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Jeff H
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PostSun Dec 09, 2018 12:43 pm 
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Just curious who carries their helmet on the outside of your pack and how you attach it?  I'm mostly interested in ski helmets while backcountry sking and trying to keep it dry while skinning up.  my new pack doesn't have enough room for all the gear so the helmet gets to ride on the outside.  i've seen those mesh straps that can connect to a pack but not sure they work on every pack.  just curious what other people use.  maybe it'll spark an idea.

thanks
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RandyHiker
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PostSun Dec 09, 2018 2:15 pm 
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Carry helmet on head.  C.A.M.P Speed 2.0 is so light, that I don't notice it is there, until I clunk a low branch.
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DIYSteve
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PostSun Dec 09, 2018 2:21 pm 
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When I carry a hardhat outside the pack, it's usually strapped on via the pack compression straps. That may not work for you because many new packs lack the 3-compression straps per side design of many traditional packs.

RandyHiker wrote:
Carry helmet on head

That can lead to overheating for we sweaty Viking ski tourists.
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RandyHiker
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PostSun Dec 09, 2018 3:41 pm 
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DIYSteve wrote:
That can lead to overheating for we sweaty Viking ski tourists.

Do you make the same complaint about your bike helmet?
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jared_j
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PostSun Dec 09, 2018 4:05 pm 
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The big hassle for me is difficulty securing the helmet so that it doesn’t sway as I stride, as it annoys the crap out of me.

I have a Petzl Elios.  I find what works best is threading a strap on the pack through the plastic “head cradle” at the rear of the helmet (rather than the helmet chinstrap).  This plastic cradle is sufficiently flush to the helmet body that such a method of mounting holds the helmet secure against the pack and it doesn’t swing.  I usually do this with one of the vertical straps attached to the pack lid.

I considered a customized strap arrangement but it seemed too fiddly; something that would work well in my living room or garage but be a PITA in the field.
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joker
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PostSun Dec 09, 2018 5:01 pm 
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RandyHiker wrote:
DIYSteve wrote:
That can lead to overheating for we sweaty Viking ski tourists.

Do you make the same complaint about your bike helmet?

When I'm not moving at typical bike velocity, yes. I usually take mine off quickly after stopping.
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RandyHiker
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PostSun Dec 09, 2018 5:38 pm 
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jared_j wrote:
The big hassle for me is difficulty securing the helmet so that it doesn’t sway as I stride, as it annoys the crap out of me.

There are many ski/mountaineering helmets that weight under 400 grams, some a scant 260.  A helmet that weight clipped onto the haul strap of the pack shouldn't knock you off your stride.  A Voile strap between the ice axe loop at the bottom of the pack and the helmet strap seems like a simple way to minimize swaying.

I also have a full face helmet that would be a pain to carry @ 1250 grams -- but I only use that when I'm doing stupid sh## in range of the ski patrol.
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DIYSteve
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PostSun Dec 09, 2018 7:42 pm 
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RandyHiker wrote:
Do you make the same complaint about your bike helmet?

No. My bike helmet is very well ventilated and my average average speed is >14mph, thus plenty of cooling wind flow. Contrast skinning: less ventilated helmet, 2-3mph average speed.

+1 to what joker said.

And back when I bicycled 10,000 miles a year, I often removed my helmet when ascending mountain passes. I'll likely do that again if and when I get back into long distance touring.

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RandyHiker
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 1:00 am 
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DIYSteve wrote:
RandyHiker wrote:
Do you make the same complaint about your bike helmet?

No. My bike helmet is very well ventilated and my average average speed is >14mph, thus plenty of cooling wind flow. Contrast skinning: less ventilated helmet, 2-3mph average speed.

So why does your ski helmet lack ventilation?

Most "ski" helmets are designed for lift skiing , where warmth is big consideration and weight isn't.

Most people use touring specific skis and boots for touring which are lighter than lift oriented gear, why not helmets as well?

Also different from cycling is the temperature when skinning  around freezing for skinning vs 70-80 F for summer cycling, that has a big effect on cooling available to the ski tourer.

I was taught to avoid sweating during winter travel -- shedding layers and adjusting pace to avoid  dampening insulating layers.  I'll strip down to bare skin on my upper body and adjust pace if needed.   This may seem superfluous on day trips, but damp under layers are bad news when a day trip becomes an unplanned overnighter.

To the OP, Whether you wear a helmet on your head or carry it on your pack consider getting a light (sub 1 lb) touring specific helmet.  They vent better and have less weight to flop around when carried. 

A heavy helmet that you are tempted to leave behind is poor protection.

I think about Don Hanson, the prior owner of Scottish Lakes, who was killed by a big block of snow falling off of a tree and consider the potential value of a helmet that is light enough and well ventilated enough to wear at all times.  Like any of these: https://skimo.co/helmets
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DIYSteve
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 7:00 am 
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RandyHiker wrote:
So why does your ski helmet lack ventilation?

It has ample ventilation while I'm skiing downhill. But it provides no meaningful ventilation when skinning uphill at 2-3 mph.

That is compounded by the fact that skinning uphill creates much more body heat than skiing downhill.

This is not difficult physics and physiology.

If you really want to avoid getting hit on the head while ski touring, consider staying home, sitting on the couch and watching TV.
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RandyHiker
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 7:50 am 
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DIYSteve wrote:
If you really want to avoid getting hit on the head while ski touring, consider staying home, sitting on the couch and watching TV.

DIYSteve dropping into quasi personal attacks after just two rounds, WTF?
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thunderhead
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 8:01 am 
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Ya, ski helmets and goggles are definetly too warm to be on for most climbs.  I just strap mine to any of the loops on the back of my pack with its chinstrap.  It hangs bottom up so it collects precip.  Not a problem with dry snow but if its raining it would get wet.  I bring a bigger pack and stash it inside on wet days.
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DIYSteve
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 8:17 am 
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RandyHiker wrote:
DIYSteve dropping into quasi personal attacks after just two rounds, WTF?

touchy touchy for a guy getting all aggro re why we should do it your way or risk certain death. Read you posts, Randy, and you'll see who decided to pick a fight.

RandyHiker wrote:
I'll strip down to bare skin on my upper body and adjust pace if needed.

Except, in your case, your head, which is part of upper body. Ventilating head is key to keeping the body cool.
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treeswarper
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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 8:49 am 
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How can a helmet help when a "large block of snow" falling from a tree smashes into you?  Some of those Whomps of Snow come down hard enough that neck damage would be the problem. 

It's kind of like expecting a hard hat to protect you when a large tree hits you dead on.  It's over, hat on or off.

I have packed my hard hat with a strap from my pack threaded through the back part of the suspension.  That was when walking on roads or trails where it was unlikely that anything other than a meteor was going to smash into my head.

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PostMon Dec 10, 2018 8:51 am 
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DIYSteve wrote:
RandyHiker wrote:
DIYSteve dropping into quasi personal attacks after just two rounds, WTF?

touchy touchy for a guy getting all aggro re why we should do it your way or risk certain death. Read you posts, Randy, and you'll see who decided to pick a fight.

👍Pretty sure it was four rounds in, anyway.

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