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gb
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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 12:02 pm 
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Gregory wrote:
A friend of mine was a tribal fisherman for a coastal tribe. He told me the elders of the tribe were actually more interested in the salmon and steelhead being listed by the EPA because of the millions of dollars that comes with the listing. The ESA listing is worth a hundred times the market value of the fish. Sad.

I agree completely. But the value of commercial fishing and tribal fishing in Washington not to mention cultural significance is quite great: In 2006 $: https://wdfw.wa.gov/publications/00464/
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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 1:01 pm 
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gb, responding to my statement regarding the Federal and State Endangered and Threatened Species Expenditure Report 2014  wrote:
I looked at that 2014 report which is factual. That was implied in my statement "I think it is worth it."

So in spite of the fact that by any metric the combined efforts of WDFW, USFWS, and NOAA have completely failed to effect any positive results on populations of anadromous salmonid recovery, and in the vast majority of cases of other species listed as "Threatened or Endangered" no positive results have been realized, the monetary expenditures were "worth it"?

Simply burning the money would have been significantly cheaper. The end results would have been the same, and we would have been spared the expense of the administrative costs.

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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 3:23 pm 
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I did not read your link because I just do not have time. The WDFW used to brag about how much the sportsmen brought into local economies too. The numbers were greater than the commercial whether tribal or not.short of the tribes taking a buy out from the state, they will never lose their rights. Treaties and the bolt decision guarantee that.

When we sportsmen pushed for and got regulation requiring the release of wild steelhead the tribes used the "foregone opportunity" clause in the Boldt decision to net the fish we gave up, trying to save them from ESA listings.My friend new that this added net time was going to further add to the decline. He wanted to be a fisherman, not a biologist but the elders wanted biologists, not A fisherman. He does not do what they want, they not only chastise him but his brother's, uncles etc.

Politicians love the Esa because it brings two things. Power and huge amounts of money WITHOUT having to ask for or answer to, the lowly taxpayers.

I truly wish the EPA was not the problem but the answer.  Twenty plus years of hands-on experience I know this to not be true.I have friends within that still bring me tidbits of hope but money talks......
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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 4:11 pm 
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Gregory wrote:
I did not read your link because I just do not have time.

Gregory, the "expenditure report" is a bajillion pages of dollar figures that have been spent on a bajillion different "threatened and endangered" species - everything from slime molds to grizzly bears. A cursory glance at the document tells you all you need to know: there's one hell of a lot of money being spent on "threatened and endangered" species, and as the articles I cited on the previous page point out, the success rate is dismal.
If the wildlife and lands management agencies were private corporations, their stocks would have tanked long ago, all the members on the boards of directors would have been fired, and the desks and chairs would have been sold at a foreclosure auction.

Unfortunately, this is all supported by the deep pockets of "Big Daddy" government (i.e., you and me), so the prevailing policy is "at any cost".

I won't engage in any discussions of the Boldt decision. What I will say is that I believe the tribal decision-makers are completely disconnected from reality concerning escapement numbers.

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostWed Sep 12, 2018 4:54 pm 
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Wednesday September 12, 2018 17:07 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Anglers limited to one adult fall chinook in the Hanford Reach


Action: Reduces the daily limit to one adult fall chinook from the Highway 395 Bridge (Pasco/Kennewick) upstream to Priest Rapids Dam. Prohibits retention of coho salmon.

Effective dates and locations:

Sept. 15 through Oct. 31, 2018 from Hwy. 395 Bridge (Pasco/Kennewick) to the Old Hanford townsite wooden powerline towers
Sept. 15 through Oct. 15, 2018 from the Old Hanford townsite wooden powerline towers to Priest Rapids Dam.
Species affected:  Fall chinook and coho.

Location: Highway 395 Bridge (Kennewick/Pasco) upstream to the Priest Rapids Dam.

Reason for action: The upriver bright fall chinook escapement goal for the Hanford Reach is 31,100 adult chinook. Fall chinook and coho salmon are returning to the Columbia River well below the forecast. Reduction of the daily limit to one adult fall chinook will provide anglers the opportunity to continue to harvest available fall chinook salmon and still meet conservation goals for escapement of upriver bright fall chinook in the Hanford Reach.

Closure of retention of coho in the Hanford Reach fishery will contribute in efforts to meet hatchery coho broodstock collection and escapement targets destined to return to upper Columbia River tributaries.

Additional information: The daily limit is six salmon with up to one adult fall chinook. Release all coho and sockeye. Anglers must stop fishing for salmon after the adult portion of the daily limit is retained.

Information contact: Paul Hoffarth, District 4 Fish Biologist, (509) 545-2284.

-WDFW-

(* emphasis added *)

==

Wednesday September 12, 2018 17:15 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Lower Samish River to close to all fishing


Action: Close part of the Samish River to all fishing.

Effective dates:  Sept.15, 2018 until further notice.

Species affected: All species.

Location: From the mouth (Bayview –Edison Road) to I-5 bridge

Reasons for action: The return of fall chinook to the Samish Hatchery is currently projected to be below the number needed to meet egg take goals for 2018. Closing the fishing season in the lower Samish River will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure future hatchery returns.

Other information: The season will be reopened if egg take needs are projected to be met. Please refer to https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/ for further information on seasons.

Information Contact: Mill Creek Regional Office, 425 775-1311

-WDFW-

(* emphasis added *)

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostFri Sep 21, 2018 12:53 pm 
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Monday September 17, 2018 17:03 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Anglers must release steelhead in the Hanford Reach


Action: Release all steelhead in the Hanford Reach.

Effective date: Immediately, until further notice.

Species affected: Steelhead

Location: Columbia River, from the wooden powerline towers at the Old Hanford townsite to Priest Rapids Dam.

Reason for action: This action is being taken to comply with federal requirements under NOAA Fisheries, as stipulated in Permit 1395.

Additional information: This emergency rule will be in force until permanent rules take effect.

-WDFW-

=========================================================

Tuesday September 18, 2018 17:02 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Chinook salmon retention to close on the lower Cowlitz River


Action: Chinook salmon retention closes on the lower Cowlitz River and tributaries (except the Toutle River).

Effective dates: Sept. 22, 2018 until further notice.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Locations: The Cowlitz River and tributaries (except the Toutle River) from the mouth to the Barrier Dam.

Reason for action: The Cowlitz River fall chinook salmon run is tracking far below the preseason forecast and is currently projected not to meet the hatchery broodstock goal. Closing the lower Cowlitz River to chinook salmon retention will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure fishing opportunities in future years.

Additional information: The lower Cowlitz River remains open to harvest of hatchery coho salmon and hatchery steelhead until further notice. The closed waters section below the Barrier Dam will remain 400', at the posted markers, until further notice. All other permanent rules remain in effect. Please refer to the Sport Fishing Pamphlet for complete rule information.

Information Contact: Tom Wadsworth, District Fish Biologist, (360) 906-6709.

-WDFW-

=========================================================

Tuesday September 18, 2018 17:04 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Washougal River to close to the retention of chinook salmon


Action: Closes the Washougal River to retention of hatchery chinook salmon.

Effective Dates:  Sept. 22, 2018, until further notice.

Species affected:  Chinook salmon.

Locations:  Washougal River from the mouth to the bridge at Salmon Falls, and Camus Slough.

Reason for action: The Washougal River fall chinook salmon run is tracking far below the pre-season forecast and is currently projected not to meet the hatchery broodstock goal. Closing the river to chinook retention will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure fishing opportunities in future years.

Additional information: Camas Slough is currently closed for retention of hatchery steelhead due to closures on the mainstem Columbia River.  This fishing rule change closes Camas Slough to retention of hatchery chinook while it is in effect.

The Washougal River remains open for retention of hatchery steelhead and hatchery coho salmon until further notice. All other permanent rules remain in effect. Please refer to the Sport Fishing Pamphlet for complete rule information.

Information Contact:  Region 5, (360) 696-6211. For the latest information, press *1010.

-WDFW-

=========================================================

Wednesday September 19, 2018 10:58 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Anglers limited to one adult salmon in the lower Yakima River


Action:  Reduces the daily limit to one adult salmon, either coho or chinook, on the lower Yakima River.

Effective dates: Sept. 22 through Oct. 31, 2018

Species affected:  Fall chinook and coho.

Location: Yakima River, from Highway 240 Bridge in Richland upstream to the Grant Avenue Bridge at Prosser.

Reason for action: Fall chinook and coho salmon are returning to the Yakima and Columbia Rivers well below the forecast. The reduction of the daily limit to one adult will contribute in efforts to meet escapement and hatchery broodstock for fall chinook and coho salmon in the Yakima River.

Additional information: The daily limit is six salmon with up to one adult salmon, either chinook or coho. Anglers must stop fishing for salmon after the adult portion of the daily limit is retained.

Information contact: Paul Hoffarth, District 4 Fish Biologist, (509) 545-2284.

-WDFW-

=========================================================

Thursday September 20, 2018 18:01 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Salmon fishing to close in Willapa Bay (Marine Area 2.1) and all tributaries 


Action:  Marine Area 2.1 (Willapa Bay) and all tributaries to close for salmon fishing until further notice.

Effective dates: 11:59 p.m. Sept. 21 until further notice.

Species affected: All salmon species.

Location: Marine Area 2.1 (Willapa Bay); Bear River from mouth to Lime Quarry Road; Naselle River from mouth to Naselle Hatchery attraction channel; Middle Nemah River from mouth to Middle Nemah A-Line; North Nemah River from HWY 101 to bridge on Nemah Valley Road; South Nemah River, from mouth upstream; Willapa River from mouth to Fork Creek; and South Fork Willapa River from mouth to Pehl Rd. bridge.

Reason for action: Fall chinook are returning to tributaries of Willapa Bay in significantly lower numbers than preseason predictions in all fisheries. Closing the salmon fisheries will increase the number of hatchery fish available to make egg take goals at this time. Managers will continue to assess chinook returns and will re-open the fisheries if warranted.

Information contact: Chad Herring, South Coast Fishery Policy, (360) 249-1299.

-WDFW-

(* emphasis added *)

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostSat Sep 29, 2018 11:26 pm 
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Wednesday, September 26, 2018 17:02 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Salmon fishing to close in Willapa Bay tributaries


Action: Sections of Willapa Bay tributaries will remain closed for salmon fishing until further notice.

Effective dates: Oct. 1 until further notice

Species affected:  Salmon.

Location: North Nemah River from Nemah Hatchery barrier dam to N700 Rd.; Willapa River from Fork Creek to Hwy. 6 Bridge; Fork Creek from Forks Creek Hatchery rack upstream 500’ at fishing boundary sign; North River from Hwy. 105 Bridge to Fall River; and Smith Creek from mouth to Hwy. 101 Bridge.

Reason for action: These sections of Willapa Bay tributaries were scheduled to open Oct. 1 for salmon fishing. WDFW previously closed the lower stretches of these tributaries to protect returning fall chinook.

Fall chinook are returning to tributaries of Willapa Bay in significantly lower numbers than preseason predictions in all fisheries. Closing the salmon fisheries will increase the number of hatchery fish available to make egg take goals at this time.

Additional information:  Managers will continue to assess Chinook returns and re-open if warranted.

The following sections of Willapa Bay tributaries remain closed to salmon fishing until further notice:

Bear River from mouth to Lime Quarry Road; Naselle River from mouth to Naselle Hatchery attraction channel; Middle Nemah River from mouth to Middle Nemah A-Line; North Nemah River from HWY 101 to bridge on Nemah Valley Road; South Nemah River, from mouth upstream; Willapa River from mouth to Fork Creek; and South Fork Willapa River from mouth to Pehl Rd. bridge.

Information contact: Chad Herring, South Coast Fishery Policy Analyst, (360) 249-1299.

-WDFW-

=========================================================

Thursday September 27m, 2018 11:00 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Salmon fishing rules to change on Snohomish, Snoqualmie, Skykomish and Wallace rivers


Action:  Closes all salmon fishing in the following areas: Snohomish River, Snoqualmie River, and the Skykomish River upstream of the Wallace River.

In addition, all salmon must be released except for marked hatchery coho on the Wallace River and the Skykomish River from the mouth to the Wallace River.

Effective date:  Sept. 29 through Nov. 15, 2018.

Species affected:  Salmon.

Location:  Snohomish, Snoqualmie, Skykomish, and Wallace rivers.

Reason for action:  In-season run size updates indicate that the Snohomish wild coho run is lower than the pre-season forecast. These measures are needed to protect future runs of coho by increasing chances wild spawner escapement goals are met. 

Additional information: Areas that remain open for salmon have a daily limit of two fish, release all salmon other than hatchery coho. Gamefish remain open in these rivers as described in the 2018-19 Fishing Rules Pamphlet.

For the Wallace River, the area between the hatchery weir and 400 feet downstream of the weir remains closed until the weir is removed.

If coho salmon abundance improves, fisheries may be reopened.

Information contact: WDFW, Mill Creek, Region 4 Office, (425) 775-1311.

-WDFW-

==========================================================
Thursday September 27, 2018 11:03 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Adult salmon daily limit reduced in Drano Lake


Action: Reduces the adult portion of the salmon daily limit to one in Drano Lake.

Effective Dates:  Effective Sept. 29, 2018 until further notice.

Species affected: Salmon.

Locations:  Drano Lake, in the waters downstream of markers on point of land downstream and across from Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery and upstream of the Highway 14 Bridge.

Reason for action: The estimated number of chinook returning to the pool above Bonneville Dam was recently reduced from preseason forecasts. A reduced daily limit is needed to ensure that additional fish are available for broodstock collection at Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery.  Fishery managers will continue to coordinate with hatchery managers and monitor the progress of hatchery returns.

Other information:  The daily salmon limit remains 6 fish total, of which only one may be an adult.  Drano Lake remains closed to night fishing for salmon and steelhead and closed to retention of steelhead.

Information Contact:  Region 5, (360) 696-6211.  For latest information press *1010.

-WDFW-

==========================================================

Friday September 28, 2018 11:50 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Anglers limited to one hatchery steelhead in the lower Hanford Reach


Action: Reduces the daily limit to one hatchery steelhead when the fishery opens Oct. 1. Anglers must release all steelhead other than hatchery steelhead marked by both an adipose and right ventral fin clip.

Effective date: Oct. 1 until further notice.

Species affected: Steelhead.

Location: Columbia River, from Highway 395 Bridge (Kennewick/Pasco) upstream to the wooden powerline towers at the old Hanford townsite.

Reason for action: The run-size has been reduced to 92,800 A/B Index steelhead from the pre-season forecast of 182,400 fish. Reducing the daily limit to one Ringold Springs- origin hatchery steelhead (those marked by both an adipose and right ventral fin clip), will help to ensure hatchery broodstock collection goals are met while still allowing anglers steelhead fishing opportunity.

Additional information: Steelhead released from Ringold Springs Hatchery have both a clipped adipose fin and a clipped right ventral fin. This unique mark (clips) allows these steelhead to be differentiated from upper Columbia River and Snake River steelhead and allows these steelhead to be selectively harvested.

Information contact: Paul Hoffarth, District 4 Fish Biologist, (509) 545-2284.

-WDFW-

(* emphasis added *)

--------------
"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostWed Oct 03, 2018 4:45 pm 
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Wednesday October 3, 2018 17:08 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Grays and West Fork Grays rivers to close for hatchery coho retention


Action: Closes the Grays and West Fork Grays rivers to retention of coho.

Effective date: October 6, 2018 until further notice.

Species affected: Coho salmon.

Location: The Grays River to the mouth of the South Fork Grays River and West Fork Grays River from the mouth upstream.

Reason for action: The Grays River Hatchery coho return to date is below what is needed for hatchery broodstock. The 2018 return has been influenced by poor ocean conditions and reduced juvenile releases in previous years. Closing coho retention in the Grays River and West Fork Grays River will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure fishing opportunities in future years.

Additional information: Fishing remains open on the mainstem Grays River upstream of the mouth of the South Fork as well as the South and East Fork Grays Rivers under permanent rule as described in the 2018/2019 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet.

Information contact: Region 5 Office, 360-696-6211 *1010

-WDFW-

==========================================================

Wednesday October 3, 2018 17:11 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Chinook salmon retention to close on Toutle, North Fork Toutle rivers


Action: Chinook salmon retention closes on the Toutle River and the North Fork Toutle.

Effective dates: October 6, 2018 until further notice.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Locations: The Toutle River from the mouth to the forks; the North Fork Toutle River from the mouth to the posted markers downstream of the fish collection facility.

Reason for action: Fall chinook salmon returning to the North Toutle Hatchery, located on the Green River, are tracking well below the pre-season forecast and are not currently projected to meet the hatchery broodstock goal. These fish must first migrate through the Toutle and North Fork Toutle rivers. Closing the Toutle River and North Fork Toutle River to chinook salmon retention will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure fishing opportunities in future years.

Additional information: The Green River is also currently closed to chinook retention. Retention of hatchery coho remains open on the Toutle, North Fork Toutle and Green rivers. All other permanent rules remain in effect. Please refer to the Sport Fishing Pamphlet for complete rule information.

Information contact: Tom Wadsworth, District Fish Biologist, (360) 906-6709.

-WDFW-

(* emphasis added *)

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Bernardo
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PostThu Oct 04, 2018 3:50 pm 
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Ski, where are the fish?
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PostThu Oct 04, 2018 6:52 pm 
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That's a good question.

You will note that several of those closure notices include language about "ocean conditions", which is something over which we have no control.

Another contributing factor is the fact that the small food fish species of the north Pacific are being mined by at least a dozen different countries at an unsustainable rate for the production of "fish pellets" for the "aquaculture" industry. (i.e., "farm-raised fish") (That fact in and of itself should be a compelling enough argument to not eat farm-raised fish.)

It is ironic in that the Columbia River was the world's largest salmon-producing watershed in the world. (I believe the Skagit ran a distant second.)

All the money in the world being thrown at the problem - see the "expeditures report" cited above - isn't even beginning to have any impact on the recovery of anadromous salmonids here in the Pacific Northwest. As I said above, we would have been money ahead if they had simply burned the money - it would have had about the same effect.

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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostSun Oct 14, 2018 8:03 am 
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Orca population hits 30-year low in Puget Sound / July 19. 2018 Seattle Times / KOMO

Endangered Species Act Status of Puget Sound Killer Whales


Recently observed declines in return numbers of anadromous salmonids (cited in posts above) do not bode well for the endangered Puget Sound Orca.
It does not appear that either the Endangered Species Act or the Marine Mammal Protection Act are having any significant effect in restoring populations of resident Puget Sound Orcas.

Nick Gayeski, PhD, Aquatic Ecologist, for Wild Fish Conservancy wrote:

Urgent measures are required to save the SRKW

The tragic losses this summer of endangered juvenile Southern Resident killer whales (SRKW) has dramatically drawn attention to both their increasingly desperate plight and obvious failure of the 2008 federal recovery plan to adequately address the threats to their survival.


Three critical factors are widely acknowledged to be responsible for the recent losses and the overall decline in population numbers: lack of prey (primarily Chinook salmon); disturbance from vessel noise and traffic (including from whale watching and sport and commercial fishing vessels); and high levels of toxics (Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) especially PCBs) in whale tissues, particularly blubber.

This article will address the first factor, lack of available prey.


Despite federal, provincial, and state agency denials that Chinook harvest management is or has been a factor contributing to the current condition of SRKW, Chinook salmon harvest management continues to be one of the most basic causes of the current state of the SRKW population. In particular, the coastal mixed-stock salmon fisheries managed pursuant to the Pacific Salmon Treaty continue to harvest Chinook populations bound for the Salish Sea, including the Fraser River and several large rivers in north-central Puget Sound. Many Chinook populations from these Salish Sea rivers are depressed, listed under the Endangered Species Act, and regularly fail to achieve minimal spawner escapement goals.


Immediate, near-term actions are required to halt the decline of the SRKW population, starting with a significant reduction (if not complete elimination) of all coastal mixed-stock Chinook fisheries in order to assure, with very high probability, that minimal numbers of mature Chinook salmon return to SRKW summer foraging areas. Following this action, “minimum” numbers of Chinook salmon made available to SRKW in all known or suspected summer foraging areas must be conservatively estimated, giving the whales the benefit of the doubt where uncertainty exists, and placing the burden of proof that such measures are unnecessary or ineffective squarely on the shoulders of those commercial and recreational interests to demonstrate with credible, independently evaluated, data.


Other actions that will benefit the SRKW population in the longer-term can certainly be undertaken simultaneously with the immediate actions described above. Most important among these are the breaching of the four Lower Snake River dams, increased spring spill at Columbia and Snake River mainstem dams, and reductions of toxic point- and non-point-source POPs – especially those compromising the quality of nearshore marine waters in which juvenile Chinook salmon rear. But none of these alone or in combination will result in the immediate benefits to SRKW in the summer/fall foraging areas in the Salish Sea required to stabilize the population in the immediate future.

Finally, the idea advocated by Governor Inslee and the Governor’s Southern Resident Orca Task Force to radically increase the number of hatchery Chinook salmon produced in state and tribal hatcheries should be recognized as a non-starter from the outset.

The Governor’s proposal to rely on increased hatchery production to address a fundamentally ecological problem is a clear example of the placeless management of salmon and their fresh and saltwater ecosystems that has resulted from management agencies’ 130 year-old reliance on an industrial agricultural model that treats salmon as a marketable commodity and ignores salmon’s attachment to place – the rivers and stream of where their parents spawned and in which juveniles reared, and the freshwater and marine pathways and environments through which they must travel in order to grow, mature, and return to complete each population’s unique life cycle. This profound attachment to place is the source of the great historical diversity, local adaptation, and resilience to environmental disturbance of the great salmon complex of the Pacific Rim, that is currently imperiled by rapid environmental change and placeless management.

As with salmon, southern resident killer whales are place-based creatures, whose life cycle is strongly attached to place and the adaptive characteristics of the individuals, pods, and population are strongly shaped by the many environments and ecological conditions they must encounter over the course of their lifetimes. If this unique population is to be preserved and ultimately recovered to the robust condition envisioned in the current recovery plan, place-based management is required.

The Failure of Wild Salmon Management: Need for a Place-Based Conceptual Foundation


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I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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PostSun Oct 14, 2018 1:03 pm 
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Ski, All I can say is that is seriously messed up.  We need some #winning in this area.  Yhanks for highlighting these issues.
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PostMon Oct 15, 2018 4:44 am 
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treeswarper wrote:
Ah yes.  The ESA has been very good for the Center for Biological Diversity.  At one time, when they were the Southwest Center for Biological Diversity, they could not afford the gas to go look at a project.  Now look at them.  Yes, the ESA has been a gold mine for them.  Are there 11 more groups that have become financially successful?   embarassedlaugh.gif

Amen to that
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PostWed Oct 17, 2018 10:59 pm 
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Monday October 15, 2018 17:13 PDT

WDFW FISHING RULE CHANGE 

Drano Lake to close to all fishing


Action: Closes Drano Lake to all fishing.

Effective date: Oct. 17, 2018 until further notice.

Species affected: All species

Location: In the waters downstream of markers on a point of land downstream and across from Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery and upstream of the Highway 14 Bridge. 

Reason for action: The return of fall chinook to Little White Salmon National Fish Hatchery is currently projected to be below the number needed to meet egg take goals for 2018. Closing the fishing season in Drano Lake will increase the number of hatchery fish available for broodstock and help ensure future hatchery returns.

Information contact: Matt Gardner, Region 5 Fish Biologist, 360-906-6746

-WDFW-

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"I shall wear white flannel trousers, and walk upon the beach. 
I have heard the mermaids singing, each to each."
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Sculpin
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Joined: 23 Apr 2015
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Sculpin
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PostThu Oct 18, 2018 7:32 am 
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Your view of the ESA will boil down to whether you believe that creatures other than humans have intrinsic value.

Here are a few thoughts to ponder:

1.  The ESA was the first law of its kind to actually recognize intrinsic value in other species.  In that sense, it was not just a landmark in law, but a landmark in human thought.

2.  There was no blueprint for how to do it.  It was pretty easy to predict that it would be messy.

3.  The bald eagle almost went extinct.  I sometimes wish that it had.  We would have had to change our national symbol.  Benjamin Franklin thought that the turkey should be our national symbol, and after driving the eagle to extinction, who could argue?

The Heritage Foundation wants you to think of blind spiders and water snakes, precisely because it is more challenging to see the intrinsic value in them.

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Even my best friends, they don't know, that my job is turning lead into gold. When you hear that engine drone, I'm on the road again, and I'm searching for the philosopher's stone - Van Morrison
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Forum Index > Stewardship > 12 Success stories of the Endangered Species Act
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