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Brushbuffalo
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Brushbuffalo
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PostTue Nov 21, 2017 6:51 pm 
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Hesman wrote:
is a dark green color.

Hesman, those dark ones appear to be crystals of a mineral in the pyroxene family, probably either augite or diopside.  Both pictures also show quartz, but it is anhedral ( poor externally- displayed crystal form). The Royal Basin, where you saw your specimens, is basalt. Quartz is not found in basalt but can be emplaced later in dikes and veins.

Thanks for the offer about your agates, but 'no thanks.'   On second thought, a picture of a bunch would be cool. cool.gif

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Schenk
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Schenk
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 9:42 am 
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When it comes to crystals, most folks don't karat all, unless they are precious.
But this is very cool and informative, thank you.

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Jake Robinson
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 9:56 am 
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Brushbuffalo wrote:
Without being there or seeing more photos my educated guess is those are small, very uniform contraction columns in a deformed bed such that the columns are lying on their long axis.

That's fascinating. I've seen columnar basalt before at Frenchman Coulee and remember being struck by how the columns were nice neat polygonal shapes with perfectly flat faces. Very cool how such things can form in nature. By the way, Aaron got a photo that better shows the scale of that outcrop on Mystery:

Mount Mystery summit. Photo by Aaron Wilson.
Mount Mystery summit. Photo by Aaron Wilson.

He also got a photo of some interesting rock on nearby Hal Foss Peak:

Hal Foss Choss. Photo by Aaron Wilson.
Hal Foss Choss. Photo by Aaron Wilson.

And speaking of Olympic Mountain pillow basalt, am I correct in assuming that's what this is? Taken near the summit of Mount Constance:

Constance rock. Pillow basalt in the light on the left side of the picture?
Constance rock. Pillow basalt in the light on the left side of the picture?

This is a very cool thread, thanks Brushbuffalo!
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IanB
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IanB
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 10:04 am 
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Kim Brown wrote:
I used to collect pretty rocks and stones; I had 'em in vases and on my windowsill.  But then I learned that a rocks job on earth is to make it to the nearest trench, where it can morph and become another rock.  So I felt sorry for the rocks and stones and I had been holding in captivity.

If anything, rocks are patient.  I don't imagine that they mind so much what are intrinsically temporary changes of scenery.  (Especially the ones that land glamorous roles in Japanese gardens.)

As far as windowsill clutter, pretty rocks no longer cut it.  I became a rock-snob and only bring home agates and petrified wood.

Hesman wrote:
Should I post a pic of my agate collection? It is has almost 22,000 agates in it. hockeygrin.gif  winksmile.gif  I know I'ma bit crazy.gif about finding them.

Jeepers!  I ain't tellin' you about any more sekrit beaches!   wink.gif

I heard a story about an elderly lady that had collected "jars and jars" of agates living on the beach.  Wanting others to have the pleasure of finding them all over again, she left instructions upon her passing that they be rowed out to the center of the bay so they could begin the journey back to the shore.    rolleyes.gif

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Hesman
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Hesman
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 10:07 am 
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Brushbuffalo wrote:
On second thought, a picture of a bunch would be cool. cool.gif

I'll take a picture or two of some of the more interesting ones I have.

In regards the picture of all my agates I said more in jest than actually doing it.

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You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time. - Abraham Lincoln
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Hesman
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 10:49 am 
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A few agates. I have a few other interesting ones but the interesting parts would not have shown up in a picture that I could have taken. The ones in the pics were found on beaches in the South Puget Sound area. The biggest agate I have found on the beaches is the size of a softball.


I have found a few in the Willipa Hills area and in Ellensburg. Sadly didn't find an Ellensburg blue when I was looking for agates in Ellensburg. The Kittitas County Historical Museum has some excellent samples of Ellensburg blues.

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You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time. - Abraham Lincoln
Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened. - Dr. Seuss
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Hesman
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 10:54 am 
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IanB wrote:
I heard a story about an elderly lady that had collected "jars and jars" of agates living on the beach.

27 jars of agates on display in my humble abode and over half of those are gallon sized. eek.gif  dizzy.gif

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You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time. - Abraham Lincoln
Don't cry because it's over. Smile because it happened. - Dr. Seuss
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DIYSteve
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 11:14 am 
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Jake Robinson wrote:
He also got a photo of some interesting rock on nearby Hal Foss Peak:

Hal Foss Choss. Photo by Aaron Wilson.
Hal Foss Choss. Photo by Aaron Wilson.

I've seen similar shattered rock in other places, e.g., Bailey Range ridgetop N of Bear Pass. I surmised (perhaps incorrectly) that it was some sort of frost-shattered metamorphic rock, maybe schist
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pushkarwallah
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pushkarwallah
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 2:04 pm 
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the thread rocks. keep them coming!
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ale_capone
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ale_capone
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 2:44 pm 
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ale_capone
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ale_capone
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 2:51 pm 
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Thanks Rock Star!



Sorry, my words dissappeared. And I can't find the natural pics I have. Not sure how the rocks feel about being part of my landscape, but they look content. I think if they try to escape, IL just let them go though.

Location. East side Stevens pass. Backside of ski Hill. Tye mill road. The creek on the immediate West of ' the burn '. Creek runs from the road, to a small waterfall just above the power lines.( can't find photo)

Creek is entirely boulders of the swirly patterned rock. Tried to find a photo of the water, as it's exposed bedrock.. Have also found garnets not to far from there, embedded like the rock near grizzly peak.
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Brushbuffalo
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Brushbuffalo
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 3:42 pm 
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Jake Robinson wrote:
the columns were nice neat polygonal shapes with perfectly flat faces

In your original image, look toward the right third and you can see several polygonal surfaces facing right. Furthering the hypothesis of these forms being contraction columns, these would be the ends of columns whose long axis is horizontal.

Mount Hal Foss rock looks like slate. It is common especially in slate for it to break into these pencil-like splinters.

Your final picture, Jake, shows good pillows from a distance. Yes, that part of the Olympics has got 'em!  They form by  fluid lava erupting either under deepish water or flowing  on land  into water. There are good videos available showing their formation live.

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Brushbuffalo
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Brushbuffalo
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 3:44 pm 
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Amazing pillows, ale_ capone.
Kilauea?

Looking closer, it tricked me!   biggrin.gif Those are individual cobbles or boulders that as you explain are now held captive in your yard with no immediate prospects for escaping. Can't tell size, which distinguishes cobble from boulder.Then I read your note and you confirm it.

That's a rock I would want to pick up and handle to identify with total confidence, but I believe the weird boulder/cobble is graphitic mica schist that was mechanically-weathered as part of the stream's bedload. Google 'schist' for images. Note the 'stripes', a characteristic of schist due to foliation. That texture, which looks like sedimentary layering,  is due to linear or platy minerals (like  biotite mica) that became oriented due to directed ( unbalanced) pressure during metamorphism in the crust.

A further clue is there is an extensive area of exposed schist in that region from which these clasts could be derived.

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ale_capone
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ale_capone
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 4:28 pm 
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Ha. Sorry, I didn't read the add something for scale disclosure. That particular one is a baby boulder, about the size of a soccer ball. There is a maple leaf, and blue fescue grass blades on the sides.

In the creek, they range from pebbles, to immovable by two men..

Always found them a bit.strange because most everything else is more granite like in that area. Still combing old photos for the waterfall. I'd feel silly if put or somebody just dumped them there.

Unfortunately,  I can't lift more then ten pounds for the next month, or I'd bring it to the social. wink.gif
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Jake Robinson
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Jake Robinson
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PostWed Nov 22, 2017 6:15 pm 
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Adam (Gimpilator) wanted me to share this on his behalf. He took it on Bare Mountain in Nevada (36.842643, -116.674074).

Shell fossils in Bare Mountain rock
Shell fossils in Bare Mountain rock
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Forum Index > Trail Talk > "What's this rock? What's that landform?"
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