlack
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
DIYSteve
seeking hygge



Joined: 06 Mar 2007
Posts: 12636 | TRs
Location: here now
DIYSteve
  Top

seeking hygge
PostMon Nov 06, 2017 12:48 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath wrote:
I keep 60 to 80 psi in them

Is that just for dirt roads or do you run them that low for paved road riding? 80PSI in 28's seems too low for a guy your size riding on pavement.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 2501 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
  Top

Faster than light
PostMon Nov 06, 2017 4:46 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
You know, a neat thing about riding tubeless is you don't have to worry about pinch flats ... because there's no tube to pinch.   smile.gif

I'm using tubeless ready rims, I've heard of people making it work with non-tubeless rims and plenty of tape.  I have pretty wide ones, they work best with 28 mm tires.

It seems like tubeless is pretty widely accepted in the MTB world, but still at the margins of the road world.  "Gravel" is getting popular and people are using it over there, but 28 mm seems narrow for the gravel crowd.  So, if you want a 40 mm tubeless tire, you have all kinds of choices.  If you want it narrower, there aren't as many options.

What pressure did you run the 23s at, iron?
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
iron
getting old



Joined: 10 Aug 2008
Posts: 6139 | TRs
Location: kenmore
iron
  Top

getting old
PostMon Nov 06, 2017 4:55 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
pressure was 90-100. i'm 170. in 2 years of riding, never had a flat from glass - just from wearing through the rubber and the air leaking out. then, i also had a bad pinch flat, but i was probably running 50-60 psi (cold snap) and hit a sharp-edged pothole that taco'd my awesome wheel that had 20k miles and was perfectly true. sigh...

--------------
man, you go through life, you try to be nice to people, you struggle to resist the urge to punch 'em in the face, and for what?

--- moe sizlack
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
DIYSteve
seeking hygge



Joined: 06 Mar 2007
Posts: 12636 | TRs
Location: here now
DIYSteve
  Top

seeking hygge
PostMon Nov 06, 2017 6:26 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath wrote:
You know, a neat thing about riding tubeless is you don't have to worry about pinch flats

Uh yeah, I know that. I was talking about rolling resistance and handling. So you run 28s at 60-80PSI on pavement? That's way low for a guy your size.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 2501 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
  Top

Faster than light
PostTue Nov 07, 2017 8:08 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Usually I run somewhere around 70 psi on pavement.  Handles beautifully.  80 works too, but it's a little hard.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 2501 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
  Top

Faster than light
PostTue Nov 07, 2017 8:10 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
iron wrote:
pressure was 90-100. i'm 170. in 2 years of riding, never had a flat from glass - just from wearing through the rubber and the air leaking out. then, i also had a bad pinch flat, but i was probably running 50-60 psi (cold snap) and hit a sharp-edged pothole that taco'd my awesome wheel that had 20k miles and was perfectly true. sigh...

Sounds like an awful day.  At least you got your money's worth out of the wheel though!
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
DIYSteve
seeking hygge



Joined: 06 Mar 2007
Posts: 12636 | TRs
Location: here now
DIYSteve
  Top

seeking hygge
PostTue Nov 07, 2017 10:11 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath wrote:
Usually I run somewhere around 70 psi on pavement.  Handles beautifully.  80 works too, but it's a little hard.

80PSI in your rear 28 tire is too hard for pavement?  confused.gif  I usually run my 28s at 105PSI rear, 95PSI front. My body weight is similar to yours, maybe a bit less.

There's a reason road racers and triathletes often run their rear tires at 120PSI.

There's good data out there to support going with higher pressures on pavement. Start here: https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/road-bike-reviews Note the respective wattage demand numbers at 60PSI, 80PSI, 100PSI and 120PSI, and the universal correlation between higher pressure and lower rolling resistance. You spend lots of money on fancy (IMO too delicate for a guy your size) wheels, and whatever advantage the less mass has during windup* is more than eaten up by the higher RR for a guy your size. (Higher body weight --> more tire deformation --> higher RR)

*As a matter of fundamental mechanical physics, less wheel mass has meaningful relevance only during acceleration and braking. Once wound up to speed, wheel mass is virtually irrelevant.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
iron
getting old



Joined: 10 Aug 2008
Posts: 6139 | TRs
Location: kenmore
iron
  Top

getting old
PostTue Nov 07, 2017 10:17 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
DIYSteve wrote:
*As a matter of fundamental mechanical physics, less wheel mass has meaningful relevance only during acceleration and braking. Once wound up to speed, wheel mass is virtually irrelevant.

with the caveat that shape matters bigtime. i believe CP has deep dish wheels.

--------------
man, you go through life, you try to be nice to people, you struggle to resist the urge to punch 'em in the face, and for what?

--- moe sizlack
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 2501 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
  Top

Faster than light
PostWed Nov 08, 2017 9:06 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
DIYSteve wrote:
There's a reason road racers and triathletes often run their rear tires at 120PSI.

Sure.  Because they're on 23 mm tires.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
Cyclopath
Faster than light



Joined: 20 Mar 2012
Posts: 2501 | TRs
Location: Seattle
Cyclopath
  Top

Faster than light
PostWed Nov 08, 2017 9:15 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
DIYSteve wrote:
There's good data out there to support going with higher pressures on pavement. Start here: https://www.bicyclerollingresistance.com/road-bike-reviews Note the respective wattage demand numbers at 60PSI, 80PSI, 100PSI and 120PSI, and the universal correlation between higher pressure and lower rolling resistance.

From your link, we're talking about a theoretical difference of less than 2 watts.   lol.gif
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
DIYSteve
seeking hygge



Joined: 06 Mar 2007
Posts: 12636 | TRs
Location: here now
DIYSteve
  Top

seeking hygge
PostWed Nov 08, 2017 10:37 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
Actually, road racers are using bigger tires -- as big as 28s -- at high pressures. Objective rolling resistance test results have killed the old myth that skinnier tires have less rolling resistance. I've long suspected that: smaller patch = more deformation.

Those tests are actual measurement, not theoretical.

Increasing PSI from 80 to 110 saves more than 2 watts for many tires. As iron said, you also need to match the rim to the tire. More vertical sidewall = less rolling resistance.

Even for those tires that are only 2 watts improvement, note that the lower RR per higher pressure applies to the entire time you're on the bike. Contrast your fancy light wheels, which provide a small power savings advantage only on windup. Again, I'd bet money that running 60-80PSI in your tires more than eats up the small power savings you get from fancy light (and more fragile) wheels.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
RandyHiker
Snarky Member



Joined: 27 Jul 2008
Posts: 5883 | TRs
Location: Mobile
RandyHiker
  Top

Snarky Member
PostThu Nov 09, 2017 6:22 am 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
There is more to tire/wheel/pressure selection than selecting a combo that maximizes performance.

Choosing bigger tires and running them at a more relaxed pressure results in a cushier ride.   Not so important when hammering at max speed for a few hours.   But more appreciated when the ride last days or weeks and enjoying the scenery is a higher priority than maximum daily mileage.
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Send e-mail Reply to topic Reply with quote
schifferj
Member
Member


Joined: 07 Mar 2015
Posts: 88 | TRs
Location: Inland Empire
schifferj
  Top

Member
PostSun Nov 12, 2017 3:17 pm 
Reply to topic Reply with quote
I've had an interesting afternoon of reading whilst not watching NFL football.

I've been riding with 700 x28c Specialized S-works Turbo tubeless tires.  I weigh 160 pounds and run them at 80 PSI front and rear as per Stans recommendation on the stock tubless ready wheels that came with my bicycle.  This setup has has made for a very comfortable ride.  I've not had a flat or any other problem using this setup but I do not ride on gravel roads.

I've decided to give the IRC Formula Pro RBCC tires a try not that I've been disappointed with the Specialized tires (both front and rear have 2000+ miles with no problems noted) based on the OP's post.

In my readings I came across something called Orange Sealant.  Has anyone out there used this?  Is it any better than Stans?
Back to top
View user's profile Search for posts by this user Send private message Reply to topic Reply with quote
  Display:     All times are GMT - 8 Hours
Forum Index > Gear Talk > IRC tubeless road bike tires are real nice
  Happy Birthday Gabigabs, alpine964!
Jump to:   
Search this topic:

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
   Use Disclaimer Powered by phpBB Privacy Policy