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gb
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PostMon Sep 03, 2018 6:35 am 
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http://www.endangered.org/12-conservation-success-stories-for-endangered-species-day/
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gb
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PostMon Sep 03, 2018 6:43 am 
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THE ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT WORKS: 100 SUCCESS STORIES
The Endangered Species Act is one of the most successful environmental laws in U.S. history and America’s foremost tool for protecting biodiversity. Its purpose is to prevent the extinction of our most at-risk plants and animals, increase their numbers, and effect their full recovery — and, eventually, their removal from the endangered list.
Currently, the Act protects more than 1,600 species in the United States.
Quantitative measures of the Act’s success:
• Less than 1 perrcent of species have gone extinct once granted protection under the Act.
• The longer a species is listed under the Act, the more likely it is to be recovering.
• Species with critical habitat designated under the Act are twice as likely to be recovering as those without critical habitat.
• Species with recovery plans are more likely to be recovering than those without plans.
• The more money is spent on a species, the more likely that species is to be recovering.

Click on the map to find species in your region
There are hundreds of species whose populations have soared thanks to the Endangered Species Act. A Center study of all endangered species in the northeastern United States found that 93 percent increased or remained stable since being placed on the endangered list; this extraordinary success rate represents a fair sample that can be extrapolated nationwide.
Among the species to benefit are the bald eagle (which increased from 416 to 9,789 pairs between 1963 and 2006); the whooping crane (which increased from 54 to 513 birds between 1967 and 2006); the Kirtland’s warbler (which increased from 210 to 1,415 pairs between 1971 and 2005); the peregrine falcon (which increased from 324 to 1,700 pairs between 1975 and 2000); the gray wolf (whose populations increased dramatically in the Northern Rockies, Southwest, and Great Lakes); the gray whale (which increased from 13,095 to 26,635 whales between 1968 and 1998); and the grizzly bear (which increased from about 224 to over 500 bears in the Yellowstone area between 1975 and 2005).
The map above shows 100 recovery success stories spanning every U.S. state and territory. Click on any region to find species on the road to recovery — you can learn about the Big Bend gambusia, a tiny Texas fish that increased from a couple dozen holdouts on the knife-edge of extinction to a thriving population of over 50,000; the state bird of Hawaii, the Hawaiian goose, which increased from 400 birds in 1980 to 1,275 in 2003; or the Virginia big-eared bat, the state bat of Virginia, which increased from 3,500 in 1979 to 18,442 in 2004, to name but a few.
There’s California’s southern sea otter, which increased from 1,789 in 1976 to 2,735 in 2005, while the state’s tiny San Clemente Indian paintbrush increased from 500 plants in 1979 to more than 3,500 in 1997. Or there’s Florida’s red wolf, which increased from 17 in 1980 to 257 in 2003, while the state’s Key deer increased from 200 in 1971 to 750 in 2001.
The imperiled plants and animals who share our deserts, forests, rivers and oceans have much to be thankful for in the Endangered Species Act.

https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/campaigns/esa_works/

This despite the weaponized attacks of those that oppose this act.
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treeswarper
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PostMon Sep 03, 2018 11:03 am 
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Ah yes.  The ESA has been very good for the Center for Biological Diversity.  At one time, when they were the Southwest Center for Biological Diversity, they could not afford the gas to go look at a project.  Now look at them.  Yes, the ESA has been a gold mine for them.  Are there 11 more groups that have become financially successful?   embarassedlaugh.gif

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gb
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PostMon Sep 03, 2018 12:12 pm 
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treeswarper wrote:
yes.  The ESA has been very good for the Center for Biological Diversity.  At one time, when they were the Southwest Center for Biological Diversity, they could not afford the gas to go look at a project.

Yes it has been very good for the animals. That is what it is all about.
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DigitalJanitor
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PostTue Sep 04, 2018 9:14 am 
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We tell our daughter all the time that it was much more rare to see bald eagles when we were her age than now.

We also didn't used to see the numbers of river otters and beavers we're seeing now, most likely due to various legislative and management maneuvers. And the first salmon I saw in the main trunk of the Yakima was somewhere around 2000, many thanks to the tribes as well as a few other players on that.

Often such efforts aren't perfect, but I'm glad we've gotten enough right to make a visible difference in these cases.

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Ski
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PostSat Sep 08, 2018 9:55 am 
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One's interpretation of "success" all depends upon whose propaganda you choose to believe.

Of course, if you choose to dismiss sources out of hand simply because of some bias against that particular source, you only see one facet of the reality.

The truth is that some of the claims of "success" are dubious at best. In the case of the Gray Whale, the animal was already protected by the 1972 Marine Mammal Protection Act. In some other cases, there exist legitimate questions as to whether or not a particular species should have ever been listed in the first place.

Compare claims against facts:

Is the Endangered Species Act a Success or Failure?
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/endangered-species-act-success-failure/

==

New Heritage Foundation report highlights failures of Endangered Species Act
http://www.cfact.org/2018/05/22/new-heritage-foundation-report-highlights-failures-of-endangered-species-act/

==

Endangered Species Act Doesn’t Save Species
https://spectator.org/307517-2/

==

While the ESA has certainly accomplished some of its objectives, there are far more failures than successes.
Unfortunately, continuing to pursue objectives which cannot be attained simply isn't financially sustainable over the long term:

FEDERAL AND STATE ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES EXPENDITURES
https://www.fws.gov/endangered/esa-library/pdf/20160302_final_FY14_ExpRpt.pdf

==

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gb
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PostSun Sep 09, 2018 3:40 pm 
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I would tend to value the Scientific American as a reliable source. The other sources are clearly on the far right side of the political spectrum.

And personally, I think it is worth it trying to keep species from going extinct.
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PostSun Sep 09, 2018 5:40 pm 
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gb wrote:
The other sources are clearly on the far right side of the political spectrum.

So? How does that change the validity of their claims? Please point out any factual errors for us.

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gb
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PostMon Sep 10, 2018 6:26 am 
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gb wrote:
I would tend to value the Scientific American as a reliable source. The other sources are clearly on the far right side of the political spectrum.

And personally, I think it is worth it trying to keep species from going extinct.
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Ski
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PostMon Sep 10, 2018 9:25 am 
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gb wrote:
The other sources are clearly on the far right side of the political spectrum.

The expenditure report published by the US Fish & Wildlife Service is from a source "clearly on the far right side of the political spectrum"?

SRSLY? lol.gif

again, feel free at any time to point out any factual errors in any of those articles I cited above.

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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MtnGoat
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PostMon Sep 10, 2018 3:19 pm 
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You won't get an answer on factual errors, because this isn't about empiricism and strict adherence to scientific method. It's about political fealty.

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Diplomacy is the art of saying 'Nice doggie' until you can find a rock. - Will Rogers
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PostTue Sep 11, 2018 11:53 pm 
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Tuesday September 11, 2018 17:44 PDT

WDFW NEWS RELEASE

Most of the Columbia River closIng to salmon and steelhead fishing


OLYMPIA – Starting Thursday (Sept. 13), fishing for salmon will be closed on the mainstem Columbia River from Buoy 10 upstream to Hwy 395 in Pasco under new rules approved today by fishery managers from Washington and Oregon

Deep River in Washington and other tributaries in Oregon (Youngs Bay, Tongue Point/South Channel, Blind Slough and Knappa Slough) are also closed to salmon and steelhead angling.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) already prohibited steelhead retention in much of the same area of the Columbia River several weeks ago, and the new emergency rule closes angling for both salmon and steelhead in those waters as well.

Bill Tweit, Columbia River fishery coordinator for WDFW, said the counts of fall chinook at Bonneville Dam are 29 percent below preseason forecasts, and on-going fisheries are approaching the allowable catch limits under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). 


"We recognize that this closure is difficult for anglers, but we have an obligation to meet our ESA goals so that fisheries can continue in the future," he said.

Tweit said the upriver fall chinook run provides the bulk of the harvest opportunity for fall fisheries, but that returns in recent years has been declining due to unfavorable ocean conditions. The preseason forecast for this year is 47 percent of the 10-year average return of upriver bright fall chinook.

The new emergency fishing rule is posted on WDFW's website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/.

-WDFW-

(* emphasis added *)

==

FEDERAL AND STATE ENDANGERED AND THREATENED SPECIES EXPENDITURES 2014 (expenditures for Salmon and Steelhead begin in Table 1 - page 25)

==

On the way over to my mom's house earlier I passed by one middle school and one elementary school (each in different districts) where teachers were out on the sidewalk with picket signs - on strike again for adequate education funding.

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treeswarper
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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 8:49 am 
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MtnGoat wrote:
You won't get an answer on factual errors, because this isn't about empiricism and strict adherence to scientific method. It's about political fealty.

And money.  Lots of money.  But maybe money IS politics?



I find it depressing that one of the posters on this site always thinks he knows the political leanings of anyone who dares to disagree with him.  It's actually pretty sad.

The ESA was well intentioned.  The trouble is, it has been bastardized by groups taking advantage of it in order to stop a project they deem to be "bad" or as mentioned above, make money for their group and lawyers.  So, extra dollars must be spent to make sure every little loophole is closed, every i dotted, and punctuation is correct, or it may be taken to court. I doubt that was thought of during the formation of the act.

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Gregory
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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 9:09 am 
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A friend of mine was a tribal fisherman for a coastal tribe. He told me the elders of the tribe were actually more interested in the salmon and steelhead being listed by the EPA because of the millions of dollars that comes with the listing. The ESA listing is worth a hundred times the market value of the fish. Sad.

In the early nineties, WDFW noticed that the anadromous fish runs were failing on the Hood Canal rivers. They changed the regs to catch and release except hatchery steelhead. This is different than selective gear regulations in that bait is still allowed. You ever pull a snelled bait hook out of a salmon smolts throat and seen it swim away? Me and WDFW shellfish biologist brought this to WDFW attention to no avail. They kept the regs until the fish were listed on the ESA.The irony is that the fish were mismanaged by the government with no accountability and now we are rewarding them with millions of dollars.
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gb
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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 11:58 am 
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Ski wrote:
gb wrote:
The other sources are clearly on the far right side of the political spectrum.

The expenditure report published by the US Fish & Wildlife Service is from a source "clearly on the far right side of the political spectrum"?

SRSLY? lol.gif

again, feel free at any time to point out any factual errors in any of those articles I cited above.

I looked at that 2014 report which is factual. That was implied in my statement "I think it is worth it."
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